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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
Community nurse once upon a time, now Shire-dweller & Dartmoor wanderer usually with book in hand or quilt in mind...
Interests: reading, quilting, books, walking, gardening,
Recent Activity
You’d love the audio Fran! The minute I switch it on I’m back there and straight into the plot again. Have to agree about the films, very exhausting.
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So many lovely comments sharing these moments Ann and how the book was given as a special gift. The follow-up with chocolates just genius and I’m guessing the books probably even more special now x
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Oh yes, pull them off the shelf and disappear in Ceci. I think our children absorbed the love and association from my dad. One went to to New Zealand and brought him back a lovely book from the film set which I’ve just found. He’d written a lovely tribute to his grandad inside thanking him for all the LOTR love.
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Jerri, you will know exactly why I am so enchanted by it all that the moment if you have also loved the Rob Inglis version, he really is so good. What a wonderful lifetime of LOTR enjoyment you have had.
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And wasn’t he brilliant!
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And how special the gift becomes, no matter what it is, if the giver is of that ilk Penny. Loving the hobbit up the tree moment!
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I’m trying to remember how it crept into my consciousness now you mention. It Jan. I don’t think it was doing the rounds at school in the 1960s, we were too engrossed in Anya Seton’s Katherine and borrowing the single copy of Gone With the Wind that was being borrowed around the class.
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I’m good with audio books if I’m sewing, somehow it slots into the flow and I disappear into it. I well remember it being part of the 1960’s cult reading too. I had the big single volume paperback but never quite managed it.
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Wonderful time to read it Erika and yes to all the mythologies. And nowadays it’s clear that Game of Thrones has pillaged quite a few of the tropes and so it goes on.
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John that is the set that my dad listened to and loved. I remember him lending it to us once with great trepidation for fear we let it unravel in the machine or something. In the end I think I was too worried it might to play it. It was definitely his ‘Precious’!.
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I think my dad took great comfort from it too Lydia and I can imagine it making very sustaining listening through sleepless nights. So pleased you emerged on the other side and made it x
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In really looking forward to Horizon Jude and also to investigating Cook’s sojourn in Plymouth before he set sail. There are plaques various that I’ve seen in passing and which I need to go back and explore. The city museum has been closed for two years for a revamp so I’m looking forward to it opening again and discovering more. How wonderful to have read LOTR at eleven, what a magical age to absorb it and keep it there.
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Sula I find so often that books work better in audio than read and I think this might be one of them. Someone else demystifying the pronunciations and creating something very lyrical which must surely have been Tolkien’s original intention. Rob Inglis sings the songs too; not an effect that my reading could ever reproduce.
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Val, I’ve been touting them as perfect long journey listening here too. We’d be in Orkney in no time and imagine your mind filled with all that myth and magic as you arrive.
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Trish, I’ll admit to dozing off during the battle scenes in the films.i blame the Vue Cinema and those VIP armchairs!
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I've been on some amazing journeys to far off places (from my armchair) so far this year. Underland (with Robert Macfarlane), Doggerland (Time Song by Julia Blackburn), Antarctica (Erebus by Michael Palin) and I'm currently in the middle of a... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I've been reading, in step with the year, The Wood by John Lewis-Stempel. I love his writing, his observations and above all, as a farmer, his pragmatism about life in the countryside. It's an outlook that chimes with mine. much... Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Such a good book Lesley though I'm thinking how to write about it without spoiling it...because that moment at the end with the photograph with the writing on almost undid me. My perspective changed instantly.
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Oh yes of course, Daphne!
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I've found it! A link to the list for Lesley Ann which was 2014 https://tinyurl.com/y3sjb63j
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I absolutely loved Howards End when I finally read it and I will now go off and find Lesley-Ann's list if I can...
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You have twelve years to catch up on Tasker but I'm really pleased you have found us and you are most welcome here.
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Erika you are too kind, I'm blushing but thank you x
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Lucy what a remarkable story and how lovely to hear that Kate now has a family of her own. I can only begin to imagine that journey for you all. I wish I knew where Miss Noblett was now,sadly I have no contact details but perhaps someone will see this and get in touch here.
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Pam I am so sorry, I missed this comment when you posted it and so I'm grateful to Lucy for her next comment today which has flagged this post up again. How sorry I am too hear about Christopher but not surprised to know that Miss Noblett was still there for you and I do hope you get this reply.
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