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David Einstein
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@anthropocene I'm not sure where you are looking at Buoys 4 and 6, but buoys 100004 and 100006 stopped updating on the http://iabp.apl.washington.edu/maps_daily.html page sometime around the end of June (June 26 IIRC) I think that these are the only buoyus on that page where the data stopped. Buoy 100006 is in a cluster of buoys and the other buoys in that cluster are still moving (slowly, but detectably.) This leads me to believe that there is a glitch in the data connection. I also believe that these are identical buoys to OBuoys #4 and #6 http://obuoy.datatransport.org/monitor#overview/gpstracks . I further conjecture that the data stopped changing on the iabp page where the breaks in the tracks of the buoys occurred (this is difficult to verify directly, as the raw data does not seem to be accessible on the Obuoy page.
I have a question. In order to get an idea of the movement of the central Arctic ice I have been attempting to follow buoy 100004 on the Daily Nares Strait map. http://iabp.apl.washington.edu/maps_daily_naresstrait.html . Neither the position nor the track seems to have changed at all since late June. The daily table http://iabp.apl.washington.edu/maps_daily_table.html lists buoy 100004 as being Obuoy4, and the tracks of 100004 and Obuoy4 http://obuoy.datatransport.org/monitor#overview/gpstracks seem similar up to the point that Obuoy4 teleports and 100004 stops. Are these actually the same buoy? How reliable are the rest of the tracks on the iapb site? Can we accurately judge the flow near the Nares Strait with these buoys?
MASIE is also counting a lot of ice that the others are ignoring. Paul Klemenik thinks that this is atributable to a delay in reporting so that MASIE is five days or so behind the day that it claims to be reporting. This may be so, byt MaASIE also seems to be reporting a lot of "slush" that the others miss. The difference between MASIE and the others is probably easiest seen in the East Siberian Sea. Compare the MASIE data ftp://sidads.colorado.edu/DATASETS/NOAA/G02186/png/masie_all_r03_v01_2012224_4km.png with today's Modis Lance Terra snapshot of the same region http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/imagery/subsets/?subset=Arctic_r05c04.2012225.terra (a beautiful image IMO) and you will see that MASIE is counting regions of swirling slush that CT, Bremen, or NSIDC are not counting.
Toggle Commented Aug 13, 2012 on ASI 2012 update 9: stormy weather at Arctic Sea Ice
@Rob I believer that the large glacier you refer to is the Humboldt Glacier http://glacierchange.wordpress.com/2010/09/04/humboldt-glacier-retreat-greenland/
Toggle Commented Jul 17, 2012 on Petermann calves again at Arctic Sea Ice
The first solo trip through the NW passage was in 1977 by Willy de Roos (AFAIK). This trip is non-stop in a fiberglass boat which takes a certain amount of um, testicular fortitude (and a definite lack of ice.)
Toggle Commented Aug 27, 2011 on Oh, and BTW, the Passages are open at Arctic Sea Ice
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Aug 27, 2011