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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
Community nurse once upon a time, now Shire-dweller & Dartmoor wanderer usually with book in hand or quilt in mind...
Interests: reading, quilting, books, walking, gardening,
Recent Activity
I did Erike, it was a bit tongue in cheek about Simon Armitage’s scribbled signature...yes a signed copy 😊
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'It was impossible...to tell London's story; it was too large, too ancient, too many layers obscured, its stories were too contradictory, the the poor lives, in the journalistic phrase, cheek by jowl with the wealthy was a shallow simplification -... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
I think it’s the elephant in the room that no one has mentioned...we all expected it to happen on Carol Ann Duffy’s watch, but surely it will happen during Simon Armitage’s tenure. Whilst no pressure to write for the occasion I can’t believe he’d miss out on it all...funerals and coronations etc. Huge events both.
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June 1st all being well
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I studied The World’s Wife in depth for that radio programme...weeks and weeks and of course barely touched the surface in the radio programme, but it all stayed with me. I have just ordered the poems about the First World War and remember the programme well. I plan to be an Armitage completist over the next few years. Currently dipping into The Unaccompanied, so many good poems to savour.
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I agree with you, so deserving based on time served already in the interests of poetry. And thank you for the heads up about Sir Gawain, I’m loving it.
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Having had a delightful ten years steeped in poetry and thanks in some part to Carol Ann Duffy, our last Poet Laureate, I am hopping around with delight at the selection of Simon Armitage as our next one. I’ve made... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Yes, on Instagram as dovegreyreader. If you click on the images on the top left sidebar it should take you there.
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Dear Bee, if you could know how many messages I get from distressed Camber Top makers stuck on the overlap and pivot, and I’m powerless to assist because I can’t for the life of me remember how I did it. All I know is it suddenly clicked so keep reading the instructions. I was actually so sure I’d never manage it again that I sold all my M&M patterns on EBay a while back. Wishing you much good luck with it.
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Perfect for a Greek Island, and if it’s idyllic then Eutopia of course...sorry, couldn’t not😊
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Erika, I am always in awe of your childhood experiences and love it when you share them. Now I’m envisaging a grumpy eleven year old put back in the infants class and smiling. I’d have been grumpy too!
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Oh goodness Iris, what a shock to the system that must have been. But at least you had reading and doubtless some wonderful books to be read.
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Isn’t Rebecca Goss a wonderful discovery. I’m still working my way through the poems and repeating the first volume too. I’m still pole-axed by The English Patient and its impact this time around. My next reread is going to be The Remains of the Day (actually I’m listening to it) same era and I suspect the same nuances passed me by.
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Yes, plenty of patience and time to allow yourself to slip into the swing of things. My Reading Friend, the one who I was quite sure was going to throttle me for recommending it, said she was into it very quickly, that it soon felt normal and that it is now a book she would never part with.
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It is Penny, I can actually remember the class room, where in the room I was sitting and the book (about a blacksmith).
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Oh yes, and I should have mentioned that because I too could completely understand Cecilia’s reaction. I have had one or two email exchanges with them about the brow-beating to no avail and also mentioned it when I rang recently. The current biannually uses a hefty chunk from a blog post here (about the first volume of short stories) to promote the second volume of short stories, and call me old fashioned but I felt it would have been nice to have been asked...
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Unfortunately not made by me! I saw it at an exhibition and tried hard to find the pattern. The nearest I found was one in an old magazine but no hope of getting a copy. Isn’t it stunning.
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Jane I am still marvelling at how on earth Alice Jolly wrote it, and sustained the voice throughout. I’m really hoping she does some literary events here in the south west this year as I’d love to hear her talk about it, and I have so many questions I’d have to hog the microphone at the end😂 As you say very compelling, I couldn’t put it down and set everything else aside.
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I’m not sure what is happening with the BL archiving now Kate, I must check. How good to know that your MA is there and stored for ever. I certainly enjoyed reading the extract you sent me and Muriel Rose has fascinated me ever since.
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Hope you like it Fran, no sign of it in our library last time I checked. Oh...I take it back, just looked and they have a copy now, just one for the whole county!
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I recommended it to my Reading Friend who is sometimes a little averse to versification in fiction. We meet every six weeks or so and don’t discuss the books in between so when we met yesterday I was slightly terrified that she might have loathed it. Her verdict was that is was her best read of the century so far...she absolutely adored it. We spent about 30mins of our allotted two hours talking about it and wondering quite how it was left off the Women’s Prize list. It’s a classic of our times I think.
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So pleased you enjoyed it Bet, and like you I really had to concentrate...and I wanted to because for the duration of the book it was as if I was there, living then.
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Imbecile - A stupid person. Mid 16th century (as an adjective in the sense ‘physically weak’): via French from Latin imbecillus, literally ‘without a supporting staff’, from in- (expressing negation) + baculum ‘stick, staff’. The current sense dates from the... Continue reading
Posted May 17, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Twenty-seven years since it won the Booker Prize in 1992 (maybe check my maths as usual) twenty-two years since I read The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje in 1997, a lot happened that year, more or less in this order... Continue reading
Posted May 13, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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The Certificates Mothers were not given space to write their occupations on UK birth certificates until 1984. Source : General Register Office The registrar takes his pen, tips its freight of permanent ink to write Poet in the space that... Continue reading
Posted May 10, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles