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Corvus
Portland, OR
Interests: video games, cinema, literature
Recent Activity
You rang? I've turned lurking into such an art form, I'm surprised people still remember I exist. ;) I remember when commenting on your blog meant typing in my name, email, and an optional URL. Now I had to pick a service to sign in with, decide if the permissions leak was worthy enough (for you Chris, always), try and navigate through an ad page once I signed in, install a browser ad-on advertised on the advertisement, and voila - here I am with permission to comment. /srednaw yawa gniltrohc
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2014 on The Meta-Campaign at Only a Game
1 reply
You see, my actual complaint (and I was playing on normal) is that the malaria and the guard posts are inconsistent with finding a convoy endlessly circling a stretch of road. And it was that inconsistency that I found distracting, not the difficulty. And I don't consider the skin tone of your avatar's harassers to be meaningful from a gameplay standpoint. It's a strong world-texturing details, but it doesn't exactly effect gameplay. And I want to clarify that I'm not saying that FC2 is a bad game. I did somewhat enjoy it as I played, I just didn't feel compelled to keep playing. And this was due mostly to the inconsistency in the messages the game dynamics themselves were communicating to me.
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2009 on Cold jungle at Brainy Gamer
1 reply
So I needed to be playing on higher than "normal" difficulty in order to truly enjoy and understand the game? For that matter, why would I even need to be playing it on normal to fully appreciate what the game had to offer? Don't get me started on how asinine I think that mentality is.
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2009 on Cold jungle at Brainy Gamer
1 reply
Keeping in mind that the part of the storytelling process I most focus on is the audience experience portion, my concern is not that there was no story provided, but that the tools given to me to build a story were hopelessly inconsistent. For example, I accepted a mission to stop an armored convoy of weapons before it reached its destination. Not only was there no time limit on this mission, but when I found the convoy, it was circling a set course over and over with no destination. Even after I took out all but the last truck, it circled the same course without deviation. If you're going to leave it in my hands to feel a part of this inexorable path of violence where no single person's input makes a significant difference... don't make it so obvious that the world is set up to ensure I succeed at everything I do.
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2009 on Cold jungle at Brainy Gamer
1 reply
I'm in the same boat as you, Michael. I found much of what it was trying to accomplish to be very interesting, but ultimately feel it required me to overlook too much in order to recognize the accomplishments. First of all, we're given in depth bios for each possible avatar... which appear to have very little influence on how the game is played, or the world perceived. I found this led to a greater disconnect than if I'd just been tossed into a generic body. Further, the game's dynamic were pulling in two directions. On the one hand, they were designed to immerse you in the storyworld. On the other hand, they were designed to let you know you were playing a game. The gap between these two very different approach led to a discordant experience for me. Color-coded road signs are awesome, but why couldn't I take advantage of that mechanic by setting my own goals on the map? Having a wrist watch to time my naps was a nice touch, but why did the missions described as time-sensitive not require me to also check my wristwatch? So many little inconsistencies of presentation, coupled with the lack of meaningful character choices, led me to feel what I really ought to be doing was fleeing the area and finding an airport in the next country over.
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2009 on Cold jungle at Brainy Gamer
1 reply
Wow. Nice to know that people like Jim are out there, spreading the word. Thanks for "introducing" him to me, Michael. I hope to properly meet him one of these days.
Toggle Commented Mar 2, 2009 on Gee whiz at Brainy Gamer
1 reply
May all involved break the appropriate limbs! I'm eager to see what you have to say about theater and playing video games, as I've been contemplating a post about why we don't use a more theatrical approach to analyzing video games.
Toggle Commented Feb 25, 2009 on Opening night at Brainy Gamer
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Yeah, I don't know that lesser and greater are the most appropriate terms to use in this conversation either (although I doubt many will stop using them). 'Different' would be more accurate. And... the rest of what I was about to write just demanded to be included in today's post. I'll trackback!
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2009 on Brainy Gamer Podcast - Episode 20 at Brainy Gamer
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Something like the Godfather game did, casting the player as someone ancillary to the plot of the movie. It'd be nice to see that much attention paid to the inclusion of new narrative elements. What I'd like to see with DLC of this nature--where it changes how your character relates to the world with new moves, increased challenge, etc--is to have it change the personality and relationships of the primary characters. Echoes of Moorcock's eternal champion perhaps. Each very similar, yet distinct in attitude and approach.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2009 on Brainy Gamer Podcast - Episode 20 at Brainy Gamer
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Thanks for having us all on, Michael!
1 reply