This is Douglas Lain's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Douglas Lain's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Douglas Lain
Recent Activity
Isn't jouissance the pleasure that splits the subject, a pleasure beyond pleasure that has to be resolved or sublated before it can be enjoyed?
Toggle Commented Aug 10, 2015 on Trump: candidate of truth at I cite
I too oppose a reboot. When I said Capitalism needs one in order to work again I meant that in order for profit making to resume Capitalism needs to collapse. Capital needs to be destroyed in order for Capitalism to survive. The question of austerity or default is just a question of how we are to manage this destruction.
Two things: A default and the collapse of the Euro and European banks will hurt working people probably just as much as austerity. The Capitalist system requires a massive collapse in order to get back on its feet and start working again. There is a need for a reboot. Revolutionaries, anti-capitalists, and most certainly communists should not fall for the trap of asking whether austerity or default is more humane, or which one we prefer. We should be asking what we should be pushing for in order to establish a new system, in order to create the will to break from the current game. So, yes, fight austerity, but at the same time be ready for what default will mean and don't think that the system's crisis is automatically your gain.
Zizek also speaks of impossible demands that are only made with the tacit understanding that the demands will not be met. It is difficult to know precisely what kind of demand this is exactly.
Toggle Commented Oct 28, 2011 on We demand: Jobs for All #occupywallstreet at I cite
http://www.marxisthumanistinitiative.org/tag/falling-rate-of-profit
"In other words, over the course of the last century, net business investment atrophied while G.D.P. per capita increased spectacularly." This is actually untrue according to empirical evidence presented by Kliman. This standard account leads us to conclude we can regulate Capitalism and that perverse greed is at the root of the crisis. Instead the evidence demonstrates that profits have been declining since the 70s right alongside the decline in production and reinvestment.
This emphasis on the 1% may be a misstep and empirically invalid. What is counted as income here? How does this income relate to corporate profits or GNP? Check out what Andrew Kliman has to say about the current crisis, wages, and neoliberalism. http://www.marxisthumanistinitiative.org/cc2010/andrew-kliman
What Sean says in his last paragraph is key. This movement has to grow and it has to find its target. Frankly, nobody knows quite what the target is yet, not Jodi Dean, not Slavoj ZIzek, and not me. In Egypt the movement could grow quickly because the target was clear. Everyone wanted to get rid of Mubarak, but in the US the working classes aren't sure who they want to get rid of and yes this is because of the lingering sense that we live in a "democracy," but it is just this that might give us a chance to do more than get rid of a dictator.
Is it not true that many of the most ruthless Capitalists in Russia today are former Communist Party leaders in what was the Soviet Union?
Seems like the only way to steer this in a radical direction is by saying "we" and working with other radicals to influence where this goes next.
I actually quite like the idea of a people's mike as a tactic as well, and when I was involved in organizing protests against the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq I pressed to open up the protest space to allow countering views to be expressed. What I'd been thinking of was the way people jumped up on a police car outside of Sproul hall in 1964 as they debated how to handle the administration's oppression of speech. These open public debates as a part of actions, occupations, and demonstrations are important for precisely the reasons you mention. Back in 1964 the FSM was born out of such open moments, but the FSM's goal was not to create a people's microphone but rather to change the policies at UC Berkeley. The trouble with the OCCUPYWALLSTREET movement isn't necessarily tactical but strategic. Sticking with the FSM for a moment, the events at Sproul hall, the police car sit in, these things were organized and thought through in advance by what I'll call Savio's gang. Same holds for Rosa Parks and her gang. Mass demonstrations of democracy in the street seem to rely on vanguard organizing.
Toggle Commented Sep 18, 2011 on Occupy Wall Street at I cite
The Occupy Wall Street movement strikes me as a way to do appear to offer dissent but with the assurance that nothing will change. It's a repeat of tactics from Spain that have already been shown to have failed. I hope to be proven wrong, of course. http://douglaslain.net/?p=842
Toggle Commented Sep 18, 2011 on Occupy Wall Street at I cite
Douglas Lain is now following The Typepad Team
Sep 17, 2011