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mary e.
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I don't care if it's dinosaur slow, I'm a die hard, don't-miss-a-day-to-check-in, CZ follower! Breathe in Breathe out Breathe in Breathe out Sending you hugs and support, Cathy!
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SherriS, This is exactly how I feel... and with a son going off to college like Cathy, I regret I didn't do this.
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Such great recaps, Cathy! (Editorial note: your last layout has a typo - it says you through a joing party, but I'm fairly confident that's not a new type of party, and that you meant 'joint'?) Can't wait to see the website!
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This is exciting, Cathy! LOVE that you change things up -- makes you and your blog interesting and current! Will keep my fingers crossed that it goes smoothly. There'll be bumps along the way, but who cares? It'll give you even more to write about! Can't wait to see the new look!
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your posts give me courage, Cathy. your written reflections give me pause. your honesty is enviable. i mean that. your journey is mine, too.
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2014 on An apology seems in order at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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I love this idea - I've struggled over the past few years, because I feel like I've been so inconsistent with my photographing and journaling. I get the whole "I haven't been on track, so it's just not worth trying" mentality, and then I see hybrid pages, etc., and feel like a scrap loser. This, though, is simple, straightforward, and kinda like a photo diary love letter. I'm so all over this. Thanks, Cathy, for another amazing, simple idea. Remember what I've said about your IP? You're givin' it away! But I am SO GRATEFUL!! Mary
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It's cold and rainy here in Chicago, so this looks great on a day like today. Thanks for sharing Cathy!
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I only echo everyone else's thoughts. It's been nothing short of a privilege seeing your craft so eloquently and professionally and personally portrayed through Aidan, Cole, Dan and your extended family (and visiting furry friends!). I have always secretly been envious of your ability to capture moments through your lens, Cathy, and then to freeze them in time with your personal, candid, and so well written prose. As we send off our son this fall as well, one of my regrets was that I just didn't dive in and start capturing the thoughts with the photos as i went along. You and Dan hopefully feel the joy and satisfaction in knowing that you poured into Aidan (and Cole), and then you provided them with the wings to fly. I want to parent like you do, and often look to your open and accepting approach to your kids as a guide for when I'm trying to control my kids actions / outcomes too much. All the very, very best, Aidan, and the whole Zielske family. It's been a wonderful journey!
Toggle Commented Jun 6, 2014 on The day is here at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Brandie, This is exactly what happened to me. I suffered debilitating migraines - too many carbs and TOO.MUCH.SUGAR. Allergy testing showed candida OFF THE CHARTS. Doc put me on a complete elimination diet, and it's been nothing short of a miracle. I've left all sugar and all carbs (save for natural carbs from meats, veg, and very occasional fruit) and I've been pain free for over 52 days. Cutting sugar is the best thing you can do for yourself. I know I've said it before, and I know you feel like it's a Mount Everest, Cathy, but once you go to the top of that mountain, crest it, and go over the other side, just like Brandie said, ALL OF YOUR CRAVINGS literally go away. I'm not making it up - exagerrating - or being a drama queen. You know my story of anorexia, living on sugar, exercising hours a day -- the whole schpiel. The only thing I can say is that the cravings went away, my body came back to really good health, the pain vanished, and my energy is now, 6 weeks later starting to really soar. I still make desserts for my family, but they're made with non-glycemic ingredients and they're delicious! But, you know what? We don't have dessert very often anymore - and we're all fine!! One of the other best things about this whole change for me, is I have so much more TIME to think about other things. I do have to plan meals carefully, but now that I"m in the rhythm, it's easy! And I'm spending the wasted energy I used to use thinking (or beating myself up) about food, doing creative, active, engaging things! I'm never going back - it's like when you gave up smoking. You prob thought you'd never be able to do it, and then you finally just put your head down and said "enough is enough". Keep on keepin' on - you're moving in the perfect direction!! (And with your marriage, too - which studies show to have an enormous impact on how we feel physically as our emotional and mental health is a KEY factor in our overall health!
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Beth, It can feel overwhelming, but because I was forced to (via my medical results) and because I just felt crappy all the time, I just changed my mindset. I simply decided I was going to close the chapter on that part of my life. It was not that hard, truth be told, but it was the biggest paradigm shift in my thinking since I can remember. I read all labels, I eat foods that are recognizable, I read all labels, I do not eat anything that I suspect has sugar if I can't be sure, I read all labels, I make many of my own foods (WAY easier than you think but does mean you have to plan), I read all labels. See the pattern? Once you get the sugar out of your system, the cravings go away. Then you just have to work on your mindset. Honestly! Finding veggies, meats, fruits (for me, very sparingly), nuts, good fats, etc. is not hard, really. What is the biggest mind-shift is not focusing on food, not "treating" or punishing myself for things (SUCH a food-centric mindset which is not healthy), and making food a back seat to my life. I have discovered SO many foods and tastes I didn't know existed because I just knee-jerk went with the sugar train. I find myself wanting to try all kinds of new recipes, some of which that taste very similar to the "favorites" of the past, but that are actually great for my mind and body! One big caveat: in order for the body to feed the brain, which regulates everything (our mood, energy, focus, metabolism, etc), it's imperative that the right nutrient balance is maintained. I did not just cut sugar/grains/dairy and just eat veggies. I monitor (using MyFitnessPal but there are many others)my carbs, fats, proteins, sugars, and I exercise. Not running 4000 miles, and manic exercise, but I walk 2-3 miles a day, and am on my feet more than I sit. In order to make a lifestyle change, and in order for the body to burn fat instead of carbs, you need to cut out the sugar and add in healthy fats! It seems counter-intuitive, but it's been proven scientifically! The right balance of fat (and that means a significant amount of healthy fats!) brings about greater health, weight loss (I'm experiencing it!), and better heart health. I'm hijacking Cathy's site, which I don't want to do, but if you want to connect, let me know. YOU.CAN.DO.IT. I'm the past poster child for sugar, and I did it. Good luck!
Toggle Commented May 8, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Sherri - I posted earlier in these comments. I have a sugar allergy. It's real. And it wreaked havoc on my life for decades. I'm sugar free, grain free, dairy free.... and ALLERGY free.
Toggle Commented May 6, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Brilliant, brilliant post, Joan!!! And add the fanatacism of running and triathaloning and CrossFiting into this crazy mix, and it further fuels the "eat processed fake food, but exercise it off" mentality. SO many people are looking to processed foods as their core diet and then comforting themselves with a brief stint of extreme exercise to "balance the scales". Our bodies are not designed for that.... I couldn't agree more, Joan, with what you've said here. MODERATION is the key, but sadly, most of the Western world (namely the US), does not know that word.
Toggle Commented May 6, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Grains and dairy are a real Western world habit. I eat eggs, spinach, meats (Canadian bacon, real bacon (that is truly real and not pumped full of nitrates and ridiculous amounts of salt). Sometimes I have chicken and roasted vegetables, tuna with red peppers on the side... I mainly eat eggs, but you can eat any food at breakfast. Now that I'm making great tasting food, there's no need to limit those foods to lunch and dinner. Who cares what it is if it's healthy, sustains you throughout the morning, and packs in loads of vitamins and minerals? I avoid fruit because of my high yeast allergy (which is what almost all sugars break down into in the bloodstream) but that is a good add-in as well, so long as you don't overdo it. Fruit is still a sugar and too much is going to raise your insulin levels. Also, lots of people do kefir yogurt, but again, because I don't do dairy, I don't have that. It, too, is a great choice and tastes good mixed with a small amount of real fruit.
Toggle Commented May 5, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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You should read Wheat Belly. It talks about the science of GMO wheat germ which is contributing greatly to the expanding waistline of Americans.
Toggle Commented May 5, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Cathy, I just did a lot of research online. Many sites have conflicting information, but some that I use are Ultimatepaleo and PaleoHacks. NomnomPaleo Mom is another good source, as are many, many others. Once you've educated yourself enough, you can figure out whether you want to be more Paleo, more Primal (allows some dairy and sweeteners), or a combination. Also Mark Sisson is a great resource. I also have a number of great books I've read that help you work out where you want to be on the spectrum. I truly mean it when I say that you have to do what works for you. For me, I knew sugar was making me feel like crap, but I couldn't figure out how to fix it. When the doctor showed me the results, it was factual verification. It was only when I really studied the science of it, that it clicked for me and worked. Going low carb ONLY will lead to metabolic syndrome and metabolic resistance = bad news. Low carb without nutrients, fats, and protein in the right ratios will only lead to starvation mode (wherein the body fights to keep fat because it thinks it's not going to get food again) and ultimate failure. It's almost unreal for me when I sit down to eat (another BIG success factor is not eating on the run), because I have mostly veg, a great tasting protein, and delicious fats (avocados, nuts, olive oil, homemade mayo, meats, etc.). I eat slower than I used to (because I'm not ravenously hungry due to equalizing my sugar levels), I enjoy my food because I can taste it so much more, and I leave the table satisfied. I never in my entire life thought I could go between meals without eating, and I'm able to say I don't need to eat between meals anymore (or if on rare occasions I do, it's veggies or nuts or seeds), and I don't eat after dinner. Seriously. The world's greatest snacker rarely snacks anymore. It's mind-boggling and fantastic at the same time. I am peacefully resolved to the fact that I can't dabble in sugar. I can't have a little each day, both mentally, but now the results say physically as well. So, I fully committed. I decided to let the cake and cookies and candy and crap be something in my past (and I had a very successful Pastry / Wedding cake business for over 10 years!). I enjoy fruit (which is plenty sweet!) and I focus on the great foods I do eat, rather than the stuff I don't / "can't" eat. Once I started feeling the incredible effects of getting sugar /grains /dairy /processed food OUT of my diet, I no longer WANT those things. Honestly. NO ONE would have believed that could ever have been true for me. No more debilitating headaches. No more joint pain. No more freakish cravings. No more foggy thinking. No more hypoglycemia shakes when the sugar leve would crash. No more incessant snacking on healthy or processed foods. And NO.MORE.MOOD.SWINGS. That was a HUGE change I experienced. I'm just calmer in my thinking and behavior... Sugar to me is what cigarettes were for you, and alcohol is to an alcoholic. I know I need to keep it out of my life, since I now it messes with my brain center when I do. I'm not going to become extreme about it, but I have helped myself move past the obsession that I'm "giving it up forever" by knowing that once in a VERY great while (like only a few times a year), I will partake in a celebration involving sweets by having a bite or two, or sharing a little with a friend/hubby. That way, I get to enjoy it if I feel like it at that moment, and I keep my sugar issues at bay. Again, I have to say that now that I've eliminated it, it doesn't have any of the power it used to. Who cares if everyone's eating cake and ice cream. I feel like crap when I do, so why would I want to? I focus on the conversation being had, the environment I'm in, or the beauty of the moment. Food is no longer the big player in the room. I'm so sorry to ramble. Feel free to email me if you want to talk. This has changed my life THAT much....
Toggle Commented May 5, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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I do agree, Beth. It's FAR harder, but I was encouraging Cathy, because I think giving up cigarettes is one of the hardest things a person can do - from the habit perspective and the addiction factor. SO many people want to give up cigarettes, and they have the willpower, but the nicotine addiction is TOO powerful. But, I hear ya. It is EVERYWHERE - and very hidden in many places.
Toggle Commented May 5, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Sue! I couldn't agree with you more. Sugar truly is a silent killer, don't you agree? When I finally committed to making this decision, reading labels revealed frightening amounts of sugar in EVERYTHING. I'm almost incensed enough about it to take on an activist role. The food industry knows what they're doing and they're perpetuating obesity and addiction in the US population. We're all going to pay eventually with skyrocketing costs to pay for the diseases and illnesses that always eventually arise from overuse of sugar. I'll watch the link, Sue, and I agree, Cathy, you can kick sugar if you kicked cigs! I'd just be careful not to use too much sugar substitute, as it also affects insulin levels, and confuses the sugar-craving-elimination process. But, as Sue said, when you feel you REALLY need something, it's an alternative. I would also say you should resist ALL sugar AND substitutes for the first 10-14 days, at least, to remove the excess sugar in your system.
Toggle Commented May 5, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Hi Cathy - I've posted about this previously, and have to say, I'm convinced that FOR ME (i.e. I'm not judging, condoning, recommending, blah, blah, blah)I really can't do sugar. At. all. I was recently tested (MRI, RAST test, needle prick test) for allergies that caused migraine headaches that were occurring 4-5 times a week. I was at wits end. Literally. Tests came back off the chart for Candide mold. Yep. The yeast kind. Nope - I have almost no yeast infections, but at the cellular level (think blood levels, the proof was in the pudding. I am allergic to yeast (which loosely translates to sugar). Truth be told, I'm not the LEAST bit surprised as most of my diet consisted of carbs, sugar, chocolate and grains. And I still ate TONS of vegetablss at that time. Unfortunately, all the sugar (it's in EVERYTHING) was short-circuiting the good stuff... Doc suggested an elimination diet meaning no sugar, no grains (they get broken down into sugar in the bloodstream), no dairy. Pretty much Paleo - which you and I have talked about before, and which I'd dabbled in but gotten away from mainly because I couldn't figure out how to sustain it. Through these tests and the ensuing diagnosis and treatment, I'm fullycommitted to my new diet. It's not a diet anymore. It's my lifestyle now for months. I know this is going to sound crazy, but I don't eat sugar anymore. The only sugar I get is from fruits (which are eaten sparingly - a few times a week), and from natural foods. I am fully committed to Paleo eating - and I no longer have ANY cravings. I am serious. They're gone, Cathy. I NEVER in my life thought I'd be able to say that. Couple caveats: The first week of this was awful. I had a headache that was brutal, I was fuzzy, and shaky (often called low-carb flu). But, as quickly as that came about, it disappeared. Secondly, to stay healthy and regulate your sugar levels (and avoid metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance), you MUST monitor your protein (not too much or the body converts it to glucose to feed the brain) and your fat intake. I eat up to 65% of my daily calories in fats! and I'm dropping weight, feeling really good, and thinking clearer than ever. I can smell and taste things I never did before. I have NO headaches. I am eating healthy and LOVE it! Do I want cookies and cake and candy? Not from a craving perspective (those have disappeared - unbelievably!), but I will enjoy them for special occasions - Christmas, my birthday, or a very special occasion. It's changed my behaviors dramatically though. I must think ahead to prepare or have on hand, good foods that aren't sugar laden (or even laced) and drink plenty of hydrating WATER. I also take care to get good sleep, which is now no longer a problem since I dropped the sugar. I'm sleeping THROUGH the night which hadn't happened for months and months and months. If you gave up cigarettes, Cathy, you can easily give up sugar. I think both of those addictions (smoking and sugar) are sooo similar, so if anyone could do it, it would be you. Especially if you work at home and can prepare your own foods throughout the day, that's even better! I'm convinced that most of the Western world (mainly the US) is addicted to sugar. I have been there, come out the other side, and I'm convinced. Sorry for the diatribe. I'm just so convinced of this core change, that I want to share it with others. It's changed my life. Good luck, and thanks for sharing. I love coming to your blog each day.
Toggle Commented May 5, 2014 on Sugar at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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(though barely able to see the screen from laughing so hard I'm cryin'), I CONCUR!!!
Toggle Commented Jan 17, 2014 on Will it blow? at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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This is the year I get my photos in order. There. I said it. God help me. I am really, REALLY, grateful for the workflow info, Cathy. I've done more research on workflow than I can possibly reiterate. I'm tossing the high intensity, gotta-do-it-just-ONE-step-better mentality, and just gettin it done. I'm goin' all digital, but would welcome anyone's thoughts on how to manage the pre-digital photo phase. I have MULTIPLE large plastic bins of pre-digital camera photos. And some of those photos are the ones I treasure dearly. Any suggestions? Ideas? Insights into what's worked? Thanks, Cathy, for sharing your IP. I've said it before, but you need to charge for this data mine! Mary
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Great, great post, Cathy. And thanks for the links to your pre-digital recap. Happy Thanksgiving!
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awesome post. have been trying for over a year to get my digital photo workflow established. This was REALLY helpful. I'd only add one other question: How did / do you work your non-digital photos into a 'seamless' system? I have a couple of BIG boxes of non-digital photos that I want to include in a system. I am embarking on a very minimal, clean-lined approach, and don't want multiple different kinds of album spines, etc. Would you just cull like a madman, and then create a few 'pre-digi' books, or would you scan the oldies but goodies, and make a digital book? Always interested in your perspective, Cathy, as I share your love of simple expression.
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Now that was some TREAT!!!!
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2013 on Happy Halloween! at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Brenda, Had to write and say that your reflection on marriage is so great and what I,too, think it's all about. Sometimes great, sometimes not so much. Sometimes wanting to abandon, sometimes wanting to cling. We, too, are especially thankful that we 'both didn't want out at the exact same time and were willing to work on this thing called marriage'. As we come up on our 25th, with two teens at home (AGH! some days!), I am more and more grateful for the journey I've traveled with my husband. We've grown as a couple, and as individuals... Marriage isn't a place - it's a pilgrimage... Thanks for your wonderful way of saying it, Brenda, and Cathy, thanks for bringing such brevity to the cyber world - it's why I visit every day!
Toggle Commented Oct 18, 2013 on Anniversaries and such at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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Hey CZ - I get it. I know the 'man this stinks BAD, but if I whine, everyone will think I'm a.... whiner' thing you're goin thru. 12 years ago, I was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Kids were really little (1 1/2 and 3), we'd just had a house fire, and I remember sitting in my living room, sobbing like the end of the world had arrived. In many ways, for me, it seemed that way. One of the most incredible things my friend gave me,was the complete permission to lose it. I was able to sit and sob, snot running all over the place, and bawl my sorry little brains out (whoa-that pun was NOT intended). And on more than one occasion. Then, like you, I woke up after surgery, on a respirator, trying to figure out if I was still in 'this' life, or the next. (Fortunately for me,it was this life, as I often think the next life may give me what I actually deserve, and I was definitely not there). Point of the story: I was never so happy to clean a diaper, pick up toys, wash socks, do doggie duty. You name it. Did it make it all sunshine and roses? Heck no. Were that mountains to be climbed? Heck yes. Did I come out of that situation stronger, braver, more in-tune with me/my world? Heck yes. Heck yes. You sell yourself short sometimes there, Miss CZ. Creative souls like you often forget that the act of living is art itself. You share yourself with us out here in blog-o-sphere, and it makes a difference. So, I get it. Amazing what a little pin / toe can do to bring us to a standstill, or to our knees, huh? In the words of my mother, "this too shall pass". Honest to goodness, it will. In the meantime, enjoy a 'moment' or two, and keep on dragging that darn toe around. I need it.
Toggle Commented Sep 19, 2013 on What I wanted to say at Cathy Zielske's Blog
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