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Stephen
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"The ocean can be very unforgiving". Never turn your back to the ocean, and always swim with a buddy.
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Thanks for letting me learn how to be an account executive and a sales manager.
Toggle Commented Nov 18, 2009 on Sticking to your knitting at View from the Mountain
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Great weather here in Rehoboth Beach, DE. Low 80s, sunshine, and nice breezes...been this way all last week, and this week looks just as nice.
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I still use my blue & green beach towel every summer in Rehoboth, my green fleece blanket in my basement couch, and I have bought refills for my Tournado pen. Thanks for some very thoughtful gifts.
Toggle Commented Dec 13, 2008 on The annual holiday party at View from the Mountain
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Very good, I enjoyed this piece. Always best to spend the holidays surrounded by friends and family.
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In addition to Birkenstocks, I've been a huge fan of both Keen Footwear and Merrell. http://www.keenfootwear.com/ http://www.merrell.com The only dress shoes I wear anymore are Mephisto, which are pricey, but worth every penny. Still having to dress up a few times a week, but that's OK. http://www.mephistoonlinestore.com/
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David, very glad to hear you are OK. You need a Camelbak Hydration Pack, very lightweight one that holds 2L. http://www.camelbak.com/index.cfm I fill mine halfway and then freeze it, when I take it out, I fill the remainder with water. It is superb for things like mowing, long walks with dogs, or simply clip it onto the back of my beach chair. I like it because it keeps my hands free for whatever activity I'm doing, and mine has a small waterproof pouch for Blackberry, wallet, and keys, plus bungees for my raingear. Again, very lightweight, I hardly know it is there. Glad to hear you are OK, please take it easy.
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You need greater spiritual fulfillment. I recommend boarding the Orange Line (affectionately nicknamed "The Orange Crush") westbound at rush hour from Farragut West to Vienna. You can just quietly stand there, nothing can disturb your tranquility for probably 30-45 minutes just smelling the stench of bodies all pressed together. Sometimes it is almost hard to leave the train, and you ride the escalator up feeling refreshed and happy at such a pleasant experience.
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I've in the same boat. Looking forward to your recipe, as I do love good bread. Not impressed with either store quality or price these days.
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I fundamentally believe this entire real estate bubble and artificial wealth is NOT merely the result of speculators and low interest rates. Rather, if you look further at the cause, is that people want desirable real estate because the transportation infrastructure in the United States is so weak compared to what it could have been. We're jam packed around cities and coasts because of transportation inefficiencies AND archaic real estate zoning laws. While there will always be people who will pay a premium for ocean sites, there is a limit to desirable real estate which leads to artificially high prices.
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I recommend some nice relaxing Beltway traffic, or perhaps the I66 Tango? Preferably in a manual transmission with a long clutch like a Ford Mustang. If that isn't enough to sooth the nerves, then how about a nice commute into the District during renovations and events? http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/09/29/AR2007092901139.html I know you miss it...
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How do you get roped (insert bad Brokeback Mountain pun) into these chick flicks? We just end up going to separate movies. We also have our own Netflix accounts. ;-]
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Blackberry Pearl is all you need. Unless I have serious proposal work due or an iLife project, I rarely cart my Powerbook along these days.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2007 on Leave the computers home at View from the Mountain
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A wise man like you with more money than common sense ought to cash in your remaining Apple stock and buy a Louis Vuitton pet carrier. http://www.shopcandycouture.com/servlet/the-Louis-Vuitton-cln-Pet-Carriers/Categories
Toggle Commented Dec 31, 2006 on The cat whisperer at View from the Mountain
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http://www.twainquotes.com/quotesatoz.html "When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years."
Toggle Commented Dec 27, 2006 on The apology at View from the Mountain
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Navigating Tyson's Corner Malls are no problem, that's home for me. However, I found a place even more chaotic and crowded during my recent visit to the London Apple Store on Regent Street, between Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus. Wow, massive wave of people, and watch your wallet.
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Xmas wish list. -Xbox 360 and lifetime Gold Subscription -Mercedes Benz S65 AMG with European Delivery (Black Forest/Alps Rally Package) -BMW 760IL with armor plating and AC Schnitzer custom wheel and body package (20 inch dubs) -Gulfstream G5 -Dolce & Gabanna v3 Razr phone -Samsung 103 inch plasma flat screen -Bang & Olufson Serene phone -Case of 1961 Bordeaux Lafite Rothschild or 81 Cheval Blanc -Chairman of the Board Suit Package at Hong Kong Grand Tailors -Weekend golf package at St. Andrews or Pebble Beach
Toggle Commented Dec 6, 2006 on Christmas list time at View from the Mountain
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I agree on both the criticality of email for business communications, as well as the concept of outsourcing it for small businesses. 1. We are a very satisfied small business using Mi8 (http://www.mi8.com, recently acquired by Apptis) for our email hosting. Mi8 is are superb, totally focused on customer service and customer satisfaction, and support flexible requirements for small, medium, and large businesses, to include Blackberry, Treo, and Windows Mobile support. They also support OS X and Linux users via IMAP and Webmail. 2. Outsourcing your email (and many of your IT needs) puts your IT expenditures in the "expenses" category of your balance sheet rather than the "assets". Think about this: Regular, predictable software/services costs on a monthly or annual basis rather than depreciating assets and unused, expensive software licenses. Several years down the road, when you are ready to sell your company or merge with another, you can either offer some old Pentium III Servers and copies of Exchange 5.5 (maybe the manuals are still around) as "assets", or something more viable on your balance sheet. What is important is the data that you own and can migrate as necessary. Given that the majority of an organization's intellectual property resides in the email correspondence, certainly something to consider.
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I am a huge fan of the iPhoto coffee table books, and try to make one about every major trip I take, or significant events otherwise (weddings, college, Army). The challenge is really pre-2001, before digital cameras became mainstream. Obviously the scanning is time consuming, but worthwhile once you get the hang of it. The bindings and paper appear to be extremely durable. Obviously, we'll see how long they last after years of being passed around and looked at, but isn't that the point? Speaking of points, you delve into one of my favorite topics, news and print. A voracious consumer, for dailies, I take the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal. NY Times on Sunday, and Vienna Times on Wed. Periodicals include Time, the Economist, BusinessWeek, and Vanity Fair. What I like about print is that it allows you to escape the limitations of screen, as well as the 8.5 X 11 constraints. I love the full page graphics that show multiple variables in multiple colors that can convey so much meaning. If you haven't been to a Tufte seminar, his books are spectacular. Visual Explanations Envisioning Information Visual Display of Quantitative Information However, the online news outlets are catching up, and they are invaluable when you don't have access to the print version, or they have an impressive multimedia display. The WSJ & BusinessWeek have some excellent feature sets with both Flash and video, which obviously print can't recreate. I believe these are complementary features which I like for both print and online. I have a relative who has failing eyesight, and each year I give her the NY Times Large Type edition, which is a weekly. She loves it, since she can't read the local paper since the type is too difficult for her to read. I don't believe the old adage is true anymore about the only time someone should appear in print is at birth, marriage, and death.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2006 on The morning newspaper at View from the Mountain
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How many blue books did you go through on your exam? ;-]
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The drive from DC to the Delaware short yesterday was especially brutal. We were unable to depart until 1400, and almost two hours to get across the Bay bridge, in a trip that is ordinarily an hour. To add insult to injury, by the time I made it to the VFW Chicken Stand in Greenwood, DE, the doors were closed, and the signed was posted "Sorry Sold Out". However, it is Fletcher's first time to the ocean, and the little Siberian Husky is quite enamored with all the activity, wind, sand, and waves. Unfortunately, that coat of his appears to catch all the water and sand. What I really need is are helicoper landing pads in Bethany and Vienna, and a Blackhawk on call. I could have a beater truck at each end...wishful thinking I suppose.
Toggle Commented Aug 12, 2006 on A change in the weather at View from the Mountain
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Time to blast the little buggers into oblivion. These are not cute little Bambi types, that will go on to a starring role in a Disney movie. Pests, nuisance, vermin who destroy property, must be discouraged from foraging in civilized areas. I think someone had mentioned investing in in the motion sensor light or sprinkler system, which would also be a viable alternative.
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Most Fortunate 500 companies have a counseling methodology that they use when implementing performance management. It is called SMART counseling, and the way it works, is that the employee drafts his goals for the quarter or year, whatever the period of performance is, and reviews them with their manager. S: Specific M: Measureable A: Attainable R: Relevant T: Timebound At the end of the period of performance, it is very easy to determine if the employee met the goals, or did not. The really good managers will craft this counseling in such a way that the employee knows not only what they have to do to meet the standard, but what is expected of them should they aspire to be in the top 10%, exceeding the standard over the other employees. A great organization with good leaders and managers will inspire a team of employees, with open communications, and where everyone knows everyone else's goals, and will do their best to help each other achieve them, and at best will be incentivized to do so. These types of leaders and managers inspire loyalty, hard work, and devotion to duty, and almost always result in revenues exceeding goal. A dysfunctional organization, with demoralized employees, and incompetent, insecure management (note: I did not say leadership), will instill a culture of secrecy and knowledge hoarding. A management style pitting employees against each other, with secretive, generic goals which are subjectively evaluated, and not measured against other employees. These types of managers are cowards, insecure in their own capabilities, and must boost their own self esteem by cronyism, negative comments, and are surrounded by lickspittles who eat their own. Hmm...where would YOU rather work?
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With Writely, Thumbstacks, and now Google Spreadsheets, we're well on our way to a new era of Microsoft free applications. http://www.google.com/googlespreadsheets/tour1.html I had a chance to help my new beach neighbor, a physician with his old Dell PC. He didn't have the full version of MS Office, he had Word, Excel and Publisher, but not Powerpoint. A colleague gave his a lecture on a floppy disk with a Powerpoint presentation on it. We took the old laptop over to my house, both for the high speed connectivity, as well as some Balvenie Doublewood, in order to download Open Office for Windows. I was actually pretty impressed with the functionality, and after we upgraded his Windows 2000 Service Packs, Firefox, and anti-virus, we were well on our way to cardio-thorasic slide show bliss. I have to confess I've never heard of those words, let alone spell them, before. Needless to say, the good doctor was quite pleased.
Toggle Commented Jun 6, 2006 on Dance of the giants at View from the Mountain
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There is a counter point to be made that the estate/death tax is yet another form of double taxation. The money earned has already been taxes, and merely because one builds a legacy to live to their children and families, should they be penalized for it? In the cut spending camp, I support: -subsidaries to the excavation industries (coal, gas, mining, steel, agriculture, tobacco) -pork projects in the omnibus/Christmas Tree bill -keeping open unneeded military bases -Federal flood insurance for those that choose to live near the coast in flood prone areas. -Drastic reform of the Department of Education (and teacher's unions). In the boost revenues camp, I support: -progressive, consumption based tax, rather than income based or capital gains -elimination of rent control -increased sin taxes for alcohol, tobacco -elimination of laws that limit property tax increases (California currently has one such law on the books). -mileage based fuel tax, based upon the number of cars you own. (own one car that gets great mileage, lower personal property tax, own three gas guzzlers, increased personal property tax). In other words, we reward good behavior by allowing people to keep more of their own money, and we penalize selfish or greedy behavior by making them pay government for it.
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