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Scott J. Epstein
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I think for scientists, A is easy, in no small part because of the likelihood of getting a certain kind of free trip to Sweden for it...?
John, In that case I would say that Gutting's framing leaves out discussion of the socio-economic and racial undercurrents that seem to partly inform some Tea Party stances and tactics. Actually, come to think of it, the same could be said of the approaches to the "Security State." Actually, come to think of it, I think Nicholas Kristoff, in the same newspaper, did, in comparing the Security State to gun background checks: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/04/opinion/kristof-how-could-we-blow-this-one.html?ref=opinion&_r=0
Dennis, (An aside: I think throwing out pejoratives—even if applied to a statement rather than a person—undermines your argument.) I am referring to looking at where people go—in public, on the Internet; who they call; and not the content of those communications. American police do intensive observation—"stake outs" routinely, and they also obtain phone logs routinely. All without warrants. We also have cameras in public places—the main difference being that police cameras in public places aren't hidden but right out in the open and usually emblazoned with (for example) the NYPD or MTA (for toll booths) logo. My point, on a factual basis, is that people ought to be aware that when they're on the Internet, they're in a public square, just like a real public square. The main difference being that the real camera announces itself.
Mark, I would point you to the kerfuffle started by Alice Walker over Alicia Keys playing Tel Aviv as an example, in particular that Ms. Walker in her comments there and elsewhere does not seem to separate herself from those calling for "Palestine" from the Jordan to the Mediterranean.
Eric, Second point first: I agree. First point... The Fourth Amendment gives the right "to be secure in [our] persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures" etc. Says nothing about prohibiting people-watching. And I think there's a lot of case law that permits people-watching. You might not like it, but that doesn't make it criminal. That people like Snowden can A) Get security clearance and B) Access the contents of communications without warrants, OTOH, does disturb me.
Two pieces of information to add some context. 1. When you go out on the Internet, you are going out in public, even if it doesn't seem so. When you mail a letter, it goes out in public (the envelope, at least). When one has that perspective, and one expects to be observable in these situations, one is less shocked by these "revelations," IMHO. 2. It seems to me that there are a lot of anti-Israel sorts who seem to think that "the Territories" stretch to the Mediterranean, and that Tel Aviv is on "occupied territory." Not all, maybe not most. But it seems to me that people aren't careful about the distinction, where probably they should be.
I have always preferred Stanley Lieber's approach to the ubermensch question. Which is: "With great power, comes great responsibility." And, yes, I once did consider writing a paper on this as a particularly American—and Jewish American—approach to this question...
Scanned the paper. Seems not to look at disciplines that need really large and expensive equipment. Like electron microscopes. Or Large Hadron Colliders.
Would also be interesting to look at COUNTER usage. Which after all is a big part of how Librarians evaluate journals...
Eric, It might also be interesting to compare these citations against, say, market research of which journals in the field are "top of mind;" that is, which journals to people read/scan/browse when they're not doing specific research? And this sort of "those who have, get" feedback loop is well known. And it can be dealt with, but takes a lot of effort and a lot of time...
And in fact one can apply all of this equally well to the aspiring fiction—or any other kind of non-academic writer—as well...
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Apr 25, 2013