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Jude McBain
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Oh I am so thrilled that you have loved reading the Odyssey. The Wilson translation is really wonderful and I too have been enjoying reading it over the last month or two. The Iliad is more difficult to read because the subject is so brutal but I hope you get there with it too. Reading the Nicholson alongside will be useful I feel as he explains the very archaic bits in it very well. And since reading and seeing a dramatic version of Alice Oswald's Memorial poems where she picks out the back stories of protagonists, I have felt an even greater affinity to this monumental work. "War and the pity of war " - I don't know why we forget so easily.
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Wish I could come! Have a lovely time x
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Congratulations on all your awards! Richly deserved - love those dahlias!! I've just received my tubers in the post ready to plant out in our new little garden at the rear of our house. I bought a mixed lot called "Classics" so we'll see what ensues!! Spring is here!! Love those local shows so much. Here in Adelaide we've just had our big Royal Adelaide Show which despite being a huge 9 day affair, still retains all its connections to our rural communities. The craft and cooking competitions are wonderful and hotly contested. There are wood chopping competitions, pig racing, sheep shearing, you name it. The highlight for us this year was watching the state champion sheep trial border collies fail miserably to round up the very fat very frisky sheep who'd been living the good life in show pens for a week and literally bolted when let out of their pen. Funniest thing I've seen in ages.
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2018 on The Village Show.. at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Thank you that's very kind but of course I have already ordered a copy from a local distributor here. As Barbara below says "Disability" is the category to which any of us could join at any moment as Kate Davies found - so it makes you look at your own lucky state in a different way. "Ability" is to be cherished in whatever manifestation.
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My brother-in-law suffered an episode of Bell's Palsy earlier this year. Completely out of the blue and while he was away from his home town too. It completely threw his idea of himself as a fit, very active, healthy person out the window and he found it very difficult to come to terms with what had happened for quite some time. He has now recovered thankfully and resumed all his usual activities but to say he was shaken to the core would not be an understatement. This is a very apposite post too because I have just finished reading Kate Davies'(of Kate Davies Designs and knitting fame) book Handywoman and cannot recommend it highly enough. You would absolutely love it combining as it does her journey after a sudden very debilitating stroke, the power of making and doing, Shetland, wool, knitting, walking, disability and all its attendant politics, and also of love and sheer determination. It is really inspiring and so well written.
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Dysons have penetrated to the Antipodes where I have had one for several years after a Certain Person decided to use our old workhorse one to vacuum up wood shavings in the shed. Needless to say it wasn't very well after that! My Dyson is a pull along traditional type of vacuum but I am seriously putting in a request for one like yours. I'm over extension cords and the like and we only have rugs not fitted carpets to do so don't need anything too big. Do they come in blue?? That would be the clincher for me!
Toggle Commented Aug 28, 2018 on We need to talk about... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Very belated and after the event good wishes to you all esp the Gamekeeper re the broken leg!!!! Just caught up with this news in your world as we've been sans internet for a few days. Crikey! What a thing to happen and thank goodness for mobile phones! Love the fussy cutting - and total lack of willpower re the Millefiori quilts haha!! You'll get there! I read up about the 1718 quilt in an insert in a British quilting magazine I subscribe to. Very fascinating esp about some of the papers behind the patches. I am currently learning how to make applique flowers using the fusible backing paper and glue method. So far, the glue is winning.... All the best for recovery and rehab to the Gamekeeper and your nerves. Enjoy the walking and quilting!
Toggle Commented Aug 21, 2018 on That and this... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Wow just Wow!! Those quilts are wonderful and very inspiring. I am also very encouraged by the fact that Mary Brown was 75 when she made her beautiful Brown/Reynolds quilt! Plenty of time then.....! One of the members of my quilting group has the Millefiori book - I've declined to borrow it for the time being because I know what will happen! I'm going to a needleturn applique class next month though.
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Catching up a few days late here as we now have the internet on in our new home! Hooray! Love that postcard and Liberty tana lawn - its just so beautiful. Have to relate this story: I was in Liberty's shop in London in January and began a lovely chat with a woman as we were rummaging through all the little packs of small offcuts on the fourth floor. She was looking for a particular pattern so I started helping her. Turned out she was on her way home to Lancashire from Australia - says she : "you probably won't know where?" "Try me" I says and of course it was where we have just moved to and we even knew people in common!! The world is getting smaller!
Toggle Commented Jul 24, 2018 on A Postcard to Myself... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Yes of course to stationery although I am a random purchaser of notebooks - often acquiring one from somewhere I've been recently as a memento. Also like Cath above I'm still ploughing through the unused school notebooks left behind by our children mostly used for Things to Do lists etc. I'm deep into the Odyssey again having got hold of the Emily Wilson new translation on a recent trip to Sydney with a compulsory stop at Abbey's bookshop there. Knew they'd have it! It's wonderful!
Toggle Commented Jul 17, 2018 on We Need to Talk About... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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This is a very timely post - my oldest school friend is coming to visit next month and her son and DIL have very sadly had two such still births in the last three years. It's a very tragic situation and often one very hard to talk about. My friend and I have shared books, life etc for the best part of fifty years and I think she'll get a lot out of this.
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What an amazing story - amongst all the rest of the stories around the Romanovs! We were lucky enough to spend a day 4 years ago with a wonderful guide from the Ekaterinberg Guide Centre visiting all the Romanov sites in and around Ekaterinberg. I found the pilgrimage churches and centre at Ganina Yama quite over the top especially in regard to the beatification of the Romanovs and I found it hard to relate to the place at all except as a cynical source of revenue raising by the Orthodox church. I much preferred visiting the eerie very sobering simple sites in the forest where the family's remains were interred by the Bolsheviks. What a long lonely horrific way from the Winter Palace.
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That is indeed exquisite craftsmanship. Thanks too for sharing this.
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Swimming with Seals is on the list! And I have a print of that beautiful tapestry from the Hoxa gallery which I just love. The whole "wild swimming" thing is a bit amusing to this antipodean. We have always just gone to the beach/river/lake and hopped in! Never thought about it. My mother used to send my siblings and I off on a summer's day to walk the two miles to the beach and we came home at dark. Unsupervised and jumping off cliffs, jetties, getting into rips and swimming out of them. A different world and time. Now I live 200 metres from the beach and still swim a lot - there are dolphins by the reef and sometimes seals out by the fishing boats. I love it.
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2018 on Pendings... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Steph I can't believe the coincidence of you mentioning this book by Graham. I have just finally tracked down a copy to replace a much loved and sadly lost one. It is the most wonderful book.
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2018 on Ithaka ~ C.P.Cavafy at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Thanks so much for this DGR! Years since I read it first and it hasn't lost any power or beauty over the years. I'm afraid my Greek is as rusty as the colour on that beautiful vase so was thankful for the translation too. I always loved Tennyson's poem about Ulysses too.
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2018 on Ithaka ~ C.P.Cavafy at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Very big fan of Jonathon Raban. I loved Old Glory and Bad Land was fantastic as well. The story of those settlements in Montana in the early 20thC was so very like many of the soldier settlement disasters here in Australia after WW1 it was eerie. I must read Coasting. We were quite frankly appalled at the Falklands War. His views seem very refreshing.
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2018 on Jonathan Raban at dovegreyreader scribbles
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My pleasings are that we got the keys for our lovely new home on Friday and the first thing I did was take a geranium around to put on the window sill. We will move there in about 5 weeks when the floors are finished. Hooray!! And I bought myself a navy blue leather bag while in London last winter. Not too big and no bling. Perfect!
Toggle Commented Jun 10, 2018 on Pleasings... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I too have ordered the Women's Work book - sounds really terrific. I also commend the Penelopiad very highly and also agree with Mia about the 5thC tragedies. Antigone etc. Just as relevant today as when they were written. Enjoy your Homer summer - we are moving to our new home in the next few weeks so when I unpack I'll be joining in. PS: We called our little caravan Penelope because I thought it was time she got to have some adventures.
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2018 on Journeying... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I love daisies too and yours really are beautiful. And so is that photo of your Dad! Love the poem too - all stargazer lovers should come downunder sometime. You don't have to go too far from a city here to see the Milky Way in all its glory - the Emu in the Sky according to our Aboriginal astronomers.
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As you know I am a longtime Homer fan having first read a version of the Iliad when I was around 14. Then studied him at university both the Iliad and Odyssey in Richmond Lattimore's translations which I love and also some of both in Attic Greek for my classics degree. I haven't read the new Emily Wilson translation yet but certainly will be. Adam Nicolson's book was absolutely wonderful and sent me once more back to my Homer editions. Also we had recently traversed Russia and seen the incredible Scythian treasures from the steppes in the Hermitage so his tying together recent scholarship re the horsemen from the steppes to the emergence of states such as Troy was so illuminating. Thanks to Readerlane for the recommend of the book about Women's Work - sounds wonderful. Penelope in the Odyssey is my top Homeric hero and I love all the "women's work" things in the Odyssey. Nausicaa and her servants doing all the laundry etc. Finally - it's nearly the 100th year anniversary of Armistice day. Every time I think of Troy and the Dardanelles, I think of all the ANZAC boys from "the uttermost ends of the earth" as Kipling put it: Here's Homer: "and the watchfires blazed among them. Hundreds strong, as stars in the night sky glittering round the moon's brilliance blaze in all their glory when the air falls to a sudden, windless calm... all the lookout peaks stand out and the jutting cliffs and the steep ravines and down from the high heavens bursts the boundless bright air and all the stars shine clear and the shepherd's heart exults - so many fires burned between the ships and the Xanthus" whirling rapids set by the men of Troy, bright against their walls. A thousand fires were burning there on the plain and beside each fire sat fifty fighting men poised in the leaping blaze, and champing oats and glistening barley, stationed by their chariots, stallions waited for Dawn to mount her glowing throne.” Nearly three thousand years later has much changed??
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Currently reading two books whose theme of unseen forgotten female artists "where women live in the shadows of men but still find their own ways of creating" to quote the back cover of one. Think you would love them both DGR. The first "The Birdman's Wife" by Melissa Ashley is about Elizabeth Gould, wife of the famous 19thC ornithologist John Gould. She was the person who actually did most of his most famous engravings - over 650 in all including Darwin's Galapagos finches. Fabulous book. Then Robyn Cadwalladder's "Book of Colours" about the creation of an illuminated prayer book in the 1300s in London. A very beautifully written book that creates a whole world that is all but gone except that the power of books to change lives hasn't. Speaking of that, I also saw the movie of "The Bookshop" last week. If you haven't seen that yet do go as it does a very good job of Fitzgerald's novella I think.
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The State Library in Melbourne is such a beautiful space Linda. Lucky you spending a childhood there!
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Congratulations on your literary efforts! What a champion of your love of reading your Dad was thank goodness and Miss Whatsit wasn't fit to be in charge of anyone's education with that attitude. Sadly only too prevalent in those times. I was very fortunate to have a wonderful public library at the end of our street near the shopping centre of our suburb. When I was 8 the librarian in charge overruled a bossy older one who had said I couldn't borrow a book about Africa as it was from the adult section. She made out an adult lending card for me on the spot bless her. I spent most afternoons after school there in heavenly far away peace until it closed at 5pm as I had 3 younger siblings at home. Worlds opened before my eyes and I came to realise I had options in the world far beyond where I grew up. The power of reading - and a good public library - cannot be under estimated.
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I'm also in the never miss an episode camp although I have to catch up often so haven't seen the end of the current series yet. I too think its a magnificent portrayal of the life of the midwives in the East End and the social, economic and political circumstances in which they were working at the time. The thalidomide episodes had me in buckets. My sister trained as a midwife at Manly hospital on the north shore of Sydney. She had a very hilarious experience that year as Manly were in the rugby league final and at 5.30pm after they had just won, the doors of the hospital kept opening to mothers who had been hanging on watching the game before they all turned up with babies presenting everywhere. She then went on to work for years in the Northern Territory in remote Aboriginal communities where conditions for mothers were third world. I so admire the work of midwives everywhere.
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