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Rickard Elimää
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A super interesting topic. I've been thinking and reading up on this but came to a halt due to university studies. Will have to get my hands on this article. :)
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2016 on The Aesthetic Motives of Play at ihobo
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I admit that I'm having a hard time understanding this, but isn't Foucault talking about what we now call »emergence«? About how different components (statements) together, in a system (network), form an emerging result when interacting. A result that cannot be traced like lines on a map?
Toggle Commented Jun 27, 2015 on Foucault's Archaeology (2): Discourse at Only a Game
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My mom said I was going to accomplish great deeds in my life. I didn't know it was going to be so soon.
Toggle Commented Jun 26, 2014 on Taking the Lead! at Only a Game
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Got this blog in my rss feed together with all the other game related blogs. And what have I been doing? Taking some major steps in my model in how someone can create engagement.
Toggle Commented Jun 26, 2014 on Taking the Lead! at Only a Game
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I want to create art, and I do that by placing a paper bag on the ground. --- When I read about Kendall Walton, I instantly thought of what I read over at Psychology of Games where, to be able to understand something, you will try to put in in a context; to create a story. Marianne Simmel and Fritz Heider shows this by the following clip (90 sec long): Heider-Simmel Demonstration What I find interesting about these what-is-art/game discussions is what I feel that what people really trying to define is "what good art". To me, my paper bag is art because I said so, but I would never claim that it's good art. When people say "That's not a game", what they really mean is probably "That's not how I play games". It' a exclusive way of seeing things, and by being exclusive, you actually prevent innovation in that area. If someone says it's a game, it's a game. Try to learn from that perspective. To understand it. Sure, you can question it but only to get an understanding. Perhaps you realize that it's not how you play a game, and then can be dismissive, but at least you learned a new perspective.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2014 on The Value of Art at Only a Game
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I'm a little confused by both your and Dan's standpoints. It seems like you don't think fiction is a wrapper to games. It seems like you and Dan agree but disagree about your arguments. We just something similar over at Story Games. What that thread starts from is what Greg Costikyan said more than ten years ago, that games and "story" can't be combined. I think the thing that messes up people's mind when it comes to fiction and games is this old rag: "rules vs. fiction", when it should say this: "fiction as rules" or "rules for fiction". This corresponds to the conclusions that we drew in the linked thread above. --- I also think that you need a certain medium for "fiction as rules" to happen. Tabletop roleplaying games can create this, but I'm hesitant if I will ever see a computer- or a boardgame to be able to do this.
Toggle Commented Mar 19, 2014 on The Rules of Game Worlds at ihobo
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You wrote in an article on Gamasutra about uncertainty and how it creates curiosity, and that article made me read about Thomas M. Malaby and his four continuances: stochastic, social, performative and semiotic. Another person who writes about uncertainties is Marc LeBlanc. I have made collection of both their lists in this post. According to this theory, the way to engage learners’ curiosity is to present just enough information to make their existing knowledge seem incomplete, inconsistent, or unparsimonious. If I compare incomplete, inconsistent and unparsimonious to both LeBlanc's and Malaby's uncertainties, I would come up with something as the following. Incomplete: incomplete information (LeBlanc) Inconsistent: [no comparison?] Unparsimonious: Semiotic contingency (Malaby) and complexity (LeBlanc) I read the comments above, but it seems like you're talking about the game text being sparse. While that can be true, I think it can also be about drowning the participants in information that they need sort it out first, or see how it works while playing it. Compare this to a puzzle that has two pieces and a puzzle that has a thousand pieces. I would be glad to read more about inconsistence and unparsimonious. Those two categories intrigues me.
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2014 on Malone on Curiosity at Only a Game
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Yes, you're totally right in that all rewards are nothing more than feedback. Feedback loops (improv term) or reinforcement and mirroring, as it's also been called in freeform circles, shouldn't be that hard to create in digital media. All structural story design that I've come over in digital media have been built up through a tree-like structure. I wonder how hard it would be to instead build a relationship map with reactive relations and active agendas, where a response is triggered when the relations are dabbled with. I've written an article about the fishtank model on how to build mysteries in TTRPGs. I don't think it would be hard to design a computer game in the same way.
Toggle Commented Jan 27, 2013 on Designing Rewards in Games at Only a Game
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Jan 24, 2013