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Cornflower
Edinburgh
Interests: books, music, food, flowers ...
Recent Activity
Yes; I enjoyed it very much.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Thought for the day at Cornflower Books
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A few for the house before the garden took a battering today. Gentle Hermione, The Generous Gardener, Gertrude Jekyll, Munstead Wood, and The Wedgwood Rose, all from David Austin. Continue reading
Posted Jun 24, 2019 at Cornflower
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A book brush. I got mine at The Royal Highland Show, but they are available online here, here, and here, for instance. Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2019 at Cornflower Books
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A large, cosy shawl for cold days finished just as the weather warms up. This is Vedbaek by Karie Westermann (the second one I've made). I used lovely Blacker Swan DK in 'Stone', but ran out on the border so... Continue reading
Posted Jun 19, 2019 at Cornflower
Enjoying it greatly, Liz.
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2019 on Off to a good start at Cornflower Books
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You're right, Ann, it would be very diverting for hospital waiting and the like.
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2019 on Off to a good start at Cornflower Books
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I so agree about re-reading - the comfort of the familiar, or fresh discoveries within old favourites. As to the patience bit, certainly up to the point I've got to in the book (about 100 pages) Lucy's childhood sounds lovely, so she may just be exaggerating for effect!
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2019 on Thought for the day at Cornflower Books
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That must have been very interesting, Susan - he had quite a few fearful moments in the course of his travels underground.
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2019 on Underland at Cornflower Books
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That should be good, Claire.
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2019 on Underland at Cornflower Books
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Ah, The Third Man!
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2019 on Underland at Cornflower Books
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"Adults tend to forget - or perhaps never appreciated in the first place if lifelong non-readers themselves - what a vital part of the process rereading is for children. As adults, rereading seems like backtracking at best, self-indulgence at worst. Free time is such a scarce resource that we feel we should be using it only on new things. But for children, rereading is absolutely necessary. The act of reading is itself still new. A lot of energy is still going into (not so) simple decoding of words and the assimilation of meaning. Only then do you get to enjoy... Continue reading
Posted Jun 19, 2019 at Cornflower Books
It must be said that RM does not take the 'tourist route' beneath Paris!
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2019 on Underland at Cornflower Books
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You're welcome, Erika, and thank you for your recommendation - we can always do with a funny book!
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2019 on Off to a good start at Cornflower Books
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Very wise, Toffeeapple. I wondered often why RM and the people he met (e.g. the potholers, and the 'crowds' who apparently frequent subterranean Paris) subject themselves to those experiences when they didn't have to - there were uncomfortable moments for this reader, but anyone more acutely sensitive to fears of that kind would do well to steer clear.
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2019 on Underland at Cornflower Books
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He does go down the Boulby mine. I don't think he mentions the lab by name, but he does cover what they do there - very interesting!
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2019 on Underland at Cornflower Books
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Disturbing, eye-opening, puzzling, Underland is not a comfortable book, and one wonders what possessed Robert Macfarlane to go to the lengths he did in order to write it. Sub-titled A Deep Time Journey, it's an exploration and examination of what lies beneath our feet seen through a variety of lenses: historical, political, geological, ecological, geographical, and cultural. It's personal, too, as Macfarlane records his own impressions and experiences of the landscapes he visits in order to map so-called 'deep time'. Parts of it are fascinating, others less gripping, but it does open the subterrane in unexpected ways and in so... Continue reading
Posted Jun 17, 2019 at Cornflower Books
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"Was your first crush on Dickon instead of Johnny Depp? Do you still get the urge to tap the back of a wardrobe if you find yourself alone in a strange bedroom, or keep half an ear out at midnight for the sound of Hatty in the garden? If so, this is the book for you. But then, most books are. You are, like me, a bookworm." From Bookworm: A Memoir of Childhood Reading by Lucy Mangan. Continue reading
Posted Jun 16, 2019 at Cornflower Books
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News just in from the Borders Book Festival: this year's Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction has been awarded to Robin Robertson for The Long Take, written in both verse and prose and set in America after the Second World War. The judges said - “The Long Take recounts the inner journey of Canadian veteran Joe Walker as he travels from New York to Los Angeles and San Francisco attempting to rebuild his life after living through the horrors of war in Europe. In poetry of the utmost beauty, Robin Robertson interweaves themes from the great age of black and... Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2019 at Cornflower Books
The Wainwright Prize for nature writing is one I'm always interested in looking at; it is awarded annually "to the book which most successfully reflects the ethos of renowned nature writer Alfred Wainwright’s work, to inspire readers to explore the outdoors and to nurture a respect for the natural world". The longlist has been announced today, World Environment Day, and is shown above. I've read Kate Humble's Thinking On My Feet (there's a post on it here), and am currently reading Robert Macfarlane's Underland and finding it surprising and fascinating, but I know the others by name only. Nothing to... Continue reading
Posted Jun 5, 2019 at Cornflower Books
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... The Dutch House by Ann Patchett, to be published on 24th. September. "Danny Conroy grows up in the Dutch House, a lavish folly in small-town Pennsylvania taken on by his property developer father. Though his father is distant and his mother is absent, Danny has his beloved sister Maeve: Maeve with her wall of black hair, her delicacy, her brilliance. Life is comfortable and coherent, played out under the watchful eyes of the house's former owners in the frames of their oil paintings, or under the cover of the draperies around the window seat in Maeve's room. Then one... Continue reading
Posted Jun 2, 2019 at Cornflower Books
That's marvellous, Nora, thank you so much!
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2019 on Beyond the Thirty-Nine Steps at Cornflower Books
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Thank you, Helen!
Toggle Commented May 31, 2019 on Leather on willow at Cornflower Books
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Here's the list minus the 2 above: The Cricket Match by Hugh de Sélincourt (1924) England, their England by AG Macdonell (1933) Playing the Game by Ian Buruma (1991) The Match by Romesh Gunesekera (2006) 24 for 3 by Jennie Walker (2007) Netherland by Joseph O'Neill (20080 Chinaman by Shehan Karunatilaka (2011) Selection Day by Aravind Adiga (2016) I must read the Sayers!
Toggle Commented May 31, 2019 on Leather on willow at Cornflower Books
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An article in today's Times lists the 10 best novels about cricket (the cricket world cup has started, in case you weren't aware). I happen to have read two of the books and warmly recommend them - whether you're interested in cricket or not - as their scope goes well beyond the game: Half of the Human Race by Anthony Quinn has a post here, while my thoughts on A Possible Life by Sebastian Faulks, originally published elsewhere, are below. "A novel in five stories, each one linked to its fellows in ways which are subtle and surprising, seemingly coincidental... Continue reading
Posted May 30, 2019 at Cornflower Books
I loved that one, Erika!
Toggle Commented May 29, 2019 on Sunday reads at Cornflower Books
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