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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
Community nurse once upon a time, now Shire-dweller & Dartmoor wanderer usually with book in hand or quilt in mind...
Interests: reading, quilting, books, walking, gardening,
Recent Activity
Ours loved Green Knowe and we had all the books. It was made into a TV series which had us hooked and you can buy the DVD from Diana’s shop at Hemingford Grey. Very easy to stand at the windows and imagine the snow. The house is very much still the house of the book.
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Luminaries at dovegreyreader scribbles
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It seemed to appear out of nowhere, because I'm not really sure I knew it was even being filmed, but the six-part series of The Luminaries is coming to BBC One very soon. It was all enough to make me... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Treasures all of them but I can find no record of who might have done that print on the cover of Adrian Bell’s book
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Kate I had been meaning to email you to ask because I felt sure you would know much more about Robin Tanner. And as soon as Muriel Rose was mentioned I knew your would! I found the piece you sent me and also it is now possible to read the very rare book about Muriel that you lent me online. Wonderful connections.
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Wiltshire Village had been sitting on Carol’s shelves for some time plus she had seen a film about them (I think) and it seemed like a good suggestion. I too love the way these things start. We had no idea of the trails it would reveal. Phyllis Barron left all the blocks and their entire textile archive to Robin Tanner when she died (Dorothy had died earlier) and it eventually made its way to the collection in Farnham. Yes Robin was definitely influenced by Samuel Palmer as were several others at Goldsmiths with him at the time. Even researching those he studied with has proved fascinating...Graham Sutherland amongst them. I’ve just finished handiwork and loved it too. An intensely thoughtful book about creativity and grief, and that wonderful thing Flow.
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Early on in ‘proceedings’ I and two of my group of friends, who meet several times a year from around the country, decided that in the absence of our traditional summer gathering perhaps we would read a book together. The... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I’m spending a surprising amount of time at the desk, musing and scribbling and checking books and reading. It’s proved to be a really lovely bright place to sit. Today a batch of photos arrived from FreePrint ...you can order about 40 a month and only pay postage so I’ve been sticking them into my diary. Thank you for the podcast recommends. I’ve listened to some of Melissa Harrison’s but don’t know Katie Green so I’ll check her out. Katherine May’s books is ringing bells...did I hear her speak at a literary festival somewhere?? Thank you for the reminder about the book it’s had excellent reviews.
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I would second, third and fourth your suggestions of Kathleen Jamie’s books Angela. All so involving and thoughtful. They have a special place in my special shelf...books I couldn’t live without and they bear endless reading. Books that truly do keep on giving.
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I’ve heard of that. I’m thinking we must have ventured that way when we lived in Surrey. I think a visit to Selborne must be in the cards and Jane Austen’s Chawton just along the way.
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It’s a beautiful book and is causing me to think quite differently. I assumed they knew very little about the natural world and it’s clear GW is feeling his way with a lot of the mysteries...but then I thought about us and the barn owls and how a year of watching them really carefully has taught us all the things that he observed too. It’s all in the watching carefully and Gilbert was an expert. In some respects little has changed in the things he noticed.
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That’s going straight in my diary this minute. I can only begin to imagine how hard London living must have been these last few weeks but looks like they’ve cracked it for now. Well done London.
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Is the ‘Imogen moment’ me and pronouncing it with a hard ‘g’ after reading What Katy Did, and never realising my mistake until I looked after an Imogen at GOSH.
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That’s perfect Ruth, thank you.
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I know there must be gazillions of people struggling with all this but is anyone else finding their lives are morabor ut in cochlea pace ...slowing down to snail's pace (thank you google translator ...high risk strategy and I'll await... Continue reading
Posted May 14, 2020 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oh gosh you are so right Valerie...one day I’ll come across the Treaty of Utrecht in a book somewhere and it’ll all come flooding back. We spent hours and hours on wars and battles and now I’m wondering why? It could all have been so much more engaging.
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Thank you for that link Cheryl, I’m a huge fan of Kate’s.
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Oh yes, we absolutely want the Mary Seacole book!
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And what a childhood experience that must have been! I well remember temporary children in our primary school were always something of a novelty so we made a huge fuss of them and all wanted to be their friends...I hope it was similar for you.
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I’m so pleased that you enjoyed it Victoria, isn’t it just the gentlest of books and I can see it would be a wonderful listen. Yes we are blessed with sunshine and not taking it for granted so spending as much time outside as we can. I’m so pleased restrictions have been lifted here a little too...I want everyone to get out and soak up the sunshine as much as possible.. We’ve hit this on the back of a long dull grey winter compared to the Southern Hemisphere, who perhaps had summer stores of vitamin D, and I think that research is going to be fascinating when it emerges. I hope you get nicer weather soon too. Now then The Mirror and the Light...well I called a halt. It was somehow dragging me down when I needed uplifting, and my mind was wandering all over the place, but I know so many of you have read it and would love to talk about it so I’m very happy to set up a post for that to happen. Keep an eye out next week.
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It was March 20th 2007 when I wrote about Helen Rappaport's first book, No Place For Ladies - The untold story of women in the Crimean War and here we are thirteen years later, Helen and I firm friends and... Continue reading
Posted May 11, 2020 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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That’s a wonderful account, thank you for sharing it. I love the ‘super big picnic’ analogy because it sounds as if quite a few parties got a bit out of hand! It must have been hard to rein people in, who would have wanted to deny them their fun. I’m still smiling at my dad and the bonfires spreading to the houses!
Toggle Commented May 11, 2020 on We’ll Meet Again... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oh the hedge! It’s got a few bald patches and dead twigs which we daren't touch because then you create a big hole! But well we remember that year...it just looked completely dead and we thought we’d lost it. I’d still like to grub it up and replace with beech but I’m informed it would be a ‘very major job’ and ‘very expensive’ so the escallonia stays where it is.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2020 on We’ll Meet Again... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Goodness Erika, your family separated and grief-stricken and I know you had even more to contend with during the war. But hasn’t it been incredible to read all the treasured memories of parents here, I feel really privileged to have read all these stories.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2020 on We’ll Meet Again... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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The film scenes of unbridled joy and celebration were wonderful to see again and to think London would probably have been heaving with just as many people last weekend but for this, because we don’t need much of an excuse for a party like that. It was incredibly poignant to see the Red Arrows flying across an empty city.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2020 on We’ll Meet Again... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Yes collective action spoke volumes then as now. I was fascinated listening to the war veterans talking about their experiences, especially the women who were mobilised for the factories and the Bevan Boys down the mines. Everyone turns their hand to something when they are asked, then as now. It fills me with optimism in the face of so much else when you see that for all the world has changed the human spirit remains the same. We all want to help each other.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2020 on We’ll Meet Again... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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