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Bill Chambers
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Please note that all framegrabs are from the 1080p version ***½/**** Image A Sound A- Extras B+ starring Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner, Anne Baxter, Edward G Robinson screenplay by Æneas MacKenzie, Jesse L. Lasky, Jr., Jack Gariss, Fredric M. Frank, in accordance with the ancient texts of Philo, Josephus, Eusebius, the Midrash, and the Holy Scriptures directed by Cecil B. De Mille by Bill Chambers A harbinger of the pageantry to come, Cecil B. De Mille's 1956 The Ten Commandments begins with a pair of ornate drapes. De Mille himself emerges from behind them and steps up to a microphone. Back then, this would've had an uncanny effect on filmgoers, who were used to seeing curtains shield the silver screen from view until the lights went down. (To my recollection, curtains went the way of the dodo in the late-'80s, when they were deemed impractical by the new cookie-cutter multiplexes that would drive the traditional movie palace to extinction.) De Mille, then a name synonymous with "director" to the American public, proceeds to all but invent William Castle as he introduces The Gimmick: What you are about to see will fill in all the gaps in the biblical account of... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Film Freak Central
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Tom Clancy's Without Remorse ***/**** starring Michael B. Jordan, Jodie Turner-Smith, Jamie Bell, Guy Pearce screenplay by Taylor Sheridan and Will Staples, based on the novel by Tom Clancy directed by Stefano Sollima by Walter Chaw A little less than halfway through Stefano Sollima's Without Remorse, ex-Navy SEAL hotshot John Kelly (Michael B. Jordan), decked out in an orange prison jumpsuit, tells his former commanding officer, Lt. Greer (Jodie Turner-Smith), that they fought for a country that didn't love them for the promise the United States represented--and that, somewhere along the way, a contract was broken. Kelly is the blunt object the Daniel Craig Bond cycle identified Her Majesty's finest as: the spiked ball at the end of a medieval pike, all dressed up in fancy gadgets and ritualized dogma, amounting at the end to savagery in patriotic drag. He's not Odysseus in this construct, he's Achilles; his only weakness is that he believed there was ever a contract in the first place. The message is clear in this re-imagining of one of Tom Clancy's lesser-known bits of military/industrial agitprop that should this become a franchise, the thrust of it will be that its rage is righteous...and righteously Black. Simply... Continue reading
Posted Apr 30, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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*/**** starring Anson Mount, Abbie Cornish, Eddie Marsan, Anthony Hopkins screenplay by James C. Wolf directed by Nick Stagliano by Walter Chaw 25 minutes into Nick Stagliano's very serious The Virtuoso, our erstwhile The American assassin, the unnamed virtuoso in question (Anson Mount), receives a note inscribed with what appears to be a child's handwriting (it isn't, which is only one reason why it's funny) telling him who his next target will be. As the Virtuoso, in his own second-person narration, lays out some ground rules in a world-weary, Fight Club-aspiring way, we see him burning what is obviously a different piece of paper in the fireplace. One might wonder about the sleight-of-hand happening here: Is Virtuoso, recently traumatized by a job gone tragically (and hilariously) wrong, looking to screw his mentor The Mentor (Anthony Hopkins) by holding on to the Mission: Impossible message intended for self-destruction? Will this slip of incriminating paper be the "check and mate" of a twisty noir's mind-bending puzzle-box? Or is it a simple continuity error they either didn't notice or figured didn't really matter because the audience will be too dazzled by the clockwork precision of the compulsive, extravagant-to-the-point-of-self-satire script? You're smart. When we're... Continue reading
Posted Apr 28, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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***/**** starring Bob Odenkirk, Aleksey Serebryakov, Connie Nielsen, Christopher Lloyd written by Derek Kolstad directed by Ilya Naishuller by Walter Chaw I spent a lot of my freshman year in college in the shadow of post-trauma from a failed suicide attempt, untreated depression, and what felt like hardwired self-loathing. I looked for fights then and found them sometimes. I am so full of rage and frustration. I am beset by violent fantasies. When I watch videos of people turning the tables on attackers or racists, I wonder if, in the same situation, with the same upper hand, I would be able to stop hitting once I started. Age has mellowed me; my wife and my family have civilized me to some extent, and I don't punch walls anymore, you know? It's just sadness and self-loathing left in the debris, should anyone think to sift through it. I don't think I'm unusual. I think men aren't given the mechanism to express their despair in any way other than through violence and rage, and therein lies the reason everything is broken now and why we're largely beyond repair. We are the pure residue of a vile evolutionary animal. Everything that doesn't make... Continue reading
Posted Apr 24, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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**½/**** starring Lewis Tan, Jessica McNamee, Tadanobu Asano, Hiroyuki Sanada screenplay by Greg Russo and Dave Callaham directed by Simon McQuoid by Walter Chaw I saw Paul W.S. Anderson's 1995 Mortal Kombat movie on opening night at a two-screen strip-mall theatre in Seattle with my friends Keith, Sam, and Dan. We knew the catchphrases from endless nights playing the game on a Sega Genesis, and we shouted them in jubilant concert like a Catholic callout and response. Since we were also fans of Highlander, the casting of Christopher Lambert as another ageless super-being felt exactly right. We were assholes. It was the best time of our lives. They were my groomsmen when I got married a few years later. Time has scattered us; Sam killed himself a couple of years ago. It all starts feeling like the framing story for Stand by Me. What's left are memories like this, which seem the easiest way now to get a movie project off the ground--a strip-mining of nostalgia that speaks more to a generational experience of loss than to a real paucity of imagination. If it didn't work, it wouldn't keep happening, and our deathless hunger for polyglot mosaics in pursuit of... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2021 at Film Freak Central
**½/**** Image A- Sound A- Extras B+ starring Jennifer Westfeldt, Heather Juergensen, Tovah Feldshuh, Esther Wurmfeld screenplay by Jennifer Westfeldt & Heather Juergensen directed by Charles Herman-Wurmfeld by Walter Chaw New Yorker Jessica Stein, referred to at one point in Kissing Jessica Stein as the Jewish Sandra Dee, is looking for love in the brack of the late-twentysomething dating pool. This means that we'll get a dating montage during which we sample the poor object choices available to the intrepid, sensitive, modern urban woman about town. A devout reader of Rilke (pegging her as both dreamy and pretentious, which also describes the film at hand), Jessica perks up when she hears a favourite passage quoted in a singles ad--only slightly tortured by the fact that the ad has been placed by another woman, Helen (Heather Juergensen). Helen runs a small art gallery, Jessica is an artist; Helen knows Rilke, Jennifer knows Rilke; and though Jennifer is almost pathologically incapable of falling headlong into lesbian sexuality, through the tender, Color Purple ministrations of Helen, she does come around in time. Kissing Jessica Stein (adapted from the stage play "Lipstick" by the two stars and authors of the piece (Westfeldt and Juergensen))... Continue reading
Posted Apr 21, 2021 at Film Freak Central
*½/**** Image B+ Sound C+ Extras B- starring LL Cool J, Jada Pinkett Smith, Vivica A. Fox, Loretta Devine screenplay by David Dean Bottrell & Jessie Jones, based on the play "Dearly Departed" by David Dean Bottrell directed by Doug McHenry by Walter Chaw A second-helping of Soul Food but seasoned this time around with a preponderance of syrupy good intentions and a hulking mess of stock burlesque caricatures, Kingdom Come vacillates between ridiculous and irritating: a far cry from the intended "heartwarming" and "funny." Though it's always nice to see a film with an all-African-American cast that doesn't rely on gangsters and gunplay (ignoring a gun that is drawn and forgotten early on), I'm not certain that the opposite of that genre is necessarily forced dramedy camaraderie, complete with a sitcom narrative's rise and fall, made popular by Waiting to Exhale. Still, for as simple-minded and shamelessly overacted as it is, the film is somewhat redeemed by an overall genial goodwill. Based on a play called "Dearly Departed" by David Dean Bottrell (adapted for the screen by Bottrell and Jessie Jones) and never escaping the broadness of those theatrical roots (Jada Pinkett Smith is especially bizarre and insufferable in... Continue reading
Posted Apr 21, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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I don't know what I was expecting from Travis Stevens's Jakob's Wife, but it wasn't an at-times-heartbreaking study of a woman in late-middle-age, coming to terms with her mortality and given a second chance at the rest of her life in the unlikeliest of places. I like everyone involved with this project, and there's no question that knowing Barbara Crampton (who plays the eponymous preacher's wife, Ann) and her co-star Larry Fessenden (Jakob) personally has flavoured how I see this film. Sufficed to say that Jakob's Wife is clearly an emotional autobiography for Crampton--an intensely personal picture that's not coincidentally home to her best performance. She kills me in this. I don't know if she knows how good she is; I don't know that she'd ever really been given a chance to show it before this. Though most of the reaction to the film after its premiere at this year's SXSW was positive, few of the early returns did more than touch on how Jakob's Wife confronts the matter of growing old with someone and the work of love over the natural course of a lifetime. (Those anticipating another Re-Animator should expect something more along the lines of Only Lovers... Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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***½/**** Image A- Sound B+ Extras A- starring Eric Stoltz, Mary Stuart Masterson, Craig Sheffer, Lea Thompson written by John Hughes directed by Howard Deutch by Bill Chambers "Cinema is the most beautiful fraud in the world. In order to criticize a movie, you have to make another movie." John Hughes may have had this famous Jean-Luc Godard quote in mind when he embarked on the screenplay for Some Kind of Wonderful, a gender-swapped version of his heavily-compromised Pretty in Pink that came out less than a year later. But Some Kind of Wonderful did not start out like it ended up: The script that director Howard Deutch originally signed on to direct was about a citywide first date between a social pariah and the prettiest girl in school that notoriously called for the Blue Angels flight demonstration squadron to put on a private show for the couple. A broad comedy, it opened with its hero masturbating into a pillow. If you've seen Some Kind of Wonderful, this will all sound pretty incongruous. Deutch had planned on reusing Pretty in Pink's Jon Cryeri, but the remaining roles proved difficult to cast. There are differing accounts as to what happened next.... Continue reading
Posted Apr 14, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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Please note that all framegrabs are from the 1080p version WW84 ½*/**** Image A Sound A Extras B starring Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Kristen Wiig, Pedro Pascal screenplay by Patty Jenkins & Geoff Johns & Dave Callaham directed by Patty Jenkins by Walter Chaw At some point, someone in some boardroom should have pushed away from the table and asked whether it was a good idea to have a subplot in their new Wonder Woman movie about a person in the Middle East wishing that colonizers would be expelled from occupied territories. (The granting of said wish subsequently leading somehow to nuclear holocaust.) I mean, with or without an Israeli actress in the lead role. Not to say it's not geometrically worse with an Israeli actress in the lead role, because it is. Look, the real wonder of WW84 is that this maybe isn't the worst thing about it. Neither is how flat it looks, or how it starts with 45 minutes of poorly-timed slapstick before shifting into absolutely deadening action sequences, a weird body-possession intrigue, and a horrifying message about how you should never wish for things because everything has consequences attached to it. With so much riding on... Continue reading
Posted Apr 9, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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Shudder's Host, directed and co-written by Rob Savage, is this peculiar moment's The Blair Witch Project, a landmark film that provides insight into not just these dark times via the technologies that have evolved from our collective woe, but also how we ourselves have evolved, changed in unexpected ways by the products of our hands. Never so much as to lose touch with what scares us, though. Even the genesis of the project--Host was born of a prank a bored Savage devised to scare his friends on a Zoom chat one evening (a prank posted later on social media, where it gained another half-life)--has its roots in how things that are old-hat (the noise in the attic, the jump scare, the Rear Window effect of being a voyeur to the love and death of loved ones without the power to affect them) don't go away as the tools of our existence change. They adapt. What we've always feared, we fear still. And here we are now with this stuff we've Frankensteined into existence (social media, virtual hosting, Bluetooth, the cloud) without a complete understanding of the doors it'll unlock in our relationship with the universe. We're playing with fire, and... Continue reading
Posted Apr 4, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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**½/**** starring Ed Westwick, Louise Linton written and directed by Louise Linton by Walter Chaw Louise Linton's Me You Madness is a particularly fraught and grim fandango seeking to walk the line between self-parody and self-aggrandizement. It dances along the edge of a blade, this one, with the kind of extraordinary privilege afforded the fabulously wealthy, powerful, and beautiful. On the one hand, you're making fun of your ridiculous luck; on the other hand, or maybe the same hand, you're rubbing everyone's face in it. False modesty is dangerous--and unsuccessful self-satire is the most deluded manifestation of it. Shit, successful self-satire isn't that great, either, because it suggests that one's station is so elevated it can be a target of satire. So is Me You Madness terrible? It's fabulously terrible, calamitously terrible. It's also genuinely fascinating as both symptom and diagnosis of exactly what's wrong with the particular strain of capitalistic excess embodied by Linton and her vile husband, Steve Mnuchin. These are the architects of the end of the world, and this is evidence that they're aware of it but don't quite know what it is that they know. What we know is that Linton has written, produced, directed,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 31, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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½*/**** starring Godzilla, King Kong, Alexander Skarsgård, Demián Bichir screenplay by Eric Pearson and Max Borenstein directed by Adam Wingard by Walter Chaw Godzilla is a reaction to America's attack on two civilian targets with nuclear weapons in the same way the current American superhero cycle is a reaction to 9/11. King Kong is an offshoot of Edgar Wallace's sledgehammer racist "Sanders of the River" tales, which he parlayed into early drafts of the screenplay that eventually became 1933's King Kong. Though it's possible to make a Godzilla or a King Kong movie without these ghosts of American war crimes, colonialism, and racism haunting it, Adam Wingard's Godzilla vs. Kong (hereafter GvK) ain't it. Not when these two giant metaphors for the poison of American exceptionalism destroy Hong Kong, a Chinese city the British only recently returned to the Chinese, before banding together to fight a Mexican-American's Japanese-piloted robot dinosaur. The film is a mess, an ideological jumble and a disaster of narrative that reduces its able cast to half exposition dump, half glazed reaction shots. It doesn't have anything to say and even in the worst of its predecessors, this was never the case. GvK isn't interested in ecology,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 29, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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*½/**** Image C Sound A Extras B- starring Kevin Bacon, Elizabeth McGovern, Alec Baldwin, James Ray written and directed by John Hughes by Bill Chambers I rented She's Having a Baby the moment it hit video out of brand loyalty to John Hughes, whose teen movies had had an epic and indoctrinating influence on my peers and me. And I was largely indifferent to it up until the closing-credits montage of celebrities tossing out names for the titular baby, at which point my lack of enthusiasm gave way to dismay.* At the time, I assumed the film's subject matter was too adult for 13-year-old me (and it was), but 18 years later I didn't like it any better, and after revisiting it with another 15 years' distance--which brings us to 2021--I've decided that when it comes to She's Having a Baby, "it's not me, it's you" suffices. Even though the travails of one Jefferson "Jake" Briggs remain as hypothetical to me as they were when I was a kid, movies, as Roger Ebert was fond of saying, are empathy machines; the cinema would never have flourished if films demanded a 1:1 relationship with the viewer's experiences. (Granted, this is also... Continue reading
Posted Mar 28, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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Even among the generally positive responses to Madeleine Sims-Fewer and Dusty Mancinelli's superlative Violation, one finds evidence of the predictable fallout that occurs whenever a woman in horror, particularly in the rape-revenge category of horror, fails to adhere to expectations of victimhood. Surely a woman who reacts to rape with violence is psycho, yes? Violation has as its closest analogues the Greek tragedies involving a woman cruelly wronged who righteously wrongs in return; the final image of the film is as clear a metaphor as I can imagine for how we all, men and women alike, take on the sins of the father in our various acts of consumption, both gustatorial and sexual. I was excited to speak with co-writers/co-directors Ms. Sims-Fewer (who also stars) and Mr. Mancinelli about their film and its positive--if sometimes confused--reception. So often, exhaustingly often, when one seeks to change perception, one instead manages to reveal how unchangeable perceptions can be. We should be beyond this conversation in 2021. In a lot of ways, Violation reveals that we've yet to properly broach the topic. The pair, sitting on a pale blue couch with a Frida Kahlo throw pillow between them--an appropriate totem of gender ambiguity... Continue reading
Posted Mar 24, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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****/**** starring Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Gal Gadot, Amy Adams screenplay by Chris Terrio directed by Zack Snyder by Walter Chaw It opens with soundwaves visualized as ripples in the air--Superman's (Henry Cavill) death cry touching every part of a blasted world as the protection and decency he represents is murdered. I have historically hated Zack Snyder's vision of this universe because it felt grimdark in a weightless way, the posturing of an emo teenager who hasn't earned his weariness and cynicism. It felt like a put-on. Immature. When the worst parts of comic fandom coalesced to demand a director's cut of a genuinely abominable film, Justice League, I, partly out of self-protection from a hateful horde and partly out of a sense of moral superiority, looked upon the project as first impossible, then misguided. I thought myself better than all this, which is unforgivable. I guess I wanted to believe that in a world in which I have figured nothing out, I had at least figured out that anything championed by trolls and incels could have no possible value to someone like me--who, of course, has nothing in common with these troglodytes except, you know, for the loneliness and... Continue reading
Posted Mar 19, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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***/**** starring Tom Holland, Ciara Bravo, Jack Reynor, Michael Rispoli screenplay by Angela Russo-Otstot and Jessica Goldberg, based on the novel by Nico Walker directed by Anthony Russo & Joe Russo by Walter Chaw When you hit someone coming and going, I think that either it's personal or you don't know what you want. For me, when MCU wunderkinds the Russo Brothers decide to make a big-budget, S.E. Hinton meets John Irving via T.S. Garp version of Rush, shit, I'm into it. One can either complain that everything coming out is the product of an algorithm or endeavour to notice when, for good or for ill, one gets exactly the kind of auteurist dream project in all the show-offy, chaotic glory one's been pining for in endless, exhausting thinkpieces. Criticism that the Russos are trying too hard with Cherry sounds to me suspiciously like the sort of unimaginative personal-grievance pieces cropping up around about the time Scorsese was making stuff like New York, New York, or when The Matrix sequels failed entirely to behave, or when Zack Snyder delivers a four-hour Greek God cut of a superhero movie that is distinctly the product of a single voice. I mean, hate... Continue reading
Posted Mar 17, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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*/**** starring Gary Oldman, Armie Hammer, Evangeline Lilly, Greg Kinnear written and directed by Nicholas Jarecki by Walter Chaw Nicholas Jarecki's Crisis is a Stanley Kramer piece, a "means well," ripped-from-the-headlines message flick that hews closer to 3 Needles than to Traffic in terms of effectiveness and humility. In place of dialogue, there is exposition; and in place of performances, there are swollen forehead veins and trembling lower lips, aghast at the injustices of a cold universe. Crisis sheds "importance" from itself like dander from a stressed but beloved pet, and it's unseemly to come down too hard on it when its greatest crimes are that it is middlebrow in its politeness and really doesn't have much to say beyond what's already inherently obvious. It's possible to do stuff like this and make something like The Insider--that is, something powerful, artful, and transformative. More commonly, it turns out like Crisis has turned out: instantly forgettable and mildly embarrassing in the way of your hip dad trying to jam with you about the evils of the sticky icky. Oh, and use a condom, son. The three storylines here blow the lid off the opioid crisis. The first is the deep-cover agent... Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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½*/**** starring Chloë Grace Moretz, Michael Peña, Colin Jost, Ken Jeong written by Kevin Costello directed by Tim Story by Walter Chaw I want to say right off the bat that Hanna-Barbera's "Tom & Jerry" cartoons were in constant syndication when I was a kid. I watched them every day after school, like all my friends did, and we agreed that we liked it best when Tom and Jerry were friends. We weren't peaceniks; honestly, I think all the unleavened brutality of the cartoons got tedious after a short while and we were starved for something that suggested creativity beyond how best to murder a cat. Thinking back, I wonder if these cartoons had anything to do with how cat abuse is still played for comedy in movies--I mean, you can't hurt them, right? The thing that's tempting about reviewing the new Tom and Jerry is to not take it very seriously. There's enough to skewer, after all, without bothering to engage it. Yet real people worked on this, an entire animation company's creative capital was spent on doing everything they could to honour the questionable source material (and they do a really good job), and now here it is,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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****/**** screenplay by Qui Nguyen & Adele Lim directed by Don Hall and Carlos López Estrada by Walter Chaw I've thought a lot lately about quitting, and seriously, this thing I've done over the last twenty-some years--this thing that started, ultimately, because I was a kid who couldn't speak the language and wanted desperately to belong to something that would never have me on my terms. I've thought about quitting, and it's a dangerous thing for someone like me to think that way. Movies were a thing I loved that never betrayed me, never abandoned me, whenever there was pain or confusion, or something I needed to work through; this was the art form that was primary for me as a catalyst for introspection. There's literature and music and poetry, of course, yet film could encompass all of those things. It's saved my life a time or two. I thought I had a place among others who loved it like me, but no one loves it like me--people love it like they love it. Or they just use it because they've failed at everything else and don't have the introspection to feel despair. When you give yourself over to an... Continue reading
Posted Mar 4, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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*/**** starring Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, Jermaine Fowler, Wesley Snipes screenplay by Kenya Barris and Barry W. Blaustein & David Sheffield directed by Craig Brewer by Walter Chaw I don't understand Craig Brewer's Coming 2 America, probably because I don't understand John Landis's Coming to America, either. For me, they are both artifacts of an alien culture where the references are obscure and the humour is arcane. I spent most of my life thinking the first film was making fun of Africans, only to learn that for a generation of Black creatives, the film was a rare example of positive, even admiring, representation of Africans in the American popular culture. I think that's true; I also know the fish-out-of-water machinations of Coming to America's plot--the cheap sex jokes, the gay terror, the burlesque of it--rubbed me the wrong way then and still do. But there's a sweetness to Akeem (Eddie Murphy), isn't there? These films are decidedly not for me. I do trust people with vital voices like Ryan Coogler, who apparently loved the first film and had his own ideas about a sequel--and I would say the analogue I can find while I'm grasping for one is the reception... Continue reading
Posted Mar 3, 2021 at Film Freak Central
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****/**** starring Colin Firth, Stanley Tucci written and directed by Harry Macqueen by Walter Chaw Tusker (Stanley Tucci) is an author of some minor renown who has a way with a toast and a loving, if sometimes crabby, relationship with his husband, Sam (Colin Firth). Sam is a concert pianist of even more minor renown whom Tusker teases at a diner along the route of a holiday they're taking in the English countryside by telling a waitress that Sam will be glad to sign an autograph for her if she likes. It's clear the poor woman doesn't have the first idea who Sam is, but she's very polite about it. Sam asks why Tusker does things like this when Tusker admits that half the time he doesn't get any joy out of it. Tusker says, "For the other half of the time." In his film Supernova, writer-director Harry Macqueen's script is consistently like this: understated, beautifully observed, intensely human. It's a two-hander with two of the absolute best actors on the planet, so how much script and direction do they need? However much it is, Macqueen gives them just enough. I love the way Sam says "Tusker" like "Tosca," the... Continue reading
Posted Feb 22, 2021 at Film Freak Central
Intro - https://www.patreon.com/posts/35450667 Proposed Syllabus - https://www.patreon.com/posts/35580696 1 - THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION https://www.patreon.com/posts/35478566 2 - THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER https://www.patreon.com/posts/35529002 3 - OUT OF THE PAST https://www.patreon.com/posts/35620139 4 - CONSTANTINE https://www.patreon.com/posts/35687139 5 - JOE VERSUS THE VOLCANO https://www.patreon.com/posts/35763094 6 - THE 39 STEPS https://www.patreon.com/posts/35855106 7 - SHERLOCK JR. https://www.patreon.com/posts/35974918... Continue reading
Posted Feb 21, 2021 at PATREON BACKUP
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Life During Wartime #23: THE MUPPET MOVIE (Patreon exclusive) by Walter Chaw The Muppet Movie (1979) U.S./Canada: Disney+ We started quarantine with the best-laid plans and nine months later--the duration of human gestation--find ourselves not somewhere we intended or could have predicted. We had a regular game night, but adding... Continue reading
Posted Feb 21, 2021 at PATREON BACKUP
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Life During Wartime #22: THE THING (Patreon exclusive) by Walter Chaw The Thing (1982) U.S.: Starz, DirecTV Canada: Crave Starz The rule my wife and I have for our kids about what they can watch is that there are really no restrictions, but the price is they need to have... Continue reading
Posted Feb 21, 2021 at PATREON BACKUP