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QueenOfCrows
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WOW. That is amazing! A job like this would have driven me batty, as I would have had to constantly fight off the urge to just unplug a whole side at once. It looks so tidy and organized now <3
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Correcting my hastily-typed errors: *wedding set/s/ sound gorgeous - /and/ sapphires are beautiful.
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Your wedding set sounds gorgeous - sapphires are so beautiful! Such commentary on your jewelry is inappropriate and uncalled-for. She has no idea why one set is silver and the other gold - could be financial, sentimental, personal, or allergic reasons - and it's none of her business. I can see someone letting such dismissive and judgemental words slip out once - once! - but after being called on it, she should have zipped her lip. And as you know, it's not the price that counts; it's the heart behind it. When my fiance proposed, he knew I'd rather pick out my own ring, but he didn't want to propose 'empty-handed', so he made me a ring. As we are both artists, and we have a kind of inside joke about coins between us, he made this 'engagement proposal ring' out of...a nickel. Just a simple solid band that he'd fashioned out of a small coin. I knew he was going to propose, but I cried with joy when I saw that ring. I wore that ring day in and day out for several months until I picked out my gold-and-diamond permanent engagement ring. Now the first engagement ring is tucked away safely in my jewelry box. But you better believe that mottled band is worth far, far more to me than nearly anything else in that box. And anyone who laughs at my five cent engagement ring is disrespecting the entire relationship it stands for.
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Pocari Sweat is one of my favorite beverages! It's got a great name, and it tastes like watermelon Gatorade :)
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Your manager was badass, but you -- you! -- are BADASS. You so rock.
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This looks exactly like the impeccablly tidy grocer's we shop at in Langley, BC, Canada. It always looks like that -- I think a staff member does loops through the store straightening things all the time :)
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It is very rare that I read something one the internet that makes me cry. This story really upset me. I am so, so sorry you went through this traumatizing experience. My heart goes out to you and I want to wrap you up in the biggest of hugs. I am not surprised that you are still upset by this -- though I think "upset" is an understatement. The correct word is more likely "traumatized." My partner is a highranking first responder who has many times had to deal with dead bodies and various gruesome situations. When I told him your story, he looked horrified and furious, and said to let you know that if any of his crews were to encounter such a situation as you did, they would immediately be put through PTSD treatment. These people are professionally trained in dealing with all kinds of horror-movie-type gruesome situations including all manner of maimed and killed bodies, and even they will be traumatized by such a situation. It is wellknown within their industry that any incident involving children, babies, or fetuses is exponentially more traumatic than anything involving just adults. So the fact that you were upset by this, and are probably likely still upset by it, does not surprise me. Of course you didn't call 911 -- from your description of your actions and emotions, it sounds like you were in shock. I'm not talking "shocked', like 'ZOMG WTF' -- I mean actual medical shock, which results from being exposed to a physical or psychological trauma that is so intense that the mind and/or body kinda misfires like a short-circuited fuse. Of course you weren't thinking clearly -- of course you were randomly crying. That's a normal response -- but the fact that you had to deal with that situation in the first place is neither normal, or acceptable -- or even legal. This is part of the reason why your supervisors should have called 911 immediately -- not just so you didn't have to deal with the yuckiness, or even because first responders would follow all the proper legal procedures in dealing with an abandoned fetus, but also because it is part of first response protocol to instigate post-traumatic care for anyone affected -- in this case, including yourself. When it comes to how we psychologically and emotionally respond to icky things, a dead fetus is *not* the same as a stillborn calf or a gruesome roadkill. My better half is steel-spined in dealing with all manner of horrific things (people injured in car accidents, housefires, industrial accidents, etc) -- but he still has nightmares years later about a certain car accident that involved small children. I do not know the employment laws in your area, but here in Canada psychological injury due to a traumatic experience in the workplace is covered by Worker's Compensation. And I don't know when this incident happened, but if it was anytime in the last few years, I highly recommend reporting it to whatever "employment law" higher governing group there is, and ask what resources are available to you. You may want to get a lawyer. This situation is no different than if, say, your bosses had forced you to do a task that resulted in your leg being broken, then you quit because you couldn't stand up, and they did nothing to compensate you or apologize or acknowledge their errors but instead treated you like crap. Above all, I strongly recommend seeking psychological help. Not because I think you're weak or broken or anything -- because as the wife of a first responder, I know all too well how such incidents affect even the most well-trained professional. My guy goes to a shrink monthly to deal with such stressors. Don't brush it off and think you've just "gotten over it" or "it'll be fine." And your store manager should have simply told A to call 911. A store manager is not trained in dealing with such biohazards, the legalities of disposing of a body, or the medical ramifications of there being some woman out there who could be hemorrhaging to death (miscarriages aren't as "tidy" or harmless as a sneeze) -- but they should know that if they encounter a situation that they haven't received training on, they should call someone who *can* deal with it. "A" at least knew to call the boss. She in turn should have known to call the authorities, rather than insisting an 18-year-old deal with it. I want to emphasize that you did nothing wrong. You were in shock. You were forced into a situation that would be horrific to even a trained professional. You did something very admirable and necessary -- quit immediately, and stuck to your guns in stating your reason for leaving. I applaud the fact that you stated it loudly while within earshot of customers! I cannot emphasize how important it is that you take care of yourself and allow yourself to be angry, upset, sad, whatever, when thinking about this incident, even if it has been a long time since it happened. That's normal, and expected. *biggest hugs*
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Jan 3, 2016