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The aversion to sticky prices reminds me of "Large-Amplitude Periodic Oscillations in Suspension Bridges: Some New Connections with Nonlinear Analysis", A. C. Lazer; P. J. McKenna SIAM Review, Vol. 32, No. 4. (Dec., 1990), pp. 537-578. The TLDR summary is that it is much easier to do the structural analysis of suspension bridges if you assume that ropes (suspension cables) can be pushed -- that way you can use Hookes' Law and a linear analysis. The Tacoma Narrows bridge makes an appearance here, with a cameo appearance by the Cypress Street Viaduct (concrete in tension does not obey Hookes' law either).
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It’s a propaganda campaign for their persuadable voters, who could not possibly ever be considered “stupid”, no, no, not at all. You claim to be an economist — surely you have noticed that this sort of nonsense costs them nothing but yields them benefits. Under those conditions theory pretty much demands this sort of intellectual spamming, doesn’t it?
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The Lily Tomlin Rule applies: No matter how cynical you become, it's never enough to keep up.
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Echoing E Abrams point, in a town one out from Cambridge, when the housing supply increases, it results from a developer spending O(700K) for an old house to knock it down and replace with a pair of townhomes each selling for O(900K) (or whatever the market will bear, they start out asking more). Obviously given these numbers none of this has diddly to do with “affordable”, but when the housing supply increases at a tiny rate — and this tiny rate here has prompted pushback — the units can become less affordable, not more. And in theory there’s no arguing taste, but I have not met one person has looked at one of these knockdown+rebuild combos and said “that’s a good-looking building there”. In contrast, the recently-constructed Affordable-By-State-Rules housing is relatively attractive (but there’s far from enough of it). The secondary problem with wishing for greater density is that it’s not just zoning. Property taxes fund school systems, each additional resident is statistically a net cost to the local government. Construction of school buildings is subsdized by the state, but the state sets size standards — and built to maximum allowable size, the middle school is now full. If we add population, we add overflow portable classrooms. And obviously we’ve got NIMBY and “those people” out the ears, but dealing with those problems still leaves the rational reasons to go slow with growth. It-would-be-nice if we only had NIMBY to deal with. There’s additional problems with wishing all the residents with short commutes onto bicycles (*) — in-town traffic is not improved by a proportional amount, because induced demand finds new people to fill up the roads with cars. In theory that’s an economic good because it makes a fraction of the further-out commutes somewhat more feasible, but in practice it means that the hoped-for quality-of-life improvements from reduced traffic don’t occur. ( (*) I am one of those bicycle commuters already, 2500+ miles per year; when honestly reviewing the likely advantages to the town of getting more people to behave like me, I cannot include “reduced traffic”. Waze would see that empty road space and fill it up pronto, and at certain times of day it already does that.)
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Maybe he thought that rational policy (somewhere) would finally take hold, some combo of the Fed and Congress would reject this austerity nonsense, and we’d see a serious attempt to reduce unemployment. The longer this goes on, the more I begin to realize that we should just be thankful we don’t have an economic policy based on witch-burning and astrology. Could I also suggest a different structural problem that we might face in the future? It seems to me that young adults (we haz some) — even the employed ones — faced with uncertain employment and an economy at the mercy of crazy people, might get good at “underconsuming”. It could become a habit. Employed young adult #1 doesn’t have a driver’s license, doesn’t want one. Costs money to own a car, after all, and bike maintenance is not that hard. He eventually might want to upgrade to a “really expensive” bicycle, which might be as much as $5000 (which gets him lights, e-assist, substantial cargo ability, top-of-the-line parts) and still requires no insurance, no reserved parking place, etc.
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Shorter S McCoy: #notAllChristians. You’ve got money changers taking over your temple, WTF do you plan to do about it? In trademark terms, they’re abusing your brand, do you plan to defend it (against them, not against the people now confused by the polluted brand) or are you just going to whine that you’re misunderstood?
I am reluctant to recommend any of these guys, but we've had reasonably good luck with T-mobile over the years, and their latest international roaming plans look like screwing-the-unwary was not their design goal. For instance, see http://support.t-mobile.com/thread/60942?start=0&tstart=0 . I know my wife also took a T-mobile iPhone to Italy and we were not whacked by amazing charges, though she is an adult and perhaps paid attention to her configuration. They also have a coverage map: http://www.t-mobile.com/coverage.html
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The simple rule of thumb wins yet again: "conservative ideas are usually wrong". (And why is that? Because the goal is not to make things work better, the goal is either to enrich the wealthy, or to cadge a few votes with soothing tales to the tribal lizard brain.)
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So three years ago there was this http://dr2chase.wordpress.com/2011/07/23/ice-sheets-they-could-melt-faster/ (sorry, my blog, but journalists did a shitty job of explaining). And now there's this -- looks like we have a physical model that we can manage to known topography: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71l9lzLsBRc Wonder what the West Antarctic glaciers look like when they flow fast enough to raise sea level 5cm per year?
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Is this perhaps the Gish Gallop of shills for the super-rich? http://freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula/2013/03/07/the-gish-gallop-finally-comes-to-a-halt/
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The difference between real science and political science is that in real science we learn from our experiments instead of denying that the unexpected result occurred.
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A general explanation for the retreat to the recommendations of Very Serious People is Threat Rigidity: http://webuser.bus.umich.edu/janedut/Issue%20Selling/Staw%20et%20al%20threadt%20rigidity.pdf (I've been hearing about this from my wife since I think before we were married, this is the first or second most serious mistake usually made in any crisis, for very many values of crisis. I probably ended up with a skewed idea of the responsibilities of trained professionals because of her influence, but it has long seemed to me that any professional should always be on the lookout for this error in their own responses, and that therefore we should expect far better from the professionals selected to lead and advise our nation.)
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I think the apparent "explosion" of that warm blob of air when it reaches the arctic is an artifact of the map projection which is used. You might want to see if you could find a different projection to use, or perhaps one which was oriented differently to avoid significant distortion (e.g., run an "equator" from the desert to the pole).
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Apr 22, 2013