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Anthony Thorne
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Amusing to see the (over)reaction. I picture Lex as a minor character drawn with steam coming out of his ears and swirling cyclonic voids for eyes from Robert Crumb's HUP, chasing after Devil Girl yet doused with a deus ex machina bucket of unsavory gloop in the final panel. Glenn - your blog, your house, your hospitality. Kudos to you - you've been way more tolerant than I would have been. Criterion just announced a NIGHT OF THE HUNTER Blu-Ray too.
That all looks great. The only cinema in Melbourne I think that compares is the Astor cinema, which William Friedkin raved about while he was down here screening a new print of SORCERER. Before reading the blog proper, the messiah title made me think it was going to be about Verhoeven's new JESUS OF NAZARETH hardcover. A restored Blu of COMMANDMENTS would be very nice.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2010 on Your messiah, now at Some Came Running
There's another, funny school of thought, backed up by some clever, detailed analysis, that reads Harper's final expression as being (possible SPOILER of interpretation) indicative that Suzy Banyon was a witch herself all along, and now fully realises it at the end. I won't say that's the ultimate rationale behind the story, but if you go that route and watch the film carefully there are a number of clues, bold and subtle, that make the suggestion. If folks haven't seen the semi-sequel to SUSPIRIA, INFERNO, I think they should.
I agree this sucks, though I'm curious about the Alan Jones / Kim Newman commentary track. I believe the documentary features Xavier Mendik, not really one of my favorite Eurocult critics. The latest American Cinematographer features a big article and interview with Luciano Tovoli, discussing the photography of SUSPIRIA in revelatory detail. Happily, you can read it in its entirety online at the following link: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/ac/ac0210/?ap=1#/72 The screenshots in the interview don't seem to have the same problems as the UK (and Italian) Blu-Ray transfers. Take note, the article also states without elaboration that SUSPIRIA is coming to US Blu-Ray "in the Spring". Fingers all crossed that it'll be a new transfer.
The double post was unintentional, BTW. Only just cottoned on to the fact that this is a 3 pages comments thread, and after I waded through the intermittent snark up to this point saw that my brilliant comment has appeared twice - sorry. Glenn also has nothing to apologise about for the lingerie shot of Jane Leeves - don't know if she was a Benny Hill dancer (love those Hill's Angels) but she did appear as a boobs-out angel in the final number of MONTY PYTHON'S MEANING OF LIFE.
'He does have this to say about the Carpenter version though: "Much of the original Haloween, despite being shot in California and it showing at times, is about the rhythms and realities of growing up in the suburbs."' I agree with Zombie, actually - the Jamie Lee Curtis character doesn't smoke pot in the first Halloween film (if she ever does, it must be very fleeting) but there's a lot of attention paid to her walking leisurely down the street, meandering, overseeing the kids watching TV, chatting on the phone, looking out the school window, hanging out with the girls, chatting in the car etc, all frequently shot with Carpenter and Cundey's long takes and slow, drifting camera. Zombie's description of the film pertaining in that way to the 'rhythms and realities' of teens growing up in the suburbs is clever and apt, not 'far from the point' at all. Carpenter's "Halloween" differs from the countless other slasher clones it inspired precisely because of those tangential evocations of teen living (reminding me of Danny Peary's comparison of 'Halloween' to 'Carrie', noting that he felt Carpenter viewed the behaviour of teenage girls with affection and bemusement, while De Palma held a grudge). I haven't seen '1000 Corpses' but like 'Devil's Rejects' a lot, the latter playing as an energised amalgam of Hooper/Craven backwoods redneck horror and Peckinpah's 70's work like 'Alfredo Garcia'. I'm yet to see both of the 'Halloween' remakes discussed here but I'll probably spring for the director's cuts at some point.
'He does have this to say about the Carpenter version though: "Much of the original Haloween, despite being shot in California and it showing at times, is about the rhythms and realities of growing up in the suburbs."' I agree with Zombie, actually - the Jamie Lee Curtis character doesn't smoke pot in the first Halloween film (if she ever does, it must be very fleeting) but there's a lot of attention paid to her walking leisurely down the street, meandering, overseeing the kids watching TV, chatting on the phone, looking out the school window, hanging out with the girls, chatting in the car etc, all frequently shot with Carpenter and Cundey's long takes and slow, drifting camera. Zombie's description of the film pertaining in that way to the 'rhythms and realities' of teens growing up in the suburbs is clever and apt, not 'far from the point' at all. Carpenter's "Halloween" differs from the countless other slasher clones it inspired precisely because of those tangential evocations of teen living (reminding me of Danny Peary's comparison of 'Halloween' to 'Carrie', noting that he felt Carpenter viewed the behaviour of teenage girls with affection and bemusement, while De Palma held a grudge). I haven't seen '1000 Corpses' but like 'Devil's Rejects' a lot, the latter playing as an energised amalgam of Hooper/Craven backwoods redneck horror and Peckinpah's 70's work like 'Alfredo Garcia'. I'm yet to see both of the 'Halloween' remakes discussed here but I'll probably spring for the director's cuts at some point.
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Feb 8, 2010