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Bruce Warila
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This is a great post.
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Lucas.. No not working on this.. It just seems so common sense to me. I could have supplied a page of plumbing details, but that would further bore everyone. Cheers.
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Natalie, The weekly blurb would be a lot easier to read, especially on RSS, if you but some line breaks between the sentences. Use bullets. Cheers.
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11. Music Investing. The fact will remain that artists will need "investors" to rise above the noise. Artists / managers that can figure out what to put into a business plan that will attract/raise $1M to $5M to grow a business, will then have everything they need to do what a major label does today. All of the things a label can do, can be purchased. The problem - risk. The solution - risk mitigation...
Toggle Commented May 14, 2008 on Top 10 Issues Facing Music 2.0 at hypebot
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I would even take this one step further. The "chunk" that goes over the air does not have to exactly resemble the "chunk" that is streamable or downloadble (off-air and time-shifted). The on-air chunk can be a gateway (bait) to the off-air chunk. The off-air chunk could also contain value-add information, more content and perhaps alternative sponsors. It seems like such a logical way to leverage the resources of a radio station. Two income sources for almost the price of one. This is something interns could do... The message to listeners - expanded programming - get more when you download/stream. It's expandable radio...
Toggle Commented Apr 11, 2008 on Why your streaming strategy is all wrong at Hear 2.0
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Apple & Amazon should not be keeping any of the digital music pie. There are logical business reasons why both of these very profitable companies would benefit by returning 100% of the digital music "pie" back to labels and artists. I guarantee that someone is going to put forward a model whereby the point of sale agent keeps 0%. Now that DRM is not an issue, any label or any business can be iPod compatible. The days where companies like Apple can extract a percentage of a .99 cent sale are going to end. Apple no longer adds enough exclusive value to be keeping 30%. Microsoft - step up to the plate and do the job for 0%. I recently wrote a post on this (http://tinyurl.com/3awayn)
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Another excellent post Mark. Personalized radio won't be for just the active listener. A three button interface will make it dead simple. This probably means the adoption curve won't be as steep (more bad news for radio). It seems like old-radio could be Slacker if there was TiVo for radio.. Just a thought..
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Great post Bruce. It causes me to think about how the CDC monitors health data information for outbreaks and trends. If a virus is spreading, the CDC can see it happening graphically. Acting upon the data is an entirely different challenge. It seems like that's where the battle will be won or lost in music?
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Great post Andrew.
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Mark, Great post. One point... "Well, if the momentum for a new technology, say, HD radio, is slow at the onset it is not likely to accelerate with time. What you see is what you'll get" The chart seems to contradict that thought. Look at cassettes - starting in 1970 and peaking in 1988 - very slow start... Cheers, Bruce
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Mark, I have been reading your posts about HD radio. I get the chicken and egg problem, but I still don't understand what the obstacle is to achieving liftoff and market acceptance? It seems like HD radio is the best way to save radio? To an outsider such as myself, HD Radio seems like a no-brainer. If you score the competitive listening options - iPods, Internet radio, traditional terrestrial radio and satellite radio in a competitive matrix with price, convenience and listening-options as the weighted decision-making criteria - it seems like HD Radio is a logical winner; that is if HD radio = 40 new listening options in every market. iPods are a hassle, satellite radio is expensive (relatively speaking), Internet radio is not transportable, old-radio lacks choice, but HD radio seems to cover all of the bases for a big chunk of the market? What's a listener worth to a radio station? It seems like cost / benefit of HD Radio justifies the investment? If you are old-radio, you have to compete in the matrix loosely described above, and the only way to compete in that matrix is to massively expand choice. Am I missing something obvious?
Toggle Commented Dec 21, 2007 on All ears on HD Radio's new campaign at Hear 2.0
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iTunes + DRM = iPod Sales iTunes - DRM = MP3 Player Competition iTunes, The desktop application is now the proffered way for people to organize music. When you have a mix of tracks with DRM and tracks without DRM, the only logical choice for a player is the iPod; as most music with DRM is from Apple. As this mix tilts toward less DRM, the competitive landscape changes (MP3 players), and consumers will begin to consider alternative devices. If the majors want to try new models and device platforms they have to dump DRM. The alternative is to be stuck in a world where Apple continues to dominate the desktop and the pocket. 2 Billion songs with Apple DRM ensures iPod sales for years to come...
Toggle Commented Nov 19, 2007 on Is The March To DRM Free Stalled? at hypebot
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Dan - is that one of your dates? Yow.. Let's grab lunch next week. Jed - I here you on fan relationship management and the funnel thing. But, "show me the money". I have put out this challenge in the past. Someone please put out a list of 100 unsprung (we don't use the word unsigned) bands/artists that make a decent living from selling music/touring/merch. This is my mantra: "high-margin, reoccurring revenue". It makes this business so much better for everyone! We don't have all of the answers, but check the front of our site for our solution to this problem. This is a solution we filed patents on five years ago, and in 2008 we hope to roll this out to the world. http://www.unsprungartists.com
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2007 on Rise Of The Musical Middle Class at hypebot
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18 months ago I was all about the new middle class, I was bullish on selling digital music and on backing emerging acts. 12 months later we decided we had to reinvent our business. Over this time I came to some of the same conclusions as Glen. There are a ton great songs out there, but it's getting harder then ever to rise above the noise. In addition, I tracked 25 decent bands doing shows up and down the east coast, and I have come to the conclusion that club touring is not all that profitable either. Our solution: put products into the marketplace that put profit back into the system. The MP3 can't be the final word on digital music products. The industry, especially the middle class, needs something that generates high-margin, reoccurring revenue; as nobody wants to keep touring just to exist. In my opinion Music 2.0 hasn't even hit the oven yet; it's going to take 36-48 more months to fully bake. It's still a great time to be an artist. The good stuff hasn't even hit the technology shelf yet!
Toggle Commented Oct 30, 2007 on Rise Of The Musical Middle Class at hypebot
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Unbundling was going to happen no matter what; legally or illegally unbundling was destined to happen. The biggest enemy to the labels has been (perhaps this is changing) a lack of innovation. The fact that none of the big four have built an integrated contender to MySpace and iTunes is beyond puzzling.
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Mark - you broke this news to me... Thanks. I think this plan would be great for artists; provided that everyone can participate. Check out my post on this program. http://www.unsprungartists.com/unsprung_wisdom/2007/10/20/2007-love-for-universals-total-music-plan.html
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It's easy to divide the digital pie. All the data is tracked. You divide consumption of a single song by total consumption of all songs to get the percentage of the shareable pie owed to a single artist.
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An important step forward for digital music. -- Is Amazon going to make the pie bigger or divide it? I am doubtful that the paid download market is going to keep growing. It makes more sense for artists to give away tracks. Can anyone change my mind? A another big nail in the DRM coffin. -- Agreed. DRM is pointless. A boost for the record industry. -- Competing on price is not going to help anyone. A serious threat to every other download store. -- Artists should sell their music in every store. We are a world of tiny, tiny niches. Be everywhere and sell in every store that makes it easy for you sell in. A possible eMusic killer. -- If Amazon wants to win over every indie band on earth then return the highest percentage back to artists. When you hear Jediah (Jediah.com) standing on stage saying “go to Amazon to buy my tracks” instead of “go to iTunes” then you know Amazon is changing the competitive landscape. The iTunes killer. -- Agreed – it won’t. iTunes is going to dominate for some time to come. Amazon needs the Long Tail pushing fans to their store. The answer to all your download buying needs. -- Bundling books and consumer electronics with choice downloads. It may not be anyone’s answer to all of your downloading needs; however, grabbing a few free tracks with your lump of Harry Potter will motivate some to dabble. A mobile solution. -- Through a carrier – I don’t get it. The carriers don’t get it… iTunes via the iPhone makes sense. Everything else is just everything else. Thanks for the forum! Bruce
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Thanks for the Post on the Bronfman speech.. I just dissected and translated the most important part of this speech as it pertains to artists... http://www.unsprungartists.com/unsprung_wisdom/2007/9/18/2007-warner-ceo-bronfman-every-artist-on-earth.html Warner could be on to something.
Toggle Commented Sep 18, 2007 on Bronfman Claims "Awesome" Growth Ahead at hypebot
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