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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email APA doesn’t address this, as your question is more of a typesetting concern. As long as the text remains readable, there is nothing against having tables back to back.
Toggle Commented Oct 29, 2018 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The word “diabetes” is lowercase: Type 2 diabetes. The name of the specific clinic would be capitalized because it is considered a proper noun.
Toggle Commented Oct 29, 2018 on Do I Capitalize This Word? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email I recommend the report format for this source. I based the reference on the details I read on the official government site for the report: National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (1979). The Belmont report: Ethical principles and guidelines for the protection of human subjects of research. Retrieved from https://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/regulations-and-policy/belmont-report/read-the-belmont-report/index.html In text: (National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research, 1979) Is this congruent with what you see from students?
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Typepad HTML Email You can leave the name how it is shown on the source (“Department of Education and Training”). Good question!
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, it is fine to use the presidential memorandum legal format. Defining a source type is not always straightforward; you just have to do your best. Thank you for the links.
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Typepad HTML Email Capitalize the name of the section then too: “…in the Method sections.”
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Typepad HTML Email The answers to your questions aren’t covered in the manual. I would say to use regular all-caps…and that your question will be easy to answer if you just don’t include the scientific name.
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I’m glad to hear you’re happy! Yes, the guidance for shortened names would apply to any type of government author. It could be used for local, municipal, county, or state governments too---just be sure that the short form is clear, and if you have doubts, include more information.
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by Chelsea Lee The basic citation for a government report follows the author–date–title–source format of APA Style references. Here is a template: Reference list: Government Author. (year). Title of report: Subtitle of report if applicable (Report No. 123). Retrieved from... Continue reading
Posted Sep 25, 2018 at APA Style Blog
Your running head can be anything you want if it's less than 50 characters. It is just an abbreviated version of the title. For the first title, there are 101 characters, so no wonder it wouldn't fit! :) You could shorten it to FRACTION ISOLATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES. For the second title, you could shorten it to EFFECTIVENESS OF AEROSOL PESTICIDE---really, you can use anything you like. If you do put the scientific names in the running head (you don't have to), they should be in all caps because that is the style of the running head. For the second title, it's up to you whether you leave in "Effectiveness." It's fine either way.
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You didn’t include your example, so I can’t comment on that, but if the running head is overflowing, have you checked it for length? It should be max 50 characters including spaces.
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Typepad HTML Email Again, the report is not a recoverable source so you cannot cite it per se. You just cite the test that you took and describe in your narrative that your quotation comes from the report of your results.
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Typepad HTML Email The results of the self-assessment are not a recoverable source, so you can’t cite them. However, you can cite the test that you took (provide author, date, title, and source in the reference list and author and date in the text)—this is what I advise you to do.
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Typepad HTML Email It’s not in the manual but is part of general writing advice. Use “such as” to introduce examples. Use “like” for comparisons of things that are similar. So in your example, I would use “such as resource constrains and political pressures.”
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Typepad HTML Email You are right to put the edition next to the page numbers, but they go in the same set of parentheses: (7th ed., pp. 25-47). Also put the title of the chapter and the book in sentence case (Leadership theory and application for nurse leaders), and you do not need the retrieval date—instead give the publisher information. Then you’re good to go!
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Typepad HTML Email The primary source is the source in which the information was first reported or published. A secondary source reports information secondhand. When you write “The State of Obesity 2018 report (as cited in Molina, 2018),” you are citing the Obesity report as a secondary source; you didn’t read the Obesity report, you read Molina. Your formatting if you read Molina is correct. Does that help?
Toggle Commented Sep 18, 2018 on The Myth of the Off-Limits Source at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email In this case, the Obesity Report is a secondary source, because the data as reported in Molina were already published somewhere (in the report). So use the “as cited in” version of the citation.
Toggle Commented Sep 17, 2018 on The Myth of the Off-Limits Source at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The newspaper article is a primary source because the quotation is being published in that article for the first time. However, because the speaker in the quotation is not the same as the author of the article, you have to work the name of the speaker into the sentence and then insert the citation---your second example is correct.
Toggle Commented Sep 17, 2018 on The Myth of the Off-Limits Source at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The ampersand is not included because the ellipsis makes it redundant. Including both an ellipsis and an ampersand is not necessary; hence, only the ellipsis is used.
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Typepad HTML Email Have my many blessings! The clarity of the writing is the most important thing. If you’re going cross-eyed, that’s not good for clarity. I advise that you use “U.S.” as the form.
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2018 on An Abbreviations FAQ at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The citation I sent comes from the authors of the test and can be found on their website. It needed some formatting for proper APA Style, but otherwise, we advise that you use a suggested citation wherever possible. That’s why my citation looked the way it did---although I appreciate your thoughtfulness.
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2018 on How to Cite Part of a Work at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email I believe that Merriam-Webster’s has changed how they refer to their own dictionary over the years. You should cite the title as shown on the work, which for this dictionary is the Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary. You can see the official name in their FAQ (see the question “Which dictionary is used”): https://www.merriam-webster.com/about-us/faq
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Typepad HTML Email You should cite the author, date, title, and source of the test itself. Browne, C., Culligan, B., & Phillips, J. (2013). The New General Service List. Retrieved from http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org In text: (Browne, Culligan, & Phillips, 2013) Hope that helps!
Toggle Commented Sep 6, 2018 on How to Cite Part of a Work at APA Style Blog
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by Chelsea Lee Dear Style Expert, How do I format quotations from books or articles written in a foreign language? Do I have to present the quotation in both the original language and in translation, or do I present only... Continue reading
Posted Sep 3, 2018 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email APA does not have specific rules for this, other than to use numerals (which you did). I recommend using the same formats you see in the literature you are citing, so that you are consistent. The formats you included in your example sentence are fine.
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