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Aohanian
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Jane, thanks for having started this seven years ago and for continuing for being your insights into this area today. Note to others checking out this slideshare – key finding are on slide 7. They point to a future of learning that is individually focused, cloud based, and which shows little distinguish between learning, work, business and personal.
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Jane, I like your new principles for learning. I would just ask this question: where does the alignment to the business fit? I appreciate that it is outside each of the three groups so its exclusion is deliberate, but, do you think it changes as we move towards unstructured learning?
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Jane, I very much like the distinction between directed, structured knowledge sharing and unstructured, self-directed knowledge sharing. My take is that learning consist of more than information and knowledge – to what extent does this impact workplace skills and values?
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Stephen, thanks for highlighting the contrast between our words and actions. The greatest difference I see is usually between the espoused value “people are our greatest assets” and a modus operandi of mass recruitment sheep dipped training and remorseless grind ending in dispirited exits.
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Steve, great advice, I like your focus on changing your reactions and accepting the MDR of behavior you can expect.
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Stephen, thanks for the clarification and expansion of the point. Yes, accountability for success and failure is crucial – the hard part is making it mutual. Too often, managers take all the credit for success and direct reports all the blame for failure.
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Steve, you’re right that people consistently make a decision at a certain age, but you’re also right that every morning we get up and every moment we live, we have a choice as to how that moment will be. I take inspiration from your posting and will endeavour to keep feeling “better for every moment and day I have left” Ara.
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Steve, one thing I learnt early in my career that will help with both confusion and conflict is “The Golden Silence”. The Golden Silence is the time you leave after asking a difficult question. It can seem like eternity but it’s usually around a mere seven seconds. If you can keep your nerve and say nothing, someone else will break the silence and they’ll usually fill it with something of great value.
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Jane, thanks for again running the Top Ten Tools. It’s a great barometer of the way we work today and it’s fascinating to see how it changes over time. My own tool for learning: my bike. Getting out of the office and taking some exercise frees me from the constraints of the workplace and lets me reflect. By the end of my bike ride I’ve usually discovered something I didn’t know or solved a problem that’s been bugging me for ages.
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I’d add a final observation to add to your observation. 55 is not the end point. Even if you’re feeling bitter you can still turn things around. After a life time of inadvertently following your advice I’m definitely “better” and only see 55 as the half way point.
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Jane, I like the idea of moving from the organizational management of learning (the process driven training mindset) to the idea of supporting learning in different ways including social. This is far more business-focused than the traditional approach as well as more effective.
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Steve, the cheetah is a powerful animal but it’s a loner. Businesses succeed today through collaboration. My take is that leaders would do better to take the pack hunting lion as a true metaphor for successful leadership: patience, collaboration and a willingness to strike fast when necessary.
Toggle Commented Jul 16, 2013 on Stamina and Leadership at All Things Workplace
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Steve, good sense about meetings is hard to find. Thanks for sharing your tips. The most frustrating meetings I attend are those where people with useful contributions to make are not given space in the conversation by dominant types. It’s a waste of everyone’s time in the meeting and of that person’s talent.
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2013 on Halt: Meeting Traps Ahead at All Things Workplace
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Stephen, you’re right retention of learning is a systems problem. I would go further than that. Retention is a by product of learning and talent management processes that focus on business value. If the learner and his/her manager see no use for what is being taught and fail to provide opportunities for putting it into practice, then the effort was wasted in the first place. As my colleague Tarik Taman observes: focusing on the individual activity of learning misses the point. What matters is the aim of business improvement within a particular organizational context.
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Steve, you’re right, the opposite of hands on management is not hands off. Leaders are paid to give clarity of direction, and – importantly – a supportive environment.
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Steve, a good snappy view of coaching and your third point is essential. No one mechanism has a monopoly on success and that certainly includes coaching. An additional point: if coaching (or any other intervention) might work now it may not necessarily work in the future. Always make sure to revisit your list with brutal honesty.
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Stephen, you’re one hundred percent right about managers and the role they play in learning. They are crucial not least because they determine what their direct reports spend time on. But I would question whether managers can become “curators of performance related information.” They simply don’t have the time. Instead, I would argue, it’s L&D’s job to work with managers and employees to develop sufficient domain expertise to be effective curators.
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Thanks for this insight into learner motivation. One key point to remember about motivation is this: we don’t control most learners’ motivation. In fact peoples learning motivation in fact largely determined by their managers and by their peers. Achieving successful elearning is therefore as much about getting these people on board as it is about good content design.
Stephen you spell this out very clearly, as you said “It’s not complicated. Understand how the learning intervention is intended to help the organization achieve its goals.” That is the core of understanding the impact of training and any learning intervention
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Steve, kudos to you! I always say that there is no point sticking in a place where you’re changing faster than the organization. And you’re right, in those circumstances the only thing to do is be honest with yourself and your boss and then take that leap of faith to a new environment.
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Steve. Every leader would love to imagine they are a sleek, nippy cheetah. But as you say, they’re no good in a marathon. The truth is, most successful leaders are more like elephants. Fast when they have to be; collaborative (unlike the lonesome cheetah), enduring, and above all, they have a great memory. Elephants survive in tough conditions because they are smart and that’s how businesses survive today.
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Steve I will add one extra point to your four – wait for an answer. When people having difficulty responding to a question it usually means their answer is important. When you pose one of your questions be silent and count in your head up to 8. It may seem like an eternity but that is the time the other person will need to answer a tough question. Usually longer you wait the better and more valuable the answer would be.
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Steve, those two words are vital, not just in presentations but in every communication: whenever we open our mouths to speak or write an email, we should always bear in mind the “so what” our listener or reader will be asking themselves.
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Steve, the personal thinking is great but it’s the coffee machine that really excites me. Just one question: I’m going to need a different cup of coffee in the morning to what I need after dinner. Is the RFID smart enough to choose my coffee according to the time of day? Some mornings I might need that help!
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Steve, you should get Julie to blog more often! It’s true that very few organizations will support learning for its own sake in contrast to organizations that support learning because it has the right culture. From the training department’s point of view that absolutely means we have to kindle the habit of supporting personal development. But there’s also a role here for leaders. They need to challenge employees to do their best and then support them in their road to success. In this approach to work, learning is a natural part of achieving your goals rather than something that is grafted on.
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