This is Robert McCarty's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Robert McCarty's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Robert McCarty
I'm writing books for dog lovers and children.
Interests: Friendship and family, books, , travel, films, dogs, peace, soccer, learning, joy and laughter...
Recent Activity
Image
“Inevitably they find their way into the forest. It is there that they lose and find themselves. It is there that they gain a sense of what is to be done. The forest is always large, immense, great and mysterious. No one ever gains power over the forest, but the forest posses the power to change lives and alter destinies.” Jack Zipes, The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests to the Modern World Continue reading
Image
Long, long ago, when the first fairy tales were being dreamed up, mothers were always on the verge disappearing. To be an adult woman was to live a precarious existence at best. . . In those days, you had to create something you could leave behind to light the path, to keep throwing those bread crumbs, to clear the thorns from the thicket. A tree or a ghost or a bear or a good fairy—but something, something to outlast you. . .A mother had to bequeath a gift, a story. And a daughter had to be ready. For her mother’s disappearance—and for her own, too. -- Amber Sparks Lit Hub Continue reading
Image
Survival has been an an issue for much of humanity. So fairy tales, folk tales, stories from the oral tradition, are all of them the most vital connection we have with the imaginations of the ordinary men and women whose labor created our world.” ― Angela Carter Continue reading
Image
The Brothers Grimm appear to have helped motivate a large number of nineteenth century writers and scholars -- in several countries -- to record and save wonder tales, folktales, and local mythology -- to save the culture of the past. Aside from overcoming lethargy. religious beliefs, and political hubris, there were issues of language and tumultuous events to overcome. In Ireland, the issues also involved the Gaelic language and became very political. Continue reading
Image
"Many of us today have no kith. . .no ancestral place. Or we had one once, but lost it long ago. Or we've been transplanted into new soil, our roots still shallow, our claim still tenuous. Or we are homesick for a home we never actually had; for the idea of home, and of truly belonging." quote from Terri Windling Continue reading
Image
"When I was small it was believed in high-minded progressive circles that fairy tales were unsuitable for children." Continue reading
Image
Before and after the printing Press in Europe (1452), people passed on spoken tales that told in a direct, imaginative, and often entertaining way about the outrages, cruelties, and inequities of everyday life. These stories (wonder tales), told in a tavern, a market place, or a farm house could satirize directly, or by analogy, those in power -- their greed, cruelty, and incompetence, without persecution of the story teller. For example; Continue reading
Image
Joy to The World. . . The conservative British oligarchy was influenced by Tiny Tim and the three Ghosts of Christmas. And ordinary people took the message of charity to heart. The Christmas season has continued to evolve. In our era, it has become a time of celebration, charity and gift giving. And, a profitable marketplace. Continue reading
Image
Creating stories with animals behaving like people with human traits, personalities, and behaviors has a long tradition going back to Aesop. Good stories, like Aesop's Fables capture the imagination and teach. Children's literature is filled with wonderful anthropomorphic animals from Carroll's Mad Hatter and Beatrix Potter's Peter Rabbit to Milne's Pooh Bear and Grahame's Toad. From Kipling's jungle to powerful bears under a spell, the literature of the young has also become literature for YA and adults. Continue reading
Image
Amidst eons of uncertainty, tales were passed on that reflected many facets of the world, from the adventures of poor peasants, to the dilemmas of Royal ladies of the Court. They were fueled by imagination. They dealt with poverty, fear, and brutality. They satirized the powerful, amused listeners, and usually gave hope. Continue reading
Image
Actually, adult readers had been finding and reading wonder tales and fantasy since Gulliver landed in the land of the Lilliputians -- if not before. Continue reading
Image
A storm and a shipwreck were transit vehicles for Jonathan Swift in the same way that C.S. Lewis used a wardrobe to take children to Narnia; or that Lewis Carroll had Alice going down the Rabbit hole to Wonderland, or, more recently, Neil Gaiman's character, Door, in Neverwhere who was the very embodiment of a transit point.They were all transit phenomena that took characters in stories to an alternate reality, a world of fantasy. . . Continue reading
Image
"Fantasy is a different approach to reality, an alternative technique for apprehending and coping with existence. It is not antirational, but pararational; not realistic but surrealistic, a heightening of reality.. . Ursula Le Guin Continue reading
Image
Difficult challenges and trials, even those that come at a tender young age, can make us wiser, stronger, and braver; they can serve to transform us, rather than sending us limping into the future. Terri Windling Continue reading
Image
How did people endure, for centuries, the dark times of plague, famine, drought and war? Life was short and often brutal. Courage, endurance, and using your wits could mean the difference between life and death. Wonder tales were often tales of becoming, tales of overcoming the great hardships of life, even under dangerous circumstances. Continue reading
Image
Wonder Tales brought fantasy to the world and over time opened doors of the imagination for children. Books followed the books. Imagination and the mysteries of existence opened adult's minds even more. Continue reading
Image
I have mixed feeling about witches. I have compassion for the witches of the past -- from Joan of Arc to Salem and beyond -- who have been brutalised and suffered. I have mixed feelings about miracle working saints and relics. I have found the witches in Macbeth and the Wicked Witch of the West foreboding. I like the witches of Phillip Pullman and Glinda the Good Witch of Oz. I respect true healers of many kinds,.past and present. Researching and reading about witches today has been filled with new awareness of the fear and misogny behind the perception and treatment of withches. Continue reading
Image
Wonder tales are forever changing, reflections of the times, the culture, and the teller of the tale. Continue reading
Image
Fantasy lives in the imagination. Fantasy is not limited by time or place. It is limited only by the mind of the individual, young or old.. Fantasy opens the mind to possibilities, to discovery, to hope. Continue reading
Image
A Christmas Carol was the catalyst for the holiday season that we observe and celebrate today. This is a ghost story, a story of poverty, suffering, fear and redemption -- an unlikely sounding mix -- that comes together in a book that has touched people since it first appeared. Continue reading
Image
"But instead of a dream that functions in the individual psyche, the fairy tale seems to function for an entire culture. It is effectively a collective fantasy. As it is told and retold, elements of the story added by the individual teller fall away, like sifted sand, while the more universal themes remain, so it becomes valid for the group of people (the listeners) in general." Excepted from a lecture on Snow White by Nancy van-den Berg-Cook. Link: The Magic Mirror in Snow White Continue reading