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BeingAKB
New York, NY
Recent Activity
Greg, I think your article is spot on! This fall I'm launching a service that does exactly what you're talking about for musicians (helping musicians outsource stuff like marketing, research, and administrative work like studio booking and filing paperwork). I've been helping artists out with their marketing and they say it takes a whole lot of pressure off of them. Seems like that's the way the industry is headed, which is great! Musicians should be able to focus on their creativity and not be bogged down with trivial work.
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Been waiting for Tuesday. I spent the majority of my grad school experience interning for one of the WMG executives. It will be really interesting to read Goodman's take on Bronfman's tenure. Hitting the download button on my Kindle as soon as I wake up!
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Thanks for pointing that Mashable article out. Independent artist/songwriter PJ Morton uses fan meetups a lot, and I'm organizing some for my clients now. They really work!
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Greetings All! Having a fun time learning about other Hypebot readers! I'm Alandis and frequently read Hypebot. I just graduated from New York University's Graduate Music Business program and have started an artist services company. Go Forth Strategic aims to provide support services to independent artists similar to those that a label would provide for their artists. Right now we're focusing on digital strategies and fan relationship management, but will soon be expanding to services such as A&R administration and sponsorships. We want the artist to focus on creativity and leave everything else to us! I'm excited about the direction the music industry is heading in and am down for collaborations. I want to hear about everybody else! Let's go! Alandis B. akb@beingakb.com http://www.twitter.com/beingakb http://www.beingakb.com
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Just finished the NYU Music Business Program this May! Hit me at @BeingAKB. We should link up sometime.
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I'll be there. Hope to meet everyone!
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I agree wholeheartedly with your recommendations, particularly Seth Godin and Malcolm Gladwell. Gladwell's case study on Kenna in "Blink" was wonderful, and for the past few months I'm been going through Godin's books and blog, walking away with something new each time. I also think that "Authenticity" and "The Experience Economy," both by B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore, are great reads for musicians and music industry entrepreneurs alike. They present some interesting opinions on the importance of maintaining authenticity and creating experiences worthy of consumers' (or in our case, fans') time and money. Other Authors/Books I recommend: Noah Kerner and Gene Pressman - Chasing Cool great perspective on marketing/branding Gray Hamel and C.K. Prahalad - Competing For The Future It's a long read, but worth it. Stresses strategies for focusing on what's next and moving a company forward instead of trying to become "the next iPod"
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I totally agree. Yet another example of labels failing to embrace the ease of use and profitability that a strong digital strategy offers...
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2009 on Why Is No Susan Boyle Download Available? at hypebot
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Let me preface this by saying that I'm coming from an urban music background and have spent the past year working on a thesis about urban music consumption and marketing practices. With that being said, full-length albums make very little sense in today's market. There's a place for them, but only once an artist has proved himself/herself album worthy. I hate to use this guy as an example, but look at SouljaBoy. This guy sales MILLIONS of ringtones and recently had the #3 song on Billboard's Hot 100, but his sophomore album was released in December 2008 and as of last week had yet to sale 200,000 copies. That's just inexcusable. It makes no sense for ringtone sales from that album to be so disproportionate from full album sales. Interscope could have saved a lot of money of marketing and production if they switched him over to just releasing singles and ringtones. It's not a stretch to say that Souljaboy doesn't have an album's worth of stuff to say. It's time for record companies to embrace the state of the industry. Mr. Perry hinted at the days of 45s, and I believe those days have in essence returned (at least for urban music). Sure, a lot of it had to do with the technological limitations of the records, but brevity was key back then. It's a great way to develop artists. I believe that mp3 "leaks" and singles are the "new" way to build buzz, and that certain genres lend themselves to the single format. Record companies need to stop shoving full albums that only have 3 songs worth listening to down consumers' throats. It would cut so many production/marketing budgets in half. This is not to say that the album should die. There are plenty of artists I'd love to hear full albums from, like The Roots, Jill Scott, Janelle Monae, etc. But these artists are album worthy. I trust that they can provide an album with 12 notable songs instead of Souljaboy's offering of 4 singles and 8 fillers. Again, not knocking Souljaboy. He's good at what he does and his songs are hits on mobile phones and at parties, but I can guarantee you that I won't be reminiscing about his album with my kids 20 years from now.
Toggle Commented Apr 15, 2009 on In Defense Of The Album at hypebot
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Great diagram/theory. I definitely agree with the theory that building a "tribe" is the way to create a sustained career in the current music industry. Looking forward to the article.
Toggle Commented Nov 24, 2008 on One View Of The Musical Middle Class at hypebot
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I think its a combination of Apple not having to and not wanting to go DRM-free. Yeah, their chokehold on the music industry is slowly lossening, but they still have "hand" in the situation. Their advantage isn't going away anytime soon. And as long as Apple keeps releasing products, their closed system works best for them. That way, they guarantee their vendors/business partners an audience.
Toggle Commented Oct 20, 2008 on Why Hasn't Apple's iTunes Gone DRM Free? at hypebot
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WOW! I was just talking about this concept at my internship yesterday! I totally agree. For some reason, label execs feel that they need to get 10-14 tracks for an album to be complete and squander marketing dollars when, as you said, you can't force a hit anymore. The EP is definitely the way to go. LP albums have their place, but they were originally put out as concept albums by artists such as Stevie Wonder, The Beatles, Pink Floyd, and Marvin Gaye. The availability of music online, low production costs (in terms of both studio costs and the costs to create the retail product) are incredibly low, and the fact that the internet created the "short-attention span" consumer all point to the releasing more products with fewer songs on them. And serving niches is the exact way to do it. Have we forgotten the successes of labels like Motown that spent large amounts of time developing their artists and thrived off of releasing singles to a targeted market? Just like changes in technology made LPs possible, another large technology shift has made them unprofitable. The industry should take heed and focus on developing the artists' career and long-term profitability. Great article!
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This is a great idea! Love the marketing strategies! http://www.twitter.com/UrbanMusicBiz http://www.urbanmusicbiz.com
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This was ineveitable. I'm interested in seeing how they plan on enticing users to buy the music. Sure, the store will be there, but will people spend money?
Toggle Commented Oct 8, 2007 on Facebook May Launch iTunes Competitor at hypebot
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