This is K Sheffield's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following K Sheffield's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
K Sheffield
NYAZ
Recent Activity
I'd never heard of Jelly Belly Bean Boozled, but it sounds a lot like Bertie Bott's Every Flavour Beans from Harry Potter. And I get your point, if I don't always follow it. But thanks for a cool way to remember to step outside the box!
1 reply
What a great gift you gave your daughters, Kathy! And what a great gift for us that you shared this!
1 reply
Lorraine, your story of your experiences get to the very heart of what it means to live and make your life into art. I'm not only speaking of Liz Warren and Michael Lacapa, but of you. Just think how many people you've affected! The memories and stories from our childhood are the deepest.
1 reply
I so agree with you, Stephanie! That wonderful supportive atmosphere in classes is something I've rarely experiences elsewhere, and keeps me coming back. I'm also inspired by the talent, courage, and trust I find in my classmates and their stories. Truly terrific!
1 reply
This is so true, and so well put! The real "crucible" is finding the universal in any story, whether an "I shot the sheriff" kind (I love that line!) or the "I shot a picture of my breakfast to post on Facebook" kind. Once we've found that we've linked ourselves, our story and our audience into something truly and uniquely human. Thanks for reminding us of something so important.
1 reply
I so relate to your opening dilemma, Marian! I always feel that some personal story I'm working on is either "too normal" to be interesting or "too weird" to be shared. But you're so right that the warmth and acceptance of the storytelling community gives us the courage to tell both kinds of stories! Thanks for sharing this!
1 reply
As a linguist, I get really curious about the origins of words, even "nonsense" words. We know that "Fie!" was used by Shakespeare to mean "Bad!" and "Fee" has a current meaning of a cost, but what's with the "Fo, Fum"? I never heard of a "Fo," but "Fum" appears in a Spanish carol from about the time of Shakespeare. Or it could just be, as you say, a bunch of fun-to-say syllables. Anyway, thanks for sharing the story and information with us!
1 reply
This is an issue that greatly puzzles me, and has split the Women's Movement:how do we define women and women's power? One way is to say that silence is weakness and voice is strength. But isn't that measuring women by patriarchal standards? Or we could say that silence is strength, either for everyone or just for women. But doesn't that cede the floor to the patriarchical norm? In any case, your article reminds me of my Aunt Louise: mostly silent as she listened to us all, but when she died we felt the strong power she'd wielded in centering our family. Real power, that. Thanks for reminding me.
1 reply
I think it’s great that you’re experimenting with different ways of crafting your stories. In teaching I learned that some of s learn best through seeing, some through hearing, and some through movement and touching. You mentioned storyboarding and outlining, both visual. I wonder how we can use hearing and movement and touching to help us remember our tales.
1 reply
In the comment above, I typed Von Trapp family, but Autocorrect thought it knew better what I meant. Proof positive that digital machines still can’t capture all we humans can communicate😁!
1 reply
Your family sounds like the literary equivalent of the Avon Trapp family! What a great book, play or movie this would make! Your account gives me an understanding of where your own wit, humor and perceptive insight come from. I wish there were so many more warm and expressive progressive intellectuals like your mother!
1 reply
Thank you for raising the topic of the differences between oral storytelling and written stories. I think structural differences are central. It’s not necessarily that all oral stories have simpler structures than any written story, I think, but that different structures and techniques are required to help both teller and listener follow clearly. I’m amazed at the creativity so many in our class show in finding new and clever structures, including your method of turning written story into a told one!
1 reply
Oh, Diana, what a rich, warm experience you have given to the world with your story! It is so full of courage and love in the face of the sorrow and disappointment life can hand us all. This shows how powerful and healing a sincere story truly is!
1 reply
Thank you, Nirit, for sharing your process in such careful detail. I had never thought of finding a theme as a simple truth. It really helps me with a Parton crafting my stories that I usually find difficult.
1 reply
K Sheffield is now following The Typepad Team
Nov 30, 2017