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normgd557
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I know that tables are allowed to run on to two or more pages. What about multi-page figures? I am working with a flow chart that contains visual images and to get the whole thing at a scale where the images are readily viewed, (especially with the figure label and caption) requires running on toa second page. Is that legal? If so, does one include the caption on both pages or is there some other way of making sure that it is seen as one and only figure?
Toggle Commented Aug 13, 2019 on Table Tips at APA Style 6th Edition Blog
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This is a question about formatting directly after third or fourth level headings. As I understand it, the rule is to have a period after the heading and then start the first sentence of text directly afterwards (no line break). A couple of questions: If the text immediately after the 3rd or 4th level heading is a block quote or a bulleted list, is that ok, or must one insert some kind of ordinary sentence so that the 3rd or 4th level heading isn't just hanging in space? Second, is it ok or not after a 3rd level heading to go directly to a subordinate 4th level heading, or, again, should some kind of text be inserted before going to the 4th level?
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I am looking at your response to Jepthomas re the possessive with et al. It appears that you are advising that if one wants to stay with apostrophe s possessive you drop the et al. altogether* and just use the possessive with the lead author. Is that so? Does this mean that "et al.'s" is incorrect or unacceptable? * Your answer says: Hi, Jeff. Great question. You can certainly rephrase as "the research conducted by Smith et al. (1999)..." Or, if you want to keep the first version, you write that as "Smith's (1999) research on..."
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If one uses a colon to introduce a quotation, do you need a phrase like "thus" or "as follows". In other words would the following be incorrect? Koval, vanDellen, Fitzsimons, and Ranby (2015) stated: “Although many factors likely predict who is asked to do what (e.g., collegiality; cooking skills), the current research suggests that one robust predictor of being relied on is being high in self-control” (p. 763).
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If the original material quoted is a bullet list, should that list be all single spaced? So would it be (suitably indented): • Thinking back to your Narrative Medicine seminar, what stood out for you? • Looking back on your seminar, what do you think it the purpose was? • Does it fit into the rest of your medical education? • What can you apply to your clinical experience, if anything? (Miller et al., pp. 337–338) Or • Thinking back to your Narrative Medicine seminar, what stood out for you? • Looking back on your seminar, what do you think it the purpose was? • Does it fit into the rest of your medical education? • What can you apply to your clinical experience, if anything? (Miller et al., pp. 337–338)
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A question about in-text provision of initials: do the initials have to be given every time the author is cited, even in the same paragraph? So for example, for an author named R. Bailey (in a paper where there is also a K. Bailey) is the following necessary? "In a series of group experiemnts, R. Bailey (2003), found that the larger group, the weaker the cohesion about goals. He used a sample of undergraduate science students. R. Bailey argued that this finding is robust and arose no matter the gender or ethnic mix of the sample. Several earlier studies (Jackson, 2000; Perkins, 1999) had found gender differences but R. Bailey explainedd these as arising from differences in the experiemnt structure." Or would just "Bailey" do in the subsequent usages, since the context makes it clear which Bailey is being referred to?
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This sure seems to have been a stimulating blog, in terms of the number of questons and comments! Given that a lot of the above was posted almost a decade ago, I just wanted to ask whether APA has got an updated view on the question of chapter titles as (or as not) first level headings? I do appreciate that APA defers to each university on formatting of dissertations, but, aside from that (and recognizing that some longer non-dissertation documents. for example, book manuscripts, have separate chapters) what is the latest rule—or is there one? One other clarification question. If one does follow the idea that Chapter titles are not 1st level headings, then is it still best practice to not use boldface, centered, title case? And if not, then what instead? (not sure why my message is bold italic ;-)
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If you want to have a quote of 40 or more words flow on by using "that" (as Sara suggested), does the first word of the quote get capitalized?
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And a further quesry on the subject of capitalizing racial and ethic terms. What about "people of color"? Ought it to be capitalized?
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I am wondering whether the page number of a quote that is split up a lot, should appear multiple times or not. Here is what I mean, a passage from an essay: Jordan and Jones (2015) suggested that "all sociological analysis of racism" (p. 118) should be understood by researchers as "manifestations of fear" (p. 118) even when overt acts of "aggressive rather than flight behaviour are manifest" (p. 118) Do we neeed all those repeating page numbers or is it preferable for the essay writer to put her own connecting words in brackets? Jordan and Jones (2015) suggested that "all sociological analysis of racism [should be understood by researchers as] manifestations of fear [even when overt acts of] "aggressive rather than flight behaviour are manifest" (p. 118).
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If one uses the term "whiteness" as is ever more common now in many social science writings, should it, by implication from the Manual's rules on capitalizing White and Black, also be capitalized?
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The prohibition on using titles, degres etc. is clear when it comes to in text citations. What about if the writer is referring to the person in another context, not citing but something like this— "The author contacted Dr. Jones earlier in the study to discuss her theory of group failure." Or, must the sentence read, "The author contacted Jones earlier in the study to discuss her theory of group failure." ?
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This is one of many "Grammar 101" gems that I have relied on thanks to this blog. Is tehre a particualr grammar guide that APA commends (just as it has a recommended - Merriam WEbster Collegitae, 2005 - as stated on p. 79 of the Sixth edition)? I know you folks have a lot of greaat and clear advice on this blog and that the 6th edition itself has a fair bit of guidnace. But is there a favoured one for APA adherents? I found "Eats, Shoots, and Leaves" entertaining as well as Morris's "Between You and Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen." There's also a new one by the copy editor from Random House,("Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style") though one soon gets into divergences between his ideas and APA style requirements. Thoughts?
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When quoting an interview (or, for that matter, a "purple passage" from a book, poem etc.) does APA have any guidance or rules about including an "as is" curse word? I've seen writings where either just the first letter and a long dash is used or where characters such as *&# etc., are used instead. Thoughts?
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I am quoting lines from a federal government report's summary. The main body of the report does have page numbering but there is none on the Summary (which is two pages long). Should I use "np" after the quotation or something like "...when Congress codified compensation levels for individuals appointed to certain diplomatic and consular positions."(Gill, 2018, Summary, para. 4)? If you want to have a look at the report it's at https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R45203.pdf
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This is a very specific question. Sage (or is it SAGE?) Publishing uses all Upper Case ltters for its name, apparently because the name was derived from the first two letters of each of the founders' given names: Sara and George McCune. So when one cites a book published by this company should it follow their convention or just use the more ordinary first letter-only capitalized format? That is, Kim, J. H. (2016). Understanding narrative inquiry: The crafting and analysis of stories as research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Or? Kim, J. H. (2016). Understanding narrative inquiry: The crafting and analysis of stories as research. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
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I am curious about citing an online dictionary in one's reference list, and am a bit confused having looked at example 30 in APA 6th edition, p. 205. This is a cite for the word "heuristic" based on a definition in Merriam Webster. What I'm confused about is that it uses "In Merriam-Webster's online dictionary" implying that the title of the work are those last four words (which are italicized). Yet when one follows the given URL (http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/heuristic) the site that comes up does not have that string of four words anywhere I can see. It merely has "Merriam-Webster" (no 's or "online dictionary"), which is the logo. I have run into the same with "Oxford English Dictionary" which I have seen used in a similar citation but when I followed the URL, the only thing that looked like a title was the phrase "English Oxford Living Dictionaries. (The URL I clicked on from a reference list someone sent me was: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ethics) Any clarification you can give on this would be appreciated.
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I know that if one has a quote, block or not, that happens to span across two pages, then a format like pp. 14–15, is used. But what if one uses a quote with an ellipsis and the parts of the quote are more widely separated?That is, you might use some of the source wording from page 14, and then use an ellpsis to traverse to words on page 16 for the end of the quote. Would the page numbers be given as pp. 14–16, or pp. 14, 16 ? Or?
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When citing a chapter of a book that has eight editors, is the ellipis approach used or are all editors to be listed. Here's the challenging reference: Mack, H. (2013). Who owns the OD effort? In J. Vogelsang, M. Townsend, M. Minahan, D. Jamieson, J. Vogel, A. Viets, C. Royal, & L. Valek (Eds.), Handbook for strategic HR: Best practices in organization development from the OD network (pp. 82–86). New York, NY: Amacom. OR Mack, H. (2013). Who owns the OD effort? In J. Vogelsang, M. Townsend, M. Minahan, D. Jamieson, J. Vogel, A. Viets, . . . & L. Valek (Eds.), Handbook for strategic HR: Best practices in organization development from the OD network (pp. 82–86). New York, NY: Amacom.
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I am editing a paper tht frequently refers to a journal called Ecology and Society. It is only published online. At the opening of each article a formatted reference is suggested as "the established format" though I have no idea who and with what style it is established. For example, for one online article they give the following: Brand, F. S., and K. Jax. 2007. Focusing the meaning(s) of resilience: resilience as a descriptive concept and a boundary object. Ecology and Society 12(1): 23. [online] URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol12/iss1/art23/ (The journal name is italicized but I'm not very good at using the HTML tags here ;-) The numeral 23 appears to be an article number My attempt to convert this to APA (or APA-like) is Brand, F. S., & Jax, K. (2007). Focusing the meaning(s) of resilience: Resilience as a descriptive concept and a boundary object. Ecology and Society, 12(1). Retrieved from http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol12/iss1/art23/ (again, I'd italicizie Ecology and Society and the numeral 12). What do you think? ____ Supplementary question: Is it required/preferred/or not to convert the "and" in a journal's title to an ampersand?
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If an online article with a retrieval source also has a doi, would you recommend includig both? The example that has brought this question up for me is the folloiwng which is available only online (and is not paginated) Walker, B., Holling, C. S., Carpenter, S., & Kinzig, A. (2004). Resilience, adaptability, and transformability in social ecological systems. Ecology & Society, 9(2). https://doi.org/10.5751/ES-00650-090205 It is retrieved from https://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol9/iss2/art5/inline.html
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I am guessing that this issue may not be one that APA really has a rule for, but here goes. There are a number of authors who very intentionally choose to have their names written without capitals. One is feminist and social activist, bell hooks. Another is the director of the Haas Institute at Berkeley, jon a. powell. Their wishes are usually adhered to when they are referenced or written about within sentences, but what do you think should be done when their names begin a sentence or in a reference list? The former can (sometimes awkwardly) be avoided by word choice, but seems there's no getting out of the latter dilemma. Is it: Hooks, b.(2003). Teaching community: a pedagogy of hope. New York, NY: Routledge or hooks, b.(2003). Teaching community: a pedagogy of hope. New York, NY: Routledge Thoughts?
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In section 6.18 of the AOA 6th ediution (p. 178) guidance is given for in-text citation of a translated classic as (Aristotle, trans. 1931). I was wondering: if you have the author (Aristotle) outside parentheses is the in text cite now, Aristotle (trans. 1931) ? And would you use it on all isntances of such a cite in your work or only once?
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I'm paraphrasing a long section from a paper that deals with four themes the author has named and described. It would be confusing (I've already tried) to break up the discussion with actual verbatim quotes and would also require dealing with the author writing in the present, while, for consistency with the rest of my review, I'm in the past tense. So I have paraphrased the discussion down from about 5 pages to 4 bulleted paragraphs and my question is whether I should put the cite at the beginning as a lead in, or at the end of the bullets, or at the end, more as one would with a 40+ word block quote The former would look something like this, as I have conceived it: Sybil and Moore (1988) have discussed their model in terms of four main themes (pp. 121–126): Referencing at the end would just be to have this on the same line as the last bullet ends: (Sybil & Moore, 1988, pp. 121–126) or should it be: (paraphrased from Sybil & Moore, 1988, pp. 121–126) ?
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Just to clarify, the common 250 word limit relates to a journal article? For a much longer work such as a 200 page dissertation or thesis, would APA still recommend 250 max?
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