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nw10jb
London, UK
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my last post omitted the word NOT, in it's last sentence. This should have read: ...dozens of these words before and aimed for a little more uniformity, which evidently, he was in reality NOT able to to.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
Regarding English spelling. You may or may not be aware that English is a comparatively new written language. In Shakespeare's day English, in written form, did not exist. This is demonstrated in all of his plays and other written material. Shakespeare wrote words how he assumed they should have been spelt if a dictionary had been created for the English written word, which one had not. In fact, in many of his essays Shakespeare constantly spelt words completely differently to the way he had spelt them before. I suppose if he had been less of a genius and had produced fewer prose, he might have been able to remember the way he had spelt dozens of these words before and aimed for a little more uniformity, which evidently, he was in reality able to do.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
my last paragraph should read: on the other hand, you might watch a battle in a Theatre. This would mean that you would be watching a re-enactment of a battle by actors on a stage located inside a building constructed solely for the purpose of entertaining people.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
Generally speaking "er" is used in a verb (an action), while "re" is used in a nown (a tangible object). For example: you may have heard military people refer to the actions carried out on a battlefield as the theater of war. We don't expect this to mean that a battle was fought in a building. In this context: theater refers to all the individual sctions as a whole, that occurred during that battle and not just one single action. On the other hand, you might watch a battle in a Theatre. This would mean that you would be watching a re-enactment of a battle.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
I am dyslectic. I write things omitting words which can change their intended meaning and do not notice these omissions when proof reading what I have written before I publish these posts. In my last post I should have said that no UK dictionary has "by appointment to Her Majesty the Queen" printed in them, other than the Oxford dictionary.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
It was naughty of me. I read the first comment, which said that there is no difference between Centre and center (which there really is) and without reading any other posts, wrote mine. I've since read all the others and I'm pleased to discover that the general consensus is that while center is the middle of something, Centre is a building or gathering place. To be clear, in the UK there is only one authorised dictionary. This is the Oxford dictionary. There are many other dictionaries in the UK but none have "by appointment to Her Majesty the Queen" printed in them.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
I've just noted the time in which this site says I am posting these comments. I do not want anyone to think that I am an insomniac or a person that stays up until the early hours each night. I live in London, UK and the time in London, now is 09:57 GMT.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
I've just thought of a better example. My local Harlesden Community Centre hasn't even been erected in Harlesden. This building is in the neighbouring London district of Willesden.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
I'm sorry to be out of step with everyone else but I was taught at School that while Center is the Central or centric part of a building or place, Centre is a construction which does not have to be in the centric position of that building or place. For example: The Center of my local Park is in the middle but the Park's Centre (the building in which People gather in that Park) is located at it's North West Corner.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2014 on Center or Centre? at Ask the English Teacher
1 reply
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Oct 26, 2014