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Julian Williams
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Very interesting - I have become hooked on medieval art: What strikes me is the imagery which conflates a world where extreme brutality is never far away with a yearning for morality. In these times "art" was very powerful and so much more relevant to life than the contemporary and modern art promoted by Saatchi.
I came across this snail on a rabbit's arm pretending to be a hawk Most probably a monk's amusing fantasy http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ojVl5LUtfr0/Us1vAL3IDZI/AAAAAAAABxk/PM0OIsRzjGI/s1600/bunny+hunter.jpg
Toggle Commented Jan 8, 2014 on Knight v Snail at Medieval manuscripts blog
I found this quote about hedgehogs on the Medieval Bestiery site ( http://bestiary.ca/) : St Antony of Padua [12th-13th century CE] (Sermons): Sinners are compared to hedgehogs. Note that the hedgehog is altogether full of prickles; and if any one tries to take it, it rolls itself up, and becomes as it were a ball in the hand of the holder. Its head and its mouth are set low down, and inside its mouth are five teeth. The hedgehog is the obstinate sinner, covered all over with the prickles of sins. If you endeavour to convince him of the sin he has committed, he immediately rolls himself up, and hides, by excusing, his fault. And thus it may be said that his head and mouth are set low down. By the head, we understand, the thoughts; by the mouth, the words. While the sinner excuses himself with respect to the sin he has done, what else is it than that he bows his mind and his words down to the ground? Whence also he is said to have five teeth in his mouth, which are the five kinds of excuses that are found in the mouth of the obstinate. For, when he is blamed, he excuses himself either by ignorance or chance, or the suggestion of the devil, or the frailty of his flesh, or the occasion given by his neighbour. (Mediæval preachers and mediæval preaching: A series of extracts, translated from the sermons of the middle ages, chronologically arranged; with notes and an introduction (London, 1856)
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Jan 7, 2014