This is Nirit Simon's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Nirit Simon's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Nirit Simon
Recent Activity
Kaden, your storytelling is SOOOO good. I hope you start performing publicly.
1 reply
PS I have started using post it notes to play around with the ordering of the parts of my stories. I got this idea from you and Liz.
1 reply
P.S. I did use post it notes just to put the parts in the right order.
1 reply
Your blog post inspired me to try crafting a story without writing anything down. I did my third story this way, and it went just fine. Thanks for the idea!
1 reply
I agree that you were brave to start out with such a complex story, and I can see why you felt post-it notes were necessary. It was a lot to keep track of. But you did great! I never even noticed you looking at the notes. I think they were more like a Dumbo's feather for you. I felt tuned in and captivated by your story and look forward to the next one.
1 reply
Love the Rob Lowe poster! I started a new job on October 2nd. So that day I too felt a mixture of emotions, sadness regarding the tragedy, and also excitement about starting something new.
1 reply
I like the part where you mentioned rolling certain characters into one. I just learned about that technique in my reading. I also like the part where you say that you wanted to make sure that you collaborate with the audience to make a satisfying experience. Storytelling is collaborative, isn't it?
1 reply
What a beautiful story! Thank you so much for sharing it and the lovely pictures of your family.
1 reply
I tend to think of childbirth in more clinical terms. And I tend to think of babies as small versions of the adults they will one day become. Yet every time I listen to someone tell about their witnessing of a birth, I feel very moved and can't help but tear up. Weird. Maybe there is something primal going on here.
1 reply
So funny! It would be interesting to listen to one of the stories and figure out specifically what one should NOT do in storytelling.
1 reply
Elizabeth, your post reads like a beautiful poem. Thank you for encouraging us to share our stories. When you mentioned that we lose a part of ourselves when those close to us depart without having shared their stories, that struck a chord. By sharing our stories, we might inspire, encourage, or permit the people closest to us to tell theirs.
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2016 on Time by Elizabeth Wunsch at Tell Me Something Good
1 reply
I really appreciate what you said about how "there is no deceit or lies in autism." I work with some young adults who are on the autism spectrum, and I find that spending time with them is often my favorite part of the day. I, too, appreciate their guilelessness. It is very refreshing. Perhaps this way of interacting without subterfuge is one of the gifts that autism brings to our world. Thank you for sharing about this.
1 reply
Great essay! This course in storytelling has really helped me to focus on imagery and to include concrete and tangible examples in my stories. My tendency is to focus on ideas and feelings. Now I am learning how powerful it is to appeal to the five senses. By the way, I had no idea that Little Red Riding Hood's red cape is a symbol of burgeoning sexuality! All this time, I thought it was a cautionary tale urging girls to stay away from wolves. (oh, wow!)
1 reply
Nice post, Sally! I like the way you broke this topic down into specific areas and then discussed each one of them in the context of your story. This helps me consider trust, permission, and ownership more carefully for my next story. Thanks!
1 reply
Nirit Simon is now following The Typepad Team
Oct 30, 2016