This is adloyada's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following adloyada's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
adloyada
I am a recovering couch potato
Interests: Jewish life & learning, language and education, my family history, London, media & media gizmos, debunking radical posturing, getting out more, academic hissy fits, sourcing designer clothes from charity shops
Recent Activity
You are truly wonderful. Thank you so much for this brilliantly easy painfree gizmo that's saved me hours of totally unnecessary rage at what Twiiter was doing, telling me to follow people who were actually the last people I'd want to follow. If there is a points system in Heaven for doing good deeds, you've just hit the jackpot.
One of the most powerful indicators of the grip the Loony Left tendency has in the Labour Party and the Trade Union movement which bankrolls it is the number and signficance of the unions which have signed up to such causes as boycotting Israeli goods, supporting the "resistance" of Gaza, ie Hamas, as well as supporting and funding the Stop the War Campaign. The TUC itself is signed up to a Boycott Israeli goods policy as is Unite, Labour's main funder and the usual union suspects. Almost all those unions are signed up to policies of support and friendship with Chavez and Castro's Cuba, In no case do those unions remotely represent the views of their membership. But they have been captured by hard left activists and in most cases the Trotskyist SWP. All their ballot votes on such matters represent a miniscule proportion of the actual membership The Coalition needs to take the cause of reforming union as well as national voting systems more seriously. Rather than advocating or tolerating systems which will give even more dog-wagging power to tiny tail-end extremist parties, the answer is to legislate for 100% democracy--ie compulsory voting at both national level and in the unions and professional associations. This would ensure that the Greens and the BNP as well as the Loony Left would be consigned to the oblivion they deserve nationally and in the unions.
1 reply
Why assume that UKIP voters would have voted Tory if UKIP had withdrawn? They might just have likely have switched their vote to the BNP.
1 reply
Clegg, wonderfully described on BBCR4 Today Prog this morning as "a vacuum in a suit" is already working this opportunistically for all he's worth. He's sounding off about Cameron's presumption and making sanctimonious calls about "the people not Cameron will decide"-- ignoring his own previous statements about demanding PR as the price for his support in a coaltion and his declared refusal to work with Brown even if Labour were to get more votes than the LibDems.
1 reply
Cameron can benefit from repeatedly harping on Clegg's/the LibDems' proposal for an amnesty for illegal immigrants. When challenged on this in a previous debate, Clegg hammered on about how this was the only realistic proposal and the other parties were incapable of delivering on rounding up and deporting illegal immigrants. Cameron needs to challenge him very firmly on this defeatism--similarly with the LibDems' wish to legalise softer drugs. He needs to pre-empt the response that Boris has also proposed an amnesty for illegal immigrants--because Boris' proposals have been firmly rejected by the Conservative Party. He can quote the example of Baroness Scotland to demonstrate how lax and complacent Labour has also been on illegal immigrants. He also needs to press hard on how Clegg's insistence on a proportional representation system will end up with seats in Parliament for the BNP and other extremist parties, using the PR system foisted on us for the EU Parliament without any national debate or vote has indeed put the BNP on the EU gravy train. Rather than just vaguely outlining how bad a hung parliament would be for Britain, he needs to give much more vivid and telling examples of the unfair "concessions"=payoffs and kickbacks minority parties across the world extract for keeping governments in hung legislatures going. And he needs to nail very firmly that far from being "balanced" such legislatures are distorted in favour of particular sectional interests and ego groups who are in a position to hold the government to ransom. He can include the open statements of Salmond and Plaid Cymru to extract concessions which will be to the disadvantage of the rest of us as a price for keeping a minority/coalition going. Not what the British public would recognise as a fair and effective solution to Britain's problems. LibDems soft on illegal immigration, soft on drugs, keen to foist PR stalemate/payoffs on us-- should be a winning hand.
Toggle Commented Apr 29, 2010 on Cameron's three goals in Birmingham at thetorydiary
1 reply
adloyada is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 15, 2010
Oh Sean, I do think you're being a little unkind to John Bercow. Surely not when he's just been spray-painted and moisturized for the day?
1 reply
Hi Iain You may be right re core Tory activists and enthusiasts. The evidence from polls shows it's not a big deal or even high on the agenda with voters in general. My contribution is about what I think is the incomparably greater risk Cameron places himself in by leaving troughers in place who are then going to be more vulnerable than he seems to think to unforeseen attacks from Man in White Suit/Celebrity with a Conscience or similar independent challenger candidates. Farrage's choice of Bercow to challenge is a master-stroke because it puts him in a position of making an apparently righteous challenge to the whole House of Commons/mainstream parties' continuing complacency and keep-quiet-and-they'll-back-off-and-leave-us-to-carry-on attitude that are signified by the vote into the Speakership of Bercow, and Cameron's continuing support of Duncan on the Expenses Committee and in the face of everything else he cares to pass off on us. Now that really is something most of the electorate is still absolutely livid and disgusted about. They will welcome ways to punish the culprits. So Farrage is going to ride that, and Bercow is suddenly not quite the cat who got the cream he thought he was. It'll be the voters and not his fellow MPs who get to choose. Now Boris is so much cleverer than Cameron at giving the voters messages that show he's aware of how the public feels and taking dramatic action to demonstrate appropriate reform. So he books himself and his team into standard class on the Eurostar and then asks the BBC team who turn up to film him on the train what class they're travelling on. Yes, they're travelling first class. Oh, but it was a very cheap deal. Yeah. 6-0, 6-0, 6-0 to Boris..... Whereas Cameron's stunt on bike (which was being followed by a chauffeur driven car bringing along his paperwork......)
1 reply
Well, Bercow has a very large salary indeed (getting on for double his MP's salaray.and the very finest tied cottage in the country to defend. Plus he says he had been coveting the Speaker job for years. He is absolutely ecstatic in the post. And I think that for him to lose his seat would be the equivalent of being required to saw his own head off. Getting a P45 and a fairly generous pension, but nothing like the one he'd get after sitting in the Speaker's Chair for more than a few months. Cameron might well feel obliged to give him a berth in the House of Lords, but all that doesn't begin to make up for a humiliation, the loss of money he had already mentally banked and the loss of his House of Commons status. I think you'll find he puts up a huge campaign via third parties like the Beeb, the Guardian, the Independent, the special needs/disability organizations, the gay organizations and others who have had very strong support from him. Plus there is no end of sympathetic journalists and broadcasters who will constantly revile and disparage Farage (not difficult, given his persona). And he'll wax long and loud about Farage challenging the democratic foundations of this country--ie the neutral speaker being dragged into political infighting by a man with an extreme (as he will put it agenda). He will claim to speak for the democratic importance of an approach neutral young "reforming" Speaker to young families, the poor, the weak, the decent citizens, the open-minded etc. I can almost predict Jonathan Freedland's Guardian articles now. You saw their campaigns re Bush, Boris and Obama? That's what they're going to pull out for Bercow. The Beeb, C4 will be right behind him. Can I imagine Adam Boulton being remotely sympathetic to Farage? Not sure I can. Also I think the BNP will back Farage. So that'll enable the mainstream establishment press/media to smear Farage as a fellow traveller of the BNP. The photos in the press will constantly present Bercow looking his best and most genial and Farage looking like-well, an elderly Archie Andrews. Even so, unless Farage fouls up and overplays his hand, I think he's got an excellent chance of winning. Remember Michael Portillo?
1 reply
Marcellus, you and I have very different views of the EU and those who either support or oppose UK membership of it and what can be read off about a person's politics from that. I don't want to engage with your use of extreme inflammatory terms like "collaborators' "brainwash" "demean our country" and "insult England and the people who love this country", especially as I'm proud to state my love of this country. So you've seen the Wikipedia explanation, and my view of the language of politics around this issue, and I won't respond any further on this topic.
1 reply
This Wikipedia explanation will do-- it links its origin to its present manifestation
1 reply
Very interesting that the latest post up on CH shows how the media coverage of the Tory Party's first use of primaries to select a candidate was their biggest hit of the month. Chimes with what I've been trying to say in my comments about how the public remains totally disgusted with politicians and really responds to something that empowers themhaving the most important say in choosing their representatives. At the end of the day the party faithful and the followers of committed party blogs and events won't make any significant difference to the results at the next election. You still seem to be brushing aside the concerns of the public in favour of your own priorities, maybe assuming you don't have to work too hard to win anyway.
1 reply
Thanks, Malcolm. I've expanded my take on it on my blog here: http://tinyurl.com/oxyb3k best wishes Judy
1 reply
Thanks, Andrew. I think Cameron has put himself at greater risk than he realizes. Remember the EU elections. If he ends up with a disappointing majority his hands will be tied in relation to what he most needs to do. I wish he'd wake up to the danger and how relatively easily he could seize back the initiative and leave Farage to get rid of a Speaker he'd rather not face the opprobrium of having to unseat. My further take on the Farage story is here: http://tinyurl.com/oxyb3k best wishes Judy
1 reply
I've extended my previous analysis of the likely impact of Farage's move -- and added to what I think the implications are for the other parties, including the Tories. And I've found an amazing completely unexpected link between Farage and a national treasure of the past. Read it all here.
1 reply
Wonder how Bercow will defend presiding over raising MPs' monthly chit-free expenses from £250 to £400 p/m once he got voted in? And how about the fact that helping him do that was the entirely beloved Tory superstar Alan Duncan, he of the garden and now living on slightly larger rations than he was before the two of them, Martin-defender Bell and H.Harman joined him in voting in this change once he became Speaker and just before Parliament went into recess? David Cameron's failure to go for a total sweep of troughers will come back to haunt him on this. He has to choose between either standing a Tory to help Bercow and keep UKIP out or standing down and helping UKIP win. Either way, the appalling Farage, who I hate with a passion (as I do his party and its Little England politics) has for once shown political brilliance, seized the initiative and hopelessly wrong-footed the other political parties on this. Labour's also hoist with its own petard in having ensured he got voted in over Tory opposition I think everyone here (as does Cameron) seriously underestimates the way the public feels and will go on feeling as long as the main political parties try to draw a line under the expenses scandal. All Farage has to do is just keep publicising the huge hike from £250-£400 per month free of chits to win the fight. He's unanswerable on that one and I would love to see Bercow keep having to try and defend it, especially as he'll have to either defend himself as the apolitical rep of the whole Parliament (main evidence the monthly expenses hike) or he'll have to present himself as Mr Nice Guy opposed to nasty old political meddler. He comes over slightly better than Alan Duncan in the Mr Nice Guy role but not that much--another man deeply in love with himself and who has the greatest difficulty in projecting neutrality. Expect lots of use of his disabled child and pictures of him taking kids round Parliament. Will that be enough to overcome the "Hiked expenses free rides up from £250 to £400. Which way would you vote? And, by the way, who will be bankrolling and paying for Mr Bercow's election expenses and publicity? That's a nice one. Cameron can still outflank Farage by leaving Bercow to his fate and announcing a much more radical approach to his own troughers and troughers in general: primaries for all candidates before local constituencies are allowed to select promises to bring in a "vote the rascal out" system which can lead to recall and fresh election at national and local level promise to rescind the free-monthly trough hand out and put it back to £250 with chits required. Introduction of 100% democracy-- all voters have to vote but have the freedom to write in candidates AND vote for "none of the above" Combine that plus "vote the rascal out" and the voters will feel at last that they can do something about parties and troughers who depend for their power base on otherwise impregnable seats. Plus it will give much more legitimacy for whoever gets elected. And it will send the most powerful of messages to those MPs who feel they're both safe for life and entitled. You know, like Alan Duncan and John Bercow. Nothing less is going to impress the voters.
1 reply
I love the attitude of Steve T and others above. Why on earth should we take any notice of public outcries and people complaining in their tiresome way about Duncan's expenses, when here we have this splendid libertarian? Oh, don't suppose it's occurred to you that those dim crying-out types so unappreciative of Mr Duncan's libertarianism (which seems to me to amount to Freebies for Me and My Friends) actually get to cast votes? You know, in this election thingie that's coming up next year? So you think that what people really want is libertarians and characters like Alan Duncan? That they'll leave their houses to go and cast their vote for him and the Tory party which offers him as one of its front line politicians? That it's the party that's selected him as Leader of the House? That'll have them flocking into the voting booths. The days when people would vote for a pig with the right coloured rosette stuck on it are long gone. Ask your party agents. I'm not particularly impressed by Harriet Harman, but I have to say I take her seriously in a way that I can't with Duncan. I don't like her equality legislation, and I hope her husband doesn't get elected. But I do still think she's committed to working for her constituents and her party rather than herself. And she did manage to come across as rather more understanding of how the public feels about expenses than Duncan. She's got the capacity of speaking as if she means it on topics other than self love. Actually, rather few of the Tories have a strong public image. Most people know who Cameron and Osborne are. I think the next best known after that is Hague. And Clarke, all retreads from an awrful long ago. Then the next one that comes to mind is Duncan. There's the woman with the kitten heels. Can't even remember the name of the NHS spokesman. Doesn't look at all impressive. Because so few of them are really in the public's mind, Duncan's high profile is even more damaging to the Tories. Or are the focus groups telling you different? I thought Hannan brilliant on the NHS. But he's gone and contaminated the brand and put serious NHS change back by feeling the need to embrace Enoch Powell. Even if not on race issues. Yep, that'll keep getting trotted out too, like Boris' Eton/Bullingdon background. But without the Boris charm and obvious rapport with the public to help. The Guardian & Co thoght all they had to do was keep repeating "Tory buffoon" "Eton Buffoon" "Bullingdon Club Buffoon" . But the public are not fools and they could see what Boris had to offer as an alternative to Dread Red Ken. Alan Duncan? Now there is a first class, but very self-serving venal buffoon. Every time I see someone else defend him on this thread, I think, gosh, are the Tories really this out of touch with the rest of the electorate? It's like watching a Labour list where people try to defend Gordon Brown because his wife does a good act. Up to you, folks. Had Cameron got really tough and stayed tough on expenses, he'd have had fantastic ratings. Doesn't seem to have learned from the EU elections. Maybe he's just not that ambitious.
1 reply
So there were at some point 31% of Tories who actually approved of Duncan? And you think that might be some indicator of how he might stand with the country at large? He's worthwhile because he can carry off an appearance on HIGNFY? Hallo? Heard of Charles Kennedy former Liberal party leader? He could do HIGNFY a damned deal better than Duncan? Is it cos he is gay? No! Were Iain Dale to stand as an MP, I'm sure he'd be popular with the public in a way that Duncan never will be. Why? Because he's wry and good humoured, and not a smug, posturing git primarily interested in himself--which is how Duncan comes across to me. Get this Mr Cameron and friends: Mr Duncan and your handling of him will cost you a good chunk of the huge majority you really need if you want to make the changes the country needs. The attitude taken by Cameron to Duncan's last scandal put a great many of the public right back into the "none of the above" category. And we know where that got us at the last Euro election. Please wake up, Mr Cameron and friends. It's not too late. But you have to show you really are cutting the whole tribe of troughers loose. Duncan head of the queue. And you're going to start by putting onto that committee Mr Hollibone who has the lowest expenses of any MP. The public will certainly get the message. Graham Norton with all his camping about etc is a great deal more popular with the public, and were he an MP, he would still be loved however over the top he was. The difference between Duncan and Norton is that Norton is never arrogant, always talks to and with and not down to his audience. His audiences feel he's on their side, is sympathetic and is warm and understanding. He never projects smugness like Duncan always does. I can't imagine Dale or Norton making the sort of statements about being on rations and needing to jack up MPs' salaries like Duncan did. And as for claiming it was a joke? It was so obviously what he really thinks. The real issue with Duncan is his absolutely insufferable self-regard, self-importance and arrogance, and the way he so obviously thinks himself above us little people, entitled to what he gets and a great deal more too. He is absolutely incapable of projecting humility of any sort. It sounds grotesquely unconvincing when he tries. I can't think why he's on the Tory front bench. He looks like a smooth life insurance salesman/confidence trickster. Even before the scandal I wouldn't have bought a life insurance policy off him. I'm normally a Labour voter, but I voted for Boris (who I saw talking to the schoolgirls in the class I was with) because despite his faults, he is great at relating to people, he does actually listen with humility and he's obviously not just on the make. Of course my main reason for voting for Boris was my passionate desire to get rid of Livingstone, but had Duncan been the candidate, I would never have voted Tory. Now let's look at Duncan's role. His expenses track record is appalling and he's really come across as unrepentant, aggrieved and much more concerned for himself and his fellow troughers. But the worst of this is that he (along with Stuart Bell, Martin and Harman) were the people who sat on the Parliamentary Committee that presided over the expenses scam regime, year in year out. He signed off along with the others the ever increasing rip-offs. Why was he there in that role? And Cameron has left him there, when he should have either withdrawn the whip or at least forced him to resign from the committee and stand himself up to a constituency primary and selection process. I would have admired and cheered for Cameron if he'd done that. Instead, Duncan's still there. And he and the others got together and agreed--after all the scandal, and just before Parliament went into recess--that MPs could now get £400 expenses a month without receipts instead of £250. What an outrage! I presume Cameron must have agreed to it. The public will not forget. Cameron may be confident enough to think he can best help himself by drawing a line under the expenses scandal. But the public does not forget. I wish Martin Bell would stand against him. The public doesn't just want to take down the troughers. They want very much to take down the trough catering managers and contractors.
1 reply
I've enjoyed playing with ritual utterances around the way the NHS is habitually discussed by both Laour and Tories here. If one applies the way the provision in the NHS is usually talked about to a slightly different context, the effect can be delightful.
Toggle Commented Aug 25, 2009 on Right wing words at CentreRight
1 reply
Douglas Carswell, for his extraordinary courage and dignified persistence. Cameron, Brown et al would never have got rid of Martin and set the whole pack of crooked cards falling if it were not for him.
1 reply
Maybe the polls reflect the public disillusionment with David Cameron after days and days of him failing to take action on Julie Kirkbride and other expenses miscreants in the Tory party, like Maude and Duncan. After all, Tory ratings shot up after he came on tough about making his MPs write out cheques and making some backwoodsmen stand down. So why shouldn't they fall after he seemed to have been selective in his anger, just like Brown? If Cameron came out tomorrow and committed to a root and branch cleaning out of the Fees office and all the offenders of every party, and pledged to give Tory parliamentary time to it, I've no doubt Tory ratings would soar again All his talk about reforming the constitution just looks like diversion and playing to the gallery.
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2009 on Rogue poll? at thetorydiary
1 reply
You may think it entirely appropriate that any MP funds himself a second home in his constituency by having taxpayers pay the interest on a £300,000 mortgage. I think most voters will strongly disagree. There are many MPs with families who provide themselves with very much less costly constituency home arrangements. The fact that he paid off his £75,000 London mortgage within months of taking this one looks very much as if he in fact transferred a non-subsidisable mortgage into a larger one in order that it would be subsidised by taxpayers. And his selective action on MP expenses miscreants, particularly taking no real action those close to him, such as Wiggins, Maude and Duncan looks indefensible. Why is Wiggins any different from Morley? Simply saying that Duncan won't sit in Cabinet is hardly what I'd call tough action. Why did he do nothing about the Wintertons all those years? Why hasn't he called for a swift end to gold-plated payoffs for the worst of them? The least he could do is force them to stand down and resign now.
1 reply
Congratulations on setting up the campaign. However, I really don't think your first video is going to persuade a single potential non racist protest BNP voter not to do so. When the real issue is voters' disgust over the MPs and the whole conduct of Parliamentary politics, this just won't wash. Here's an analysis of why, and what the answer to the BNP should be. http://tinyurl.com/o4yups I'm not a Tory--though I did vote for Boris to get rid of Livingstone--but so far only Cameron has even begun to show some understanding of what's needed. But it's nothing like enough.
1 reply