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Dana Huff
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I voted, too! I teared up in line looking at the different kinds of people in line -- people I haven't always seen in line when I have voted before. I teared up when I saw the 18-year-old voting in his first election -- he was wearing a flag tie. I full on cried when I called my husband to tell him I had voted. I feel the same way you do -- hopeful instead of resigned.
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2008 on one lever, pulled. at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I voted, too! I teared up in line looking at the different kinds of people in line -- people I haven't always seen in line when I have voted before. I teared up when I saw the 18-year-old voting in his first election -- he was wearing a flag tie. I full on cried when I called my husband to tell him I had voted. I feel the same way you do -- hopeful instead of resigned.
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2008 on one lever, pulled. at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Wil, as everyone else has said, this was beautifully written, so poignant, and you set the scene so well. I think I have a theory as to why your parents didn't stand up for you. Think of it like this -- in our parents' generation (I'm about your age, and your parents are most likely older than mine, who had me when they were 20), the teacher was always right. Parents supported the teacher no matter what. I think everyone has a painful teacher memory like this one somewhere, and I am acutely aware of "the butterfly effect" as a teacher myself. Parents today, well, you can't count on them to support the teacher. If that teacher did that today, I am sure that if your own parents didn't speak up, the other parents would have. There are good and bad sides to this because sometimes the teacher shouldn't be backed up -- as was the case in your situation -- whereas sometimes they should be, and they aren't. I felt this right along with you, though. Thanks for writing it.
Toggle Commented May 1, 2007 on the butterfly tree at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Wil, as everyone else has said, this was beautifully written, so poignant, and you set the scene so well. I think I have a theory as to why your parents didn't stand up for you. Think of it like this -- in our parents' generation (I'm about your age, and your parents are most likely older than mine, who had me when they were 20), the teacher was always right. Parents supported the teacher no matter what. I think everyone has a painful teacher memory like this one somewhere, and I am acutely aware of "the butterfly effect" as a teacher myself. Parents today, well, you can't count on them to support the teacher. If that teacher did that today, I am sure that if your own parents didn't speak up, the other parents would have. There are good and bad sides to this because sometimes the teacher shouldn't be backed up -- as was the case in your situation -- whereas sometimes they should be, and they aren't. I felt this right along with you, though. Thanks for writing it.
Toggle Commented May 1, 2007 on the butterfly tree at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Wil, I'm Christian, like so many other commenters here, and I despise some of the things I see people do in the name of Jesus. I have been teaching at a Jewish high school for three years, and a central tenet of my students' eduction is the concept of "tikkun olam," or "repairing the world." The world is "broken" and it's our obligation to fix it by helping each other. We do community service projects together. I have seen a lot more compassion from my students -- a lot more imitation of "what Jesus would do" from these kids -- than I've ever seen from the majority of Christians I've known. Makes you think, especially when the Christian Coalition doesn't see helping others in need as part of their mission. I wonder what we could accomplish in the world if Christians truly tried to emulate Jesus instead of focusing so much on what people do with their crotches.
Toggle Commented Nov 30, 2006 on Seriously. What would Jesus do? at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Wil, I'm Christian, like so many other commenters here, and I despise some of the things I see people do in the name of Jesus. I have been teaching at a Jewish high school for three years, and a central tenet of my students' eduction is the concept of "tikkun olam," or "repairing the world." The world is "broken" and it's our obligation to fix it by helping each other. We do community service projects together. I have seen a lot more compassion from my students -- a lot more imitation of "what Jesus would do" from these kids -- than I've ever seen from the majority of Christians I've known. Makes you think, especially when the Christian Coalition doesn't see helping others in need as part of their mission. I wonder what we could accomplish in the world if Christians truly tried to emulate Jesus instead of focusing so much on what people do with their crotches.
Toggle Commented Nov 30, 2006 on Seriously. What would Jesus do? at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
It's amazing, the bizarre sense of entitlement people have. I wouldn't feel comfortable making the kind of request you described, and it amazes me the things people will ask. I am in no way famous, but I have an education blog that a few people read. I got a request from an Italian girl who wanted me to be her pen pal so she could practice English -- completely out of the blue -- just because I teach English. I just don't have that kind of time. I have a full time job and three kids! Somebody who designed an education website has been bugging me for a review of it. Again, time. I don't mind helping people get a leg up, but I don't know how I got on the "I will sacrifice all of my free time to help you do whatever" list. My husband is starting to get some weird requests/e-mails, etc., too -- his blog is much more popular. It's weird. You just want to step back and ask what planet these people live on that they feel they can impose upon your time and resources.
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2006 on yep. I'm the asshole. at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
It's amazing, the bizarre sense of entitlement people have. I wouldn't feel comfortable making the kind of request you described, and it amazes me the things people will ask. I am in no way famous, but I have an education blog that a few people read. I got a request from an Italian girl who wanted me to be her pen pal so she could practice English -- completely out of the blue -- just because I teach English. I just don't have that kind of time. I have a full time job and three kids! Somebody who designed an education website has been bugging me for a review of it. Again, time. I don't mind helping people get a leg up, but I don't know how I got on the "I will sacrifice all of my free time to help you do whatever" list. My husband is starting to get some weird requests/e-mails, etc., too -- his blog is much more popular. It's weird. You just want to step back and ask what planet these people live on that they feel they can impose upon your time and resources.
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2006 on yep. I'm the asshole. at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I don't have any experience with Word Press, although I hear it has lots of former MT converts. I really like 3.2. Spam Lookup, bundled with the software, works great. I have NO spam that hasn't been caught by the filter. I also have some other cool plugins built for 3.2. If your friend is willing to help, it should be OK. Before I finished reading your post, I was going to suggest that one of your readers would be more than happy to help you at no charge, I'll bet. Are you able to import your old blog if you set up a new installation of MT 3.2? I moved all my stuff to a new domain, and exporting and importing was a piece of cake -- except I had to republish all my comments and trackbacks, and considering how many you get, that could be onerous.
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2005 on nearing the rubicon at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I don't have any experience with Word Press, although I hear it has lots of former MT converts. I really like 3.2. Spam Lookup, bundled with the software, works great. I have NO spam that hasn't been caught by the filter. I also have some other cool plugins built for 3.2. If your friend is willing to help, it should be OK. Before I finished reading your post, I was going to suggest that one of your readers would be more than happy to help you at no charge, I'll bet. Are you able to import your old blog if you set up a new installation of MT 3.2? I moved all my stuff to a new domain, and exporting and importing was a piece of cake -- except I had to republish all my comments and trackbacks, and considering how many you get, that could be onerous.
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2005 on nearing the rubicon at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply