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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò
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Thanks for the response Matt. And I do agree with the basic premise of your point - Marx is making a philosophical move here in thinking there must be some C that explains the math of exchange between goods A and B. I'd call it "commensurability" rather than "unifying" -that there's some respect in which they are quantitatively comparable, which doesn't imply that they are the same or 'together' in the way that unifying might - but maybe I'm nitpicking since your word choice doesn't rule that out. Anyways I share your obsession with this point, which AJ Julius put me on to - I really don't know what's going on either in the Aristotle or the Marx here. why isn't it possible that prices are just bullshit, that we exchange quantities of some stuff for definite quantities of other stuff but there's no law that makes that rational or explains how much stuff we exchange for other stuff - all prices are the results of what we do, they aren't guided by anything. Marx's rationale for ignoring this possibility, as far as I can tell really seems to be "...but that would be dumb" - but maybe it is (and we are)!
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Why Everything Costs Money Part 15 [Capital Volume I, Chapters 30-32, pgs. 908-940 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 14 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume 1. See a... Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 14 [Capital Volume I, Chapters 26-29, pgs. 870-908 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 14 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Sep 5, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 13 [Capital Volume I, Chapter 25, pgs. 762-870 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 12 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Sep 4, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 12 [Capital Volume I, Chapters 23-24, pgs. 708-761 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 12 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 30, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 11 [Capital Volume I, Chapter 19-22, pgs. 675-706 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 11 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 10 [Capital Volume I, Chapters 16-18, pgs. 643-672 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 10 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 28, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 9 [Capital Volume I, Chapter 15, pgs. 491-639 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 8 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 26, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 8 [Capital Volume I, Chapters 12-14, pgs. 428-491 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 8 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 25, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Why Everything Costs Money Part 7 Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò [Capital Volume I, Chapters 10-11, pgs. 340-426 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 7 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 24, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 6 [Capital Volume I, Chapters 8-9, pgs. 306-339 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 6 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 22, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 5 [Capital Volume I, Chapter 7, pgs. 283-306 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 5 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 21, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 4 [Capital Volume I, Chapters 4-6, pgs. 244-280, of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 4 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 19, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 3 [Capital Volume I, Chapter 3, pgs. 188-244 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 3 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 2 [Capital Volume I, Chapter 2, pgs. 178-187 of Penguin Press] Marx for folks who aren’t trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Part 2 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume... Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Part 1 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume 1. Marx for folks who aren't trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing better to do. Continue on to Part 1 here, and access free electronic copies of Volume 1 here... Continue reading
Posted Aug 16, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Why Everything Costs Money Part 1 [Capital Volume I, Chapter 1: The Commodity, pgs. 126-177 of Penguin Press] Part 1 of an ongoing series of posts going through Capital Volume 1. Marx for folks who aren't trying to read 900 damn pages, by someone who has nothing... Continue reading
Posted Aug 16, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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[Pictured: Valerie Castile, mother of the murdered Philando Castile, with her arm around a fellow marcher, holding a "Justice for Justine" sign. Photo from The Guardian] Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Son of Baldwin doesn't give a fuck about Justine Damond, and, apparently, neither should you. Who's Son of Baldwin? He is... Continue reading
Posted Jul 22, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
"And perhaps they are different on average in certain personality traits, characteristics, or life histories. But so what?" But this doesn't seem like an ad hoc distinction for Blanchard, at least based on your summary, he seems to think other things co-vary in a meaningful way (age at beginning of transition, and apparently rates of autogynephila). Maybe "fundamental" is too far, fair point, but it doesn't seem like this choice comes out of nowhere. But I also wonder if you're hearing alarm bells that I'm not hearing. Would this be dangerous for folks if it is? I would've thought the biggest danger is the relationship between this kind of judgement and other important medical decisions like elgibility for HRT and surgery but you say here that that isn't a factor. Plus, if your critique of mainstream trans discourse goes through it seems to me like autogynephilia would be even more of a harmless concept. But, obviously, very open to being wrong about all of that.
Thanks anon. To go one by one: 1) "Almost all of the philosophical work in feminist philosophy I most admire intellectually, and which has meant the most to me personally, has been work that could be termed 'reinventing the wheel': what it does is in some sense, translate, make precise, and make (to me) more intelligible theories, ideas, approaches, and so on, which had been floating around in feminist theory for ages." I agree that intellectual translation is an intellectual achievement, and a socially important one. But what you describe here doesn't match what I was attempting to describe. Translating something, I take it, is taking something that has already been said, figuring out what it means, and saying it to a third person in a way that will illuminate things for that third person. That is different from the sort of Columbusing sort of 'discovery' of a topic that I'm shitting on, because translation is premised on not only a pre-existing thing (whatever is getting translated, even if it is translated critically or cleaned up along the way) but accountability to that pre-existing thing (again, even if the stance is critical or revisionary). 2) I think you make a good point here. I agree that it's pedagogically useful for an individual student to find some things out for one's self, and that complicates some of the other things. But its unclear what the collective analogue of that is at the level of a whole discipline, and also how this pedagogical point interacts with considerations of credit and intellectual history. Our practices around discussing the origin of ideas would have to shift dramatically to accomodate this approach to things in any even minimally just way. When liberals narrate the history of the intellectual 'discovery' of the deep wrongness of racial slavery around political elites and lettered folks 3) I don't think we disagree here given that I'm pro-translation 4) I don't think anyone's position in the debates is to "stop abstracting" and I think that's a pernicious sort of weakmanning of the arguments against ideal theory (and I say that as someone who disagrees with said arguments) 5) I mean, there does seem to be a tension between those two things but neither of them describe how I think about philosophy. Not to sound like a fiscal conservative or whatever but what exactly counts in favor of the second one as a characterization of *professional philosophy* specifically? If it really is primarily for the cultivation and gratification of the people in the club then why should the public pay for this?
Dave, Yeah, it sounds like we agree, though hopefully the time frame will be shorter for, say, the social sciences. And that more or less jives with how I think the norm should work - whether a formal or informal approach to the Kid in the Hot Seat norm makes sense depends on what the field is like, and your approach of finding the good apples sounds like a good one to me. __, "In my experience it makes it more likely that it’ll be rejected for bad reasons at the behest of incompetent reviewers, which is devastating enough for most practical purposes." That's definitely a concern as well, though being accepted for bad reasons is more the sort of case I had in mind here.
Dave, Thanks for engaging. I concede that the norm demands fairness and genuine intellectual curiosity from other departments, which is a bit rosy of a picture of things. After all it's not like philosophy is the only discipline where professional norms distort interactions. That said, I can't imagine that our willingness to pronounce our opinions from our lofty station in Plato's Heaven, without considering ourselves accountable to them or their work - or, worse, assigning them research projects: how many times have you heard a philosopher say "working out this implication is an empirical matter that I leave to the x-ologists"? - helps things. Indeed, I'm not sure that the opinion of our field is quite as unwarranted as it might look like to us, though all I need to convince you of us that it's partially sustained by the lack of the kinds of interactions (and the expectations thereof) the norm wants to cement. I think the Kid in the Hot Seat norm as a genuine disciplinary expectation rather than the occasional event would be the kind of show of good faith that would invite fairness, but if I'm wrong about that, it would at least,make it true that it is genuinely that other discipline's fault and not ours.
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aka Kid in a Candy Store 2: Electric Boogaloo* A new philosophy journal article is ruffling some feathers. On the one hand, whatever. I don't actually feel strongly about the subject of the article or even about this this or that argumentative move made in the article, so I decided... Continue reading
Posted Apr 28, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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By Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Another sexual harassment allegation of a high profile philosophy professor, John Searle, is making the rounds. There are plenty of sordid details among the allegations, a particularly damning one being the allegation that Jennifer Hudin, director of the John Searle Center for Social Ontology (yes, seriously)... Continue reading
Posted Mar 24, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations
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By Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò Over 1 in 100 people in the United States took to the streets on Saturday, January 21st, for the women's march in protest of the election of now President Donald J. Trump. These protests were joined by y number of sister protests around the world, sending... Continue reading
Posted Jan 27, 2017 at Philosophical Percolations