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Sue McCormick
Columbia Mo
Retired
Interests: Genealogy, Counted Embroideries, Reading
Recent Activity
That should have been "18 year old self" I'm not sure how the 80 got in. (I'm now 88+, but I don't look back fondly to 8 years ago — 70 years ago is quite another matter!
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2016 on Another View of Vegas at Word Wenches
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As I have mentioned before, the RT conventions have become W-A-A-Y too large for my comfort. Oh, to regain the energy of my 80-year-old self and to have joined you! My granddaughter and her then Air Force husband were stationed at Nellis for awhile. We hoped to join them there and visit Vegas, but the chance eluded us. So my closest visits will probably remain the posts she sent us from their journeys to town. He's now retired and working in the Yorktown, Virginia area. I HAVE been to Yorktown and we may achieve a visit to theme while they are there. Yorktown is much more my style, anyway. Vegas has history, but it's buried in all that glamor. Yorktown shares its history.
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2016 on Another View of Vegas at Word Wenches
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I drink tea, but nowadays I drink an odd combination of very very weak tea combined with a fizzy soda-water (either Diet Fresca or a brand called LaCroix, which is really fizzy water with flavor but no sweetener This is served cold). I like this, and the flavor varies daily. I created this form of drink because it meets some health issues for me. It certainly wouldn't fit into any proper tea service of Regency or Victorian times! (And I have always preferred weak tea — just a personal trait.) As to tea sets. I own an incomplete Victorian service which was my Grandmother's. We don't use it because it is truly an heirloom, complete with family story about how my grandmother saved the set from a house fire. We display it as a proud possession. The pattern is an old U. S. pattern called flow ware and the sugar bowl and milk pitcher are nearly as large as the teapot!. The cups have no handles.
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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So many first lines to pick from. My offering, "The bus had no business stopping where it did. We should have got straight on across the Coldingham Moor, with Dunbar to the back of us and the English border drawing ever nearer, but instead we stopped, and the shaggy-faced cattle thet lifted their heads on the far side of the fence appeared to share my surprise when the driver put the engine to an idle." "The Shadowy Horses" by Susan Kearsley.
Toggle Commented Apr 19, 2016 on Opening Lines at Word Wenches
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I am envious, and I wish I had been there BUT the size of this convention is too large for me! I continue to attend the Science Fiction convention that is the heir to the 1968 convention where Bob and I met; some years that convention is too large for me. There is a genealogy convention in Salt Lake City, early in the year that I also yearn for, but will never attend. (I thought of it because a well-known (internet) genealogist from Sydney attends RootsTech every year. I think you are both very intrepid to fly all those miles to get overrun by all those people in those differing fields). I KNOW it would be impossible, but I'm still yearning for a nice cozy meeting between ALL of the WW plus your devoted readers. (The hotel could be cozy, but the airlines would wonder why they had so many international travelers!)
Toggle Commented Apr 19, 2016 on A Wench Abroad at Word Wenches
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Thank you for this visit to the Old Bailey. The list of things to see if we are ever able to return to London keeps growing by leaps and bounds! As well as all the things to see outside that great city. We may never get there but we are still planing our next trip. And will continue to do so. (Though I must admit the trip to Niagara Falls, some nearby parts of Canada, and upstate New York comes first on our list. Much closer to Missouri, yet we haven't gotten there yet!)
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I want to feel that the name is "in tune" with the period, but I am well aware that we can be surprised. I am pretty sure that Charlotte Bronte is responsible for Shirley as a feminine first name — I believe that it became popular for women only after her publication of the book by that name. Her heroine was "Shirley" from a family last name. So using family names for women was at least conceivable by the mid nineteenth century. I've never looked up the background on this — it is purely assumption on my part. And, remembering that I referring to a Bronte (all of whom liked to shock), I may be way out of bounds in my assumptions.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2016 on AAW names at Word Wenches
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"I hope I'm turning you on to romantic fantasy though!" — Oh, YES! I have been reading ALL the Malcom novels as they come out. I'm definitely a fan of this families.
Toggle Commented Apr 12, 2016 on Science of the Stars at Word Wenches
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The genre I have followed longest is "Science Fiction." Ever since the magazine "Fantasy and Science Fiction" (or F&SF) has been on the market Fans and Conventions have been openly including Fantasy as a part of that genre. (of course it was always a part, just not so openly acknowledged). Now Fantasy has become even more important to mama F&SF fans. So yes I read lots of it. For a while, after Tolkien first became popular, "high fantasy" was THE form, but many forms of fantasy are now on offer. And Fantasy occurs in more genres nah SF.
Toggle Commented Apr 11, 2016 on Science of the Stars at Word Wenches
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I'm glad to know it's a myth. I have suspected so, but didn't know where and how to look it up.
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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I didn't know that I had any particular feelings for plaids and kilts until our visit to Great Britain in 1997. While we were watching the Changing of the Guard at both St. James and Buckingham Palaces (and shocking a fellow viewer by quoting Christopher Robin at the latter), we noticed that some of the guard at St. James Palace were wearing the Black Watch tartan. Then a few days later we saw the same tartan, among others at Edenborogh Castle. On both occasions I teared up upon seeing the plaid clothes. Apparently ANY sett will do.
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2016 on Happy Tartan Day at Word Wenches
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I don't have wardrobe or chifferobe stories. I believe I saw some but they were in houses of comparative strangers, not in family houses where I could explore.. There were plenty around me though, because I was always familiar with both terms. I don't know if "chifforobe" is southern or not. I heard the term often in St. Louis in the 1930s — but then, as I've remarked before, St. Louis is entirely Southern, entirely Northern, entirely Eastern, and entirely Western. I heard ALL regions, ALL the time. I do have a comment on the relatively more common built-in closet in the U. S. I have read that for many years the various British areas had room taxes — real estate taxes that counted each room in the house. And a built-in closet was a room, but a piece of furniture wasn't. If we ever had room taxes in the U. S they didn't survive the Revolution. So we built the closets as we built our houses. I don't remember my source for this, so it may be lots of hot air. But I do remember it as an explanation for our more prevalent use of builtins.
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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I don't have any favorite April Fool's Day memories. It seems that my parents ignored it, as I did with my children. My son (who is a newspaper reporter at our state capitol city) sometimes posts a mild one on Facebook. I haven't heard about it from either of my daughters. On the other hand, yesterday on Facebook, my fourth cousin on my mother's side posted some fond memories about the tricks her mother pulled on the children as they were growing up. The post ended with a "thank you mom." I found this touching — all the more so since the two branches of the family have only recently (last 5 years) reconnected through genealogy searches made by the mother and by me.
Toggle Commented Apr 2, 2016 on Just Foolin' at Word Wenches
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I also loved Mary Elgin. I remember a fourth book, but have not been able to find the name of it! Do I remember it correctly? Is it the story of the founder of the employment agency that springboards the other three books?
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Nicola mentioned "…books where it doesn’t matter a jot that I know exactly what is going to happen; they still makes me laugh or cry…"; I Immediately thought of "Little Women" (not exactly a lost treasure) because I ALWAYS cry when Beth dies. And I, too, treasure "Precious Bane." My choice for forgotten treasure is "Wingarden" by Elsie Lee (and her other novels also). Yes many are somewhat dated, because they were in modern settings and were very much up to date as they were being written. But I was alive and experiencing those years, so I revisit my past when I revisit her books. Her books are still listed on Amazon to be obtained from third-party sellers.
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I grew up in what was then the 10th largest city, but my paternal grandmother lived in a small rural support town. After ending my professional life on Manhattan and living for seven years in Greater New York City, we retired to a small college town in central Missouri. This was definitely a bid to get away from the big city! But it is now the 5th largest city in the state. I guess the small town and/or the country isn't for me! (We like it here, and 5th largest is still small compared to Greater New York.)
Toggle Commented Mar 28, 2016 on Jo Beverley: Interview! at Word Wenches
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At 88, I no longer garden. My gardening has always been rather utilitarian, so I never really got into landscaping ideas, although I enjoy landscaping when others do it. I DO have a lovely spread of African Violets in my dining room. I put the three small commercial plants into big pots and the spread of the violets is wonderful to see. But they sit in large clay pots with frozen food trays to hold the water as i water them from below, so there is no decorating even for houseplants. I guess I'm esthetically challenged.
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All your reasons, plus I like to solve word puzzles and jigsaw puzzles and I like to create forms and make lists (i.e., use databases).
Toggle Commented Mar 25, 2016 on Why Do We Do Genealogy? at Legacy News
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Mar 25, 2016