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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
Community nurse once upon a time, now Shire-dweller & Dartmoor wanderer usually with book in hand or quilt in mind...
Interests: reading, quilting, books, walking, gardening,
Recent Activity
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One of you recommended The Greedy Queen by Annie Gray and I thank you for it. The Village Book Group theme was 'Food', I had bought it especially and read it and it would have fitted the bill perfectly had... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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'For a story to hold the child's attention, it must entertain her and arouse her curiosity. But to enrich her life, it must stimulate her imagination; help her to develop her intellect and to clarify her emotions; be attuned to... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
Found it, 2007! https://tinyurl.com/yyj8kcoh
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I’ve had a lot of ‘can’t be bothered with this too’. No interest in the characters or their lives. I think Fleishman is in Trouble might have been the last straw.
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I’d forgotten all about Needle in the Blood, it was a superb read. I’m trying to think when I read it, might be in the scribbles basement here somewhere. Wondering if it’s still in print?
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I’ve shortened the link so it should work now. Typepad gets poorly with the long ones😂
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I seem to be happily becalmed in the 1940s with my reading at the moment and I'm in no rush to seek out the wind or the currents that will move me on. Contemporary fiction just isn't cutting it right... Continue reading
Posted Oct 12, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I’m wondering when to start too Carol. I think my next foray into the sewing room will see me embark on the audio version proper.
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I’ve heard Hilary Mantel talk about this several times over the years Erika. She articulates it so well...the years of being misdiagnosed and misjudged etc. I heart the fame and success that her writing has brought her...she has borne something from which we all benefit and it seems even more well-deserved, if that makes sense.
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Wasn’t it good of me! And wasn’t the Tv adaptation good. I missed the stage version sadly but I gather the third TV series is planned and maybe there’ll be a repeat of the plays. Hilary Mantel did say that taking two years out to write for the theatre was the best thing she could have done. It really honed her writing skills to the essentials. And best of all we have 800+ pages to look forward to.
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Just replying to these comments is getting me excited about March 2020. I’m going to set aside days for this. Declare a week of Hilary Holidays.
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Just like Harry Potter, we’d all have to dress up of course!
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Go grab your copy now!
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I can completely understand the aversion in that case Erika, once someone’s ruined it for you it’s hard to row back on that. Winter reading perfection though.
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We should organise a mass all night readathon!
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Standing at the check-out in Waterstones the other day and a little pile of books caught my eye... The World of Wolf Hall - A Reading Guide to Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall & Bring Up the Bodies A free 50... Continue reading
Posted Oct 9, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I knew you had loved this book and I can certainly see why! I thought the access to education that Damian had was proof that sometimes the system DOES work in favour of those who might otherwise be disadvantaged. He certainly seems to have put it to good use and is doing well to portray the Gypsy community in a different and dare I say, more favourable light. I do wonder what the Gypsy community makes of it all too?
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Bringing you up to speed on more of my deckchair reading, which now seems such a distant memory, the sunshine having been replaced by the torrential rain that we knew had to come. All we can say is God bless... Continue reading
Posted Oct 6, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I have this on the shelf, I must revisit it. Thank you for the reminder.
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I’ve read the reviews and I’m not sure if I want to read it or not....should I? I’m finding current fiction, with its understandable preoccupation with the times In which we live, or those to come, all a bit trying at the moment. I seem to have happily regressed into the 1930s and 40s...Josephine Tey next on my list.
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Oh yes, love Flowers for Mrs Harris, was only looking at it the other day, I must read it again. Silver & Gold is mentioned in the bibliography for The Gown which I have just finished and loved. Pure escapism but a good interweaving of past and present day plot. Norman Hartnell sounds like a proper good egg.
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Happy memories still of interviewing Tracy at Port Eliot Festival backalong and I always look forward to a new book from her. A Single Thread, centred on the city of Winchester and its Cathedral, follows the life of Violet Speedwell... Continue reading
Posted Oct 3, 2019 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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What a paradise for children that must have been. We were within sniffing distance of the sewage farm at Hackbridge when we lived in Wallington and on the banks of the Wandle too which gave our air a very unique aroma when the wind blew in a particular direction. I seem to remember there were so many complaints about the sewage farm that they (somehow!) added a scent to it so this heady smell of violets masking something else became the norm. Now of course we live in occasional muck-spreading land and we love it all.
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Diane, what a treat to hear about a childhood from the other side of the world and what wonderful memories. Warm swimming, how lovely. We’d plunge into the sea sans wetsuits and come out shivering. I seem to remember always being cold on the beach and the swimming caps...yes, we never went near water without one and now I’m wondering why?
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Fran, there is another biography (though you may feel you know enough now!) which I am reading and finding less intense than Boel Westin’s. And now I’m realising that the letters give an honest account of Tove’s life in her own words. She really writes from the heart and with no guile or bluster. Everything feels so honest. I think Oxfam must have a franchise on the Moomin range.
Toggle Commented Oct 3, 2019 on Tove Jansson at dovegreyreader scribbles
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