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NitWitCharmer
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"Nationally, voter turnout was lowest in 70 years." For an election in which the presidency was not at stake the turnout was one of the highest in years.
Toggle Commented Nov 27, 2014 on Slow clap for the campaign consultants at EdCone.com
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Being that it's unexpected, it's easy for Brod to deny the Secular Inquisition...
Democrats circa 1940: 'Your wrongness on this issue is stunning. No [Black Americans] are being robbed of their [cultural] liberty. If they don't feel they can do the job [due to cultural] conviction, they can quit with their convictions intact. They don't have a right to those jobs, after all.'
Yes, I see a lot of that sort of thing. Even the print sets the adverts apart from the news such as it is.
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2014 on A mess of pottage at EdCone.com
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Possibly. I tend to be overly skeptical at times.
Toggle Commented Jul 2, 2014 on A mess of pottage at EdCone.com
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As to my comment about unAmerican Democrats Rasmussen notes that Democrats are at this point 58% unAmerican. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Democrats think the president should take action alone if Congress does not approve his proposals. Americans prefer our Constitutional Republic. Democrats prefer change, something different, something unAmerican.
Toggle Commented Jul 1, 2014 on Chronicle of many deaths foretold at EdCone.com
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Do you see it as a short term advantage/long term loss for the NR? As to whether it's the best use of AG's money, I wonder if, as has been mentioned, the NR's readership crosses over with the high-end art crowd, why shouldn't AG advertise where their market is? Just as it would do little good for AG to advertise in the Morehead City market, it would do little good for AG to advertise in the Greensboro's tractor-pull market.
Toggle Commented Jul 1, 2014 on A mess of pottage at EdCone.com
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I get the sense that the NR is trading on our assumption that it is something that it no longer is. General Motors did something similar in the 70's and 80's. Badge engineering. Those who thought the new GM was still the old GM continued buying Cadillacs despite the fact that Caddillacs were nothing more than OldsmaBuicks and Pontiacs with different badging. While this was profitable in the 70s and 80's, today only the oldest among us think of Cadillac as the truly high-end Rolls Royce competitor it once was. In short, GM cashed in on a reputation earned over the previous 50 years. So is the NR.
Toggle Commented Jun 30, 2014 on A mess of pottage at EdCone.com
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Jim:Do we need to remind him that Democrat Truman was president from 1945-53, and there was a largely bipartisan foreign policy ("Politics stops at the waters edge") from 1953 until the Vietnam conflict divided the nation in the mid to late 1960s? No, I don't need that reminder. As I said: "Sadly, if today's Democrats, who no longer believe America is a force for good, had been in power after WWII Germany and Japan could well have followed the path Democrats have directed Iraq toward." We are talking a different sets of Democrats. One set that had faith in liberty and another more modern but less enlightened set that does not. As to Vietnam, Vietnam was the first war Democrats lost for America but successfully deflected blame toward America as a whole. Today we see that again. Obama is losing Iraq but Democrats are saying America can't impose its will on another nation. Ed said: "These adventures are bound to go wrong." The reality is that bringing liberty to another nation is only seen as an imposition by Democrats. And the real question is why? Why have Democrats lost their faith in American liberty?
Toggle Commented Jun 28, 2014 on Chronicle of many deaths foretold at EdCone.com
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I wasn't commenting about the desire for self governance, Foreclosure Attorney. I was commenting about something you should recognize as valuable, the concepts of Rule of Law, property rights and later functional consensus based governance. Britain got these right, passed them on to their colonies and their colonies benefited. How do nations that were once French colonies measure up against those that were once British? Throw the Spanish and Dutch colonies in there as well. None matched the success of British colonies. Heck one British colony went on to successfully build nations as well. The US. No, we didn't have colonies but we had Germany and Japan, both of which we built, both of which have succeeded, both of which are democratic, and both of which are Allies. Sadly, if today's Democrats, who no longer believe America is a force for good, had been in power after WWII Germany and Japan could well have followed the path Democrats have directed Iraq toward. The sad truth is that Democrats no longer believe in America. There is a word for that... unAmerican. Again I ask, will the next president be left with a better Iraq or a worse Iraq than the Iraq Obama was gifted? The answer is a worse Iraq and that is the result of the unAmericansim that finds a home in the Democrat heart. The simple fact is that the hard work in Iraq was done by Bush, all you guys had to do was support democracy and liberty in a foreign land ... but you couldn't. It's no longer within you.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Chronicle of many deaths foretold at EdCone.com
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Each are recognized as better off than their non-colonized neighbors, though I would agree that the non-colonized neighbors fared better than those that were colonized by European nations other than England.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Chronicle of many deaths foretold at EdCone.com
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"These adventures are bound to go wrong." Not only historians, but the nations of Japan and Germany would disagree. As would, for that matter, the majority of nations that were crafted by the British Empire. Canada, Singapore, Hong Kong (city-state? Chinese whatever...), Australia, United States, India, South Africa, etc. Is Thomas channeling Hartzman today?
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Chronicle of many deaths foretold at EdCone.com
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;)
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Chronicle of many deaths foretold at EdCone.com
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Will the next president be left with a better Iraq or a worse Iraq than the Iraq Obama was gifted? When Bush exited office he left Obama a peaceful democratic ally and a multitude of choices of what best to do going forward in Iraq. That multitude of choices were the result of good foreign policy. Today Obama has no good choices. That is the result of a poor foreign policy in regard to Iraq. What is apparent to even the most casual observer is that it is Obama who lacks a coherent and positive exit strategy in Iraq... not Bush. Going forward... We first need to understand the connection between, premature full military withdrawal, the chaos in Iraq today and poor Democrat foreign policy in regard to Iraq that has lead us to a point where even Democrats admit there are "no good solutions". If there is any solution it is to vote Democrats out of office for pursuing a foreign policy that distills to "peace for me but not for thee is the only peace that matters." Clearly that is not the case. While America withdraws from Iraq and indeed throughout the world chaos has fills our vacuum. The world is not better off, we are not safer as a nation, and Democrats are at fault. The fact is that despite the Democrat notion that America is evil, America is a force for good in the world without which chaos follows.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Chronicle of many deaths foretold at EdCone.com
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Were the Y2K fears conservative in nature? Seemed fairly bipartisan to me.
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I believe what Heasley is noting is that the Anti Trust Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act have done more to protect select monopolies than they have done to protect others from those monopolies. Would Ma Bell have been Ma Bell for so long without government protection for that particular monopoly? Unlikely. Nothing protects a monopoly like government. Brod: One can make similar arguments regarding monoposony. What are they?
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2014 on Fight the powers that be at EdCone.com
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Yours appears to be a defense of monopolies assuming they are the playthings of the state. No surprise there as that only benefits the state and progressive notions of state. But, hey, if it can be rationalized that single seller is a public good when milked within the state sandbox, why not single payer?
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2014 on Fight the powers that be at EdCone.com
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We had a natural monopoly that was vigorously defended by progressives in the telephone industry. It was broken up. We are better off. We have a natural monopoly in electricity production in which consumers have a single choice in provider while providers, in the event they are unable to meet the needs of their customers, can buy electricity from other providers. End users should be able to do the same. That we can not, you claim, is a good thing. I disagree. Electrons are electrons, who cares who pumps them into the grid as long as they are the cheapest ... rich social cost shoppers aside. --- For example, in R&D-intensive industries, monopoly can be the best way to ensure sustained innovation. Where?
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2014 on Fight the powers that be at EdCone.com
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While you laboriously battle monopoly when no one argues for the need of single seller, you whimsically embrace monopsony and argue for the need of single payer. Each are as bad as the other unless one is an unAmerican progressive or an irrational economist.
Toggle Commented Jun 16, 2014 on Fight the powers that be at EdCone.com
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A study by the Institute for Geophysics UTA is produced by scientists driven by their desire to not be baffled concluded: Our results further suggest that the subglacial water systems of the Thwaites Glacier may be responding to heterogeneous and temporarily variable basal melting driven by the evolution of rift-associated volcanism and support the hypothesis that both heterogeneous and geothermal flux and local magmatic processes could be critical factors in determining the future behavior of the WAIS. Baffled scientists produce science while cock-sure scientists produce AGW politics...
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2014 on Canute visits the Outer Banks at EdCone.com
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"...the ACA is a good start." While the ACA has helped a select few, it has harmed the whole of America. The ACA is a Bad start ... a dead end from which to turn. Ask a vet.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2014 on Dear Pat at EdCone.com
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But if this is Yves Smith, it sounds like she's arguing for single payer. That's an argument to which I'm sympathetic. Call it what it is ... monopsony.
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2014 on Dear Pat at EdCone.com
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Brod:More would have insurance? That prediction has been borne out by most of the data we've seen so far. '...but only because so much of the ACA has been delayed. You were right! But so very wrong.' And I don't recall you arguing that the ACA would raise costs in absolute terms, nor do I recall you arguing that the ACA would increase ER visits in absolute terms. Your position regarding the ACA appears to have changed.
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2014 on Dear Pat at EdCone.com
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Yes, insurance. My fault.
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2014 on Dear Pat at EdCone.com
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Just as nature has not met the predictions of climate scientists, the state of healthcare under the ACA has not met the rosy predictions of ACA supporters. Each of you have been wrong. By contrast, realists in the TeaParty predicted both correctly. The TeaParty was especially correct in regard to the ACA. From keeping your doctor and plan to saving $2500/year the TeaParty was right. You were wrong. You predicted that ER visits would drop under the ACA. They have risen. You predicted that America would save money under the ACA. It has not. You predicted that more people would have under the ACA... and there are, but only because so much of the ACA has been delayed. You were right! But so very wrong. A realist would conclude that if the only time your predictions are correct is when the ACA is delayed then we are better off without the ACA. A realist you are not. Like climate scientists you cling to your credentials and your statistics while denying nature itself. Reality has spoken not only to climate scientists, but to you; your educations have failed each of you. Perhaps a round of self education is in order.
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2014 on Dear Pat at EdCone.com
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