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Brent Green
I'm an author, speaker, creative director and marketing consultant focused on the Baby Boomer Generation.
Interests: Fitness, candid photography, business writing, fiction writing, intelligent movies and books, European travel, gourmet cooking, wilderness trekking
Recent Activity
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Much of today's successful citizen engagement has been influenced by the late-1960s and early-1970s. Fifty years ago, motivated college and university students from the Boomer generation molded the strategies and tactics of modern democratic mobilization. Cause-related activism and protest demonstrations are fundamental to the success of The American Story. Citizens have been assembling and speaking truth to power for over 244 years. Promoting constructive change is central to the nation’s DNA. Boomers added their passionate voices to the refrain for... Continue reading
Posted Dec 15, 2020 at Boomers
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Do younger generations understand the events leading up to the unusual happenings of the 60s and 70s? A good question, inviting a rhetorical question. How much do you understand about the Civil War? Do you recall the significant battles, major turning points, and the commanding personalities who influenced the outcome? Probably you know a lot if you’re a history buff, but you’ll never understand that war the same way that those who lived through it did. This is an underlying... Continue reading
Posted Oct 14, 2020 at Boomers
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When we depart this life, must the stories of our existence fade within the passing of a few years? That has been the fate of billions of mortals who have preceded today’s living. Since the beginning of human history around 50,000 B.C., 108 billion humans have been born. Just over seven billion are living now, or 6.5 percent of all those ever born are still breathing—a tiny fraction when we consider the meteoric growth of world population today. How much... Continue reading
Posted Sep 15, 2020 at Boomers
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Quentin Tarantino doesn’t understand 1969, one of the most chaotic, challenging, and compelling years of the 20th century. He's not a reliable historian. Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2019 at Boomers
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"The most transformative year in U.S. history" — Rolling Stone 1969 stood as the final year of a tumultuous decade, shattering domestic tranquility with epic events and cultural trends. Consider Woodstock, the most famous music festival of modern times, attracting over 400,000 rock ‘n’ roll fans. Or NASA’s Apollo 11 space mission and astronaut Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon. Or the October 15th Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam, the largest peaceful protest of a war in... Continue reading
Posted Feb 19, 2019 at Boomers
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If you would conduct a worldwide opinion survey to discover one wish for the future of humanity shared across societies and cultures, chances are that universal yearning would be for peace. A world without war and strife, without sectarian violence, without the omnipresent threat of terrorism, certainly these are among our most cherished but unrequited dreams. Boomers attached themselves to an idealistic quest for world peace early in their adult lives. Some demonstrated for peace. Some molded lifestyles eschewing violence,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 31, 2018 at Boomers
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Generational Sociology and Boomers Karl Mannheim (1893 — 1947), a founding father of the field of sociology, conceived the essence of generational theory through a seminal 1923 essay entitled "The Problem of Generations." Mannheim insisted that when a youth cohort faces substantial turmoil during its formative years between ages 12 and 25, a sense of generational identification strengthens. ERA march in 1976 is a precursor to the Women's Marches of 2017 and 2018 The leading-edge of the Boomer generation came... Continue reading
Posted Jan 22, 2018 at Boomers
Churches have had declining attendance for several decades, and today only 20% of Americans attend weekly services. Between 4,000 and 7,000 churches close their doors yearly. Can churches turn this around? In my keynote address at a national conference for leaders of The United Methodist Church, appropriately called Boomerstock, I emphasized novel generational strategies, coupled with intelligent branding and marketing tactics. My recommendations boil down to two fundamental marketing principles: 1) understand the target market — in this case Baby... Continue reading
Posted Dec 19, 2017 at Boomers
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Waking from a fitful dream, he struggled out of bed and stumbled to a barred window. From this perspective in the asylum, he beheld a clear night, a large morning star enchanting him. The sight of stars always inspired him. Just as we take a train from Paris to Amsterdam, he thought, we take death to go to a star. About a year later, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest. He was 37 years old. Life... Continue reading
Posted Nov 8, 2017 at Boomers
Some of us are intimately familiar with every outdated technical skills demonstrated in a classic TV ad from Apple. The spot follows an unassuming archivist working in an ancient building. Shelves bulge with film reels, photos and negatives. With a gentle gaze, the stooping man orchestrates his antique tools to bring celluloid memories alive. The final result, a short documentary film called “Together,” appears miraculously on a young mother’s iPhone somewhere else in the world. Images of her young family... Continue reading
Posted Sep 11, 2017 at Boomers
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The Woodstock Music and Art Fair has been described as a watershed, seminal, formative, game changing, and with dozens of superlatives. Those who’ve attempted to contain the Baby Boomer generation in a tidy sociological package have pointed at Woodstock in summary, sometimes with derision for the Bacchanalian overtones this word can represent. Scheduled over three days on a dairy farm in New York from August 15 to 17, 1969,Woodstock means little until you place it in larger context of a... Continue reading
Posted Aug 16, 2017 at Boomers
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With nearly 10,845 Baby Boomers reaching age 65 daily during 2018, a transformative portrait of retirement travel is emerging. Boomers view travel as fundamental to their next chapter, a time they anticipate being the most enjoyable and liberating of their lives. They have an annual travel spending power of $120 billion. (Skift) The opportunities for suppliers of travel experiences have never been greater. According to Age Wave and Merrill Lynch, Boomer retirees will celebrate over 125 billion hours of potential... Continue reading
Posted Aug 7, 2017 at Boomers
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This is a true story about how 12-year-old Darci Lynne Farmer gave my brilliant next-door neighbor hope for a future he would not live to see. A sparkling YouTube video of the Oklahoma City ventriloquist's audition for America's Got Talent would be the last video he would ever watch. When my wife, Becky, and I walked into the Intensive Care Unit at St. Joseph’s Hospital that bright June day, he seemed as lucid as I remembered him during our many... Continue reading
Posted Jul 26, 2017 at Boomers
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This is not a blog about religion, nor is it a political blog. Rather, Boomers blog has maintained a clear generational focus since its inauguration in June 2005. Sometimes religion and politics have generational implications, and this is specifically true for a new movie released ten days before the 2017 Easter Sunday and entitled The Case for Christ. This odyssey follows the real-life story of Lee Strobel, a Boomer born in 1952. Receiving a degree in journalism from the University... Continue reading
Posted Apr 10, 2017 at Boomers
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As is the situation for most readers over age 50, I have lost many significant persons in my life. After each loss, I grieved privately, rarely reaching out to others when I could have used some advice or a steady shoulder. I went through the stages of grief on my own. Then last year I lost my sister to stage IV lung cancer, leaving me as the final surviving member of my nuclear family. I did not seek grief support... Continue reading
Posted Dec 18, 2016 at Boomers
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This is the fourth installment of a multi-part series. Begin by reading Part One and Part Two and Part Three. A Trend Emerges Cultural historians and social psychologists examine the human psyche and behavior from different perspectives; yet, both disciplines articulate similar observations about what human beings do and don’t do. Historians can tell us what happened at a certain point in time; psychologists sometimes inform us of why we humans do what we do under conditions occurring at those... Continue reading
Posted Aug 16, 2016 at Boomers
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This is the third installment of a multi-part series. Begin by reading Part One and Part Two. With a thought leader firmly ensconced, peripatetic Boomers only needed uncomplicated access to the plethora of outdoor equipment then being conceived and manufactured by a nascent industry. That niche became filled by Recreational Equipment Incorporated, or REI as the company is more widely known today. Organized as a consumers' cooperative in 1938, REI was founded by Mary and Lloyd Anderson in Seattle, Washington.... Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2016 at Boomers
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This is the second installment of a multi-part series. Begin by reading Part One. From Carrying a Load to Carrying a Life Ultralight backpacking places emphasis on carrying the lightest and simplest equipment safely possible. Enthusiasts discard nonessential pack weight as a path to physical and emotional liberation. Ardent backpackers are scrupulous souls who shave ounces from their backpacks. They leave superfluous equipment at home. They disdain wasted effort due to poor pre-trip planning or ignorance of lighter alternatives. This... Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2016 at Boomers
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This is the first installment of a multi-part series. The Colorado Trail meandered ahead through an unyielding expanse of tundra above timberline. A hot June sun pushed the temperature above 80 degrees, an early summer day sweltering and unusual for that time of year. Sweat drenched my T-shirt, and my shoulders and neck ached from an unrelenting pack burden amplified by gravity. Our equipment was outdated, presenting a dual challenge of inefficiency and brutality. Our North Face VE-24 expedition dome... Continue reading
Posted Apr 11, 2016 at Boomers
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A Relentless Sense of Generational Identification Inspires Boomers to Change Aging and Dying Back in June 2000, I grabbed the newest issue of TIME magazine from an airport newsstand. One of the articles teased on the cover had an arresting title: "Twilight of the Boomers." The generation at that point ranged in age from 36 to 54. Twilight? Really? Boomers were then in the peak years of middle age, hardly time for a twilight. I kept reading to discover one... Continue reading
Posted Mar 3, 2016 at Boomers
Thanks for sharing your opinion, Derek. If you read any of my books, you'll see that I'm usually pretty harsh concerning advertisers that throw down Boomer stereotypes. And, yes, stereotypical ads are often created by those who only have secondhand experience with Woodstock and the sixties. However, the “Memory Lane” ad inspires me because of the compensating narratives of generativity and family. The humor is not an indictment of an entire generation but rather the story of one zany character from the generation. Humor simply works in advertising, especially when it hits close to home. I reflect upon at least one longtime friend whose way of reacting to situations is very reminiscent of Grandma Woodstock, and she went to the three-day festival of "peace and love." Yes, the spot veers toward cheesiness, but "it’s in a way that fits the brand well," according to "Adweek." The ad's essential purpose is to demonstrate in a memorable way that the Outback can “go anywhere.” Mission accomplished. Concerning your theory that the ad was created by "a bunch of clueless kids age 28," the director was Lance Acord, who was born on September 9, 1964. He is known for his film work on "Lost in Translation," "Being John Malkovich." and "Adaptation." The Executive Creative Director was Randy Hughes who is around age 56 and has been with Carmichael Lynch Advertising, the agency, since 1998. The copywriter was Conn Newton, in his mid-40s, who, in addition to this spot, wrote the highly mature and sobering "They Lived" campaign for Subaru. My two colleagues who agree with me about this commercial have both written and published books on Boomer marketing and advertising. Everyone is entitled to an opinion when judging art/advertising, and there will rarely be agreement, especially with commercials that are edgy and not entirely PC. The bottom line in advertising is the "bottom line," and the folks at Subaru America just announced some noteworthy sales results: *Subaru sets a new all-time sales record in December 2015 of 582,675 vehicles; up 13.4 percent over 2014 *December 2015 marks best-ever sales month in company history *49th consecutive month of year-over-year growth *Best December ever for Legacy, Forester, WRX/STI, Outback and Crosstrek *Best year ever for Forester, WRX/STI, Outback and Crosstrek *29th consecutive month of more than 10,000 Foresters sold *22nd consecutive month of more than 10,000 Outbacks sold; best Outback month ever
I am sometimes asked my opinion about which national consumer brands are truly successful from a generational marketing perspective. Matt Thornhill, founder of the Boomer Project and Generations Matter, sent me a recent email to solicit my opinion so he could better inform a magazine journalist about which marketers are most effective. Matt wrote: The actual major brands that demonstrate intelligence on how to reach Boomers are few and far between. Any that come to your mind? Frankly, I'm pretty... Continue reading
Posted Jan 26, 2016 at Boomers
"It is true that most of the older LTCi policies have had large premium increases. To protect consumers purchasing policies today, 41 states have passed strict pricing regulations. Consumers purchasing policies today are protected from the pricing mistakes of older policies." So, the same industry, and many of the same companies that sold older policies, including a policy to my wife, have corrected their misdeeds and miscalculations with the help of new state government regulations and stricter public sector oversight? That certainly gives me comfort to know my government is acting as a watchdog over the LTC insurance industry. I'm also charmed that bad-faith pricing behavior has now been cloaked in euphemistic language: "Long-Term Care Partnership Programs." I'm curious how much the LTC insurance industry has had a hand in shifting the potential burdens of consumer protection to state governments through lobbying and political influence. Further, your statistic of 7.2 million current LTC insurance policyholders seems impressive upon first glance, but there are 100 million+ consumers over age 50 in the United States, 76 million of whom are Baby Boomers. LTC insurance has not exactly caught fire with insurance consumers, and I'm guessing it's because of generally perceived deficiencies in all aspects of LTC insurance products, including the spurious costs of premiums and distrust of the industry. I have nothing to gain from critiquing LTC insurance or taking an editorial stand against these products as presently conceived. Maybe we should instead examine the benefits you derive financially, Scott, from LTC insurance before we become too reassured by your reassurances. Thanks for commenting anyway.
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We know the long-term care (LTC) insurance industry wants to storm America with its expensive and nebulous products, but few "experts" present a complete picture: the economic downsides of LTC insurance, the alternatives, and the possibilities for better insurance products in the future. Here's a truer picture of your possible future as an LTC insurance customer: "The John Hancock Life Insurance Co. just asked insurance regulators whether it could increase premiums by, on average, a whopping 45.9% on some 8,600... Continue reading
Posted Nov 11, 2015 at Boomers
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Healthy Aging Requires Men to Grow Up and Learn to Become Better Friends An accepted pillar of healthy aging involves fostering nurturing affiliations with others. The late Beatle John Lennon counseled, “Count your age by friends, not years.” One of the ruthless risks of aging is social isolation. Career contacts disappear. Older family members pass away. Nearby friends retire elsewhere. Children relocate to pursue blossoming careers. Some friends die too soon. A “third age” without rewarding friendships can make us... Continue reading
Posted Aug 10, 2015 at Boomers