This is Bernard Corden's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Bernard Corden's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Bernard Corden
Brisbane
Recent Activity
"If there were no bad people there would be no good lawyers" - Charles Dickens
1 reply
Dear Phil - I also notice the Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business has crawled from beneath her rock and was recently pictured beside our evangelist leader following a prolonged period of silence. Every time her mouth opens it sounds like a Scotland Road (low provenance Liverpool UK thoroughfare) fishwife snorting shabu.
1 reply
Dear Phil, Michael et al - Another two fascinating minds that are worth exploring are Eric Hobsbawm and Christopher Caudwell: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Hobsbawm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Caudwell
1 reply
I quite like Giroux because much of his work aligns with Paulo Freire and many of the other free schoolers such as Howard Gardner, Parker J Palmer, Guy Claxton and Ivan Illich. And as the late Albert Camus once remarked...…"Always go too far because that's where you'll find the truth". If you find his work too radical another fascinating mind is Basarab Nicolescu with his trans-disciplinary approach, which explores "The Hidden Third" and the fecund middle ground between the objective and subjective. This includes poetics, spirituality and metanoia and accepts the coexistence of multiple contradictions and realities, some of which are unfamiliar to the physical sciences. It seeks to liberate reason from a positivist domain and covers the unfathomable realities of complex wicked problems, which are beleaguered with paradox and ambiguity: https://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Third-Basarab-Nicolescu/dp/0997301406 It is conducive to bohemian disciplines and does not merely accommodate the validity of another profession for the sake of appeasement. People from every walk of life or multiple realities can enter this milieu and their perspectives are encouraged. It welcomes discernment, which can temporarily reconcile contradictions and respect emergence, synergy and fusion. This aligns with the thoughts of Albert Einstein who once said.... "Objective knowledge provides us with powerful instruments for the achievements of certain ends but the ultimate goal itself and the longing to reach it must come from another source". This was also reflected by Wilhelm Reich..."Scientific theory is a contrived foothold in the chaos of living phenomena". The intent is not unity but a collective coherence that confronts the many formidable challenges, which include volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. The trans-disciplinary process regurgitates many traditional polemics such as science versus religion and the arts or humanities. Science is unable to explain everything but this does not mean it knows nothing. It recognises enough to describe Newtonian and nuclear physics although……When we understand every single secret of the universe, the eternal enigma of the human heart will remain. Trans-disciplinarity seeks an alternative way of knowing, which has been termed metanoia or a knowing beyond. It faces many extraordinary challenges, especially from the academic tradition of establishing and sustaining disciplines, which constrains synergy and retards growth and enrichment. Integration of scientific disciplines with subjects such as poetics or religion will undoubtedly continue to encounter resistance and the lyrics from the late George Harrison resonate.... "And the time will come when you see we're all one and life flows on within you and without you". It is traditional to look upon science and religion as irreconcilable adversaries. Indeed, science has been charged, somewhat irrationally with undermining morality. Ethical behaviour should be based on the social context, sympathy and education and any religious basis is unnecessary. It would be an impoverished and interminable state of affairs if humans were restrained by fear of punishment and hopes of reward after death. Indeed an intellectual, heartless man can never become inspired.
1 reply
I find Henry Giroux much more interesting than Jordan Peterson's turgid sludge: https://truthout.org/authors/henry-a-giroux/
1 reply
Dear Arthur - Speaking of Shakespeare reminds me of a fabulous response from Sir Ian McKellan during a Richard III performance. A mobile phone went off in the audience during the Winter of Discontent soliloquy and he replied:....."If that's for me, tell them I'm busy" and merely continued with the act.
1 reply
Neil Postman's book entitled "Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business", which was published back in 1985 is well worth reading: https://quote.ucsd.edu/childhood/files/2013/05/postman-amusing.pdf Andrew Keen's "Cult of the Amateur" is another fascinating book and is supplemented via his TechCrunch blog: https://techcrunch.com/author/andrew-keen/
1 reply
"An editor is someone who separates the wheat from the chaff and prints the chaff" - Adlai Stevenson
1 reply
PS Programs such as Walker Texas Ranger, The Block, MKR, The Voice or any of the TVSN or horse racing channels have far more integrity and credibility.
1 reply
Just a quick glance and listen to the formulaic sludge and infotainment or newzak churned out by ABC and SBS television, which is depicted as news or even journalism provides sufficient substantive evidence. The ABC, especially its Breakfast News, 7:30 Report, Four Corners and Insiders programs were once considered professional but have recently degenerated into passive vicarious entertainment following the appointment of the late Kerry Packer's squeeze.
1 reply
Great work, Joseph. At our schools, what are our children taught? Are they told of the battles our people fought? Are they told of how our people died? Are they told why our people cried? Our true history is never read but the black man keeps it in his head "It's easy to write the history, all the eyewitnesses are dead" - Ljupka Cvetanova (The New Land) Here is another interesting piece: https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/10/08/the-political-realities-of-science-at-work/
1 reply
How can an organisation be ethical if its only corporate social responsibility is to make a profit? Coles and Woolworths response to plastic shopping bags has merely involved commodification of the problem. and socialising any expense. The entrepreneurial and buccaneering US oil industry tycoon, John D Rockefeller somewhat predictably embraced a laissez faire spirit towards disasters, which encouraged the transformation of adversity into opportunity. This commodification was reflected following the World Trade Centre attack in the financial district of downtown Manhattan. A dedicated memorial features twin commemorative pools and has lured over 30 million visitors since its inauguration in 2011. The not for profit venture with its beguiling complementary museum officially opened in 2014 and attracts almost 9,000 people each day. A $69 admission fee generates over $200 million each year although the cost of fitting aircraft cockpits with substantial doors and strong latches was a modest $3,000 per plane.
1 reply
Worth a read: https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/10/05/culture-and-politics-culture-and-capitalism/
1 reply
“If we can find the money to kill people, we can find the money to help people.” - Tony Benn
1 reply
Isn't divorce and real estate underpinned by the same ideology?
1 reply
"One of the necessary accompaniments of capitalism in a democracy is political corruption" - Upton Sinclair https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/10/01/the-root-problem-is-the-capitalist-system/
1 reply
The late CP Snow raised this issue via his controversial 'Two Cultures Rede' lecture back in the 1950s, recently rekindled by Baroness Onora O'Neill. The positivism, structuralism and scientism of STEM [science, technology, engineering, mathematics] approaches generates materialism, which values objects over people. Just count the number of zombies glued to mobile phones in suburban shopping malls and then ring any mobile number and it will invariably divert to a message bank. It has destroyed personal communication and generated an exponential increase in inertia. Decision making is not like approaching an and/or gate in an event tree logic diagram, it is predominantly arational and an enigmatic process involving one brain and three minds although scientists and engineers relentlessly attempt to square the circle and turn our 3.14159 subjective recurring minds into one objective brain. Otiose attempts at measuring noble ethereal traits such as love, compassion and trust merely devalues the attribute. Indeed what gets measured does not get managed it usually gets manipulated and the inherently subjective nature of risk is disregarded, which erodes common law rights. Despite recent advances in neuroscience it would take an extremely brave scientist or engineer to publicly renounce and dismiss the works and influence of Shakespeare, Montaigne, Swift, HG Wells, Guy de Maupassant or William Hazlitt. "The brain does not issue commands, it hosts conversations" - Guy Claxton ('Intelligence in the Flesh') PS, The road to Damascus via Ayn Rand and The Fountainhead did not get past the first page. Maybe I should become an acolyte of Jeffrey Archer.
1 reply
I am on the road to Damascus and off to bed with a battered copy of The Fountainhead.
1 reply
"He who opens a school door closes a prison" - Victor Hugo
1 reply
"A healthy loyalty is not passive and complacent but active and critical" - Harold Laski Laski was an early Fabian along with George Bernard Shaw although he was often excoriated by George Orwell.
1 reply
Well done Shila, keep up the great work "Freedom is always and exclusively freedom for the one who thinks differently" - Rosa Luxemburg
1 reply
Well done Joseph: "Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes." - Carl Jung
1 reply
Bertrand and Dora Russell described the nature of education as follows: "What is considered in education is hardly ever the boy or the girl, the young man or the young woman, but almost always in some form, the maintenance of the existing order. "When the individual is considered, it is almost exclusively with a view to worldly success – making money or achieving a good position. "To be ordinary and to acquire the art of getting on, is the ideal which is set before the youthful mind, except by the few rare teachers who have enough energy of belief to break through the system within which they are expected to work. "Almost all education has a political motive: it aims at strengthening some group, national or religious, or even social, in the competitions with other groups. "It is this motive in the main which determines the subjects taught, the knowledge offered, and the knowledge withheld, and also decides what mental habits the pupils are expected to acquire." What Russell defined in 1934 we now know as ‘cultural reproduction’, which is the process and content that serve to legitimate both the institutions that recreate it and our own actions within them. Much of this is reflected by Paul Freire in 'Pedagogy of the Oppressed' and Ivan Illich in 'Deschooling Society' and many other free schoolers.
1 reply
The third way with its existential dialectic and metanoia has also produced some spectacular failures, namely Tony Blair with his princes of the dark arts, Alastair Campbell and Peter Mandelson. It merely degenerated into a regime of Orwellian doublespeak. In Australia, who can ever forget the narcissistic Kevin Rudd with his programmatic specificity. I am sure Nicola Roxon and Peter Garrett wont be sending him any Christmas cards. One of the best recent parliamentary performances has come from Mark Latham in his maiden address to the NSW Wales legislative council: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nz-Nzs92X5s The work of Guy Claxton especially his books The Wayward Mind and Hare Brain Tortoise Mind are a fascinating read: https://www.guyclaxton.net/ He has also collaborated with Fritjof Capra and James Lovelock.: https://www.schumachercollege.org.uk/
1 reply
The most impressive feature of PNG Attitude is the critical thinking and discernment behind the majority of the posts. It is a refreshing alternative to the binary dialogue of bar parlour bores on platforms such as Facebook or Twitter, where the unnecessary use of exclamation marks is like eating in the street or laughing at your own jokes. Keep up the great work Keith Jackson and Friends, it is much appreciated or should I say cool, awesome, excellent!!!!!! _________ Exclamation marks permitted for demonstration purposes only - KJ
1 reply