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Drew Moxon
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At the risk of revealing how much (little?) I tend to look at appendices, do any authors include summary visualizations in the appendix? I find that basic data plotting will give additional insight to those you mention that may be important (see Anscombe's quartet).
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Fair points on the signalling. My small brain can't comprehend being able to pick up the literature for a field in a few days! I was trying to find any private schools (since the current list has none!) and they're rather hard to find. George Washington University is the only one I could find that has a specialization in env/nat resource.
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That's what I meant when I said all the ivy leagues have it - they all have research strengths in it but no official field. Harvard comes closest: http://heep.hks.harvard.edu/phd-programs - basically a research program within your PhD. Also, Columbia has field classes in it, but no concentration. I wonder how you interpret the signal that the top schools which produce (non-ag school) environmental economists don't have an explicit field for it?
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University of Arizona, Arizona State University, University of Washington and University of Oregon all have an explicit environmental econ field. That being said, there are also universities that don't have it as a field but have "applied microeconomics" or something along those lines with enough faculty to complete an environmental econ specialty (I'm looking at you, ULCA). Also, you're missing all the ivy league - almost all of them have it :).
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Shouldn't they just have them disclose this before they testify for Congress or submit government reports? Doing it after the fact does seem a little "witch-huntish" (which I don't really support for climate change skeptics or proponents). I think it's just easier to say that if you testify for Congress or a government panel, perform research for the government or meet with any official for consultation you should be required to disclose your funding and/or memberships in political or policy groups. That solves the problem for everyone. I guess I shouldn't assume Congress would do things the efficient way :/.
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I would be interested to see days to review as well. If less time is spent per review when there are more papers reviewed, you could say there was more efficiency or you could say that the more papers are reviewed, the less quality time each one gets (no offense John)!
Toggle Commented Jan 13, 2015 on Navel gazing at Environmental Economics
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For #1, Google with alter ranking slightly depending on searcher "intent" (not entirely sure how good their intent algo's are...). Per #5 - sorry about that, content quality probably went down after I started posting. And for the general message - PESKY SEO TROLLS!
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In response to skepticism about the science, read this: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/13/47/18/PDF/ONeill.ea-2006-SubmittedLearningClimateChange.pdf . It points to the conclusion that given the potential impacts of climate change, inaction is not the optimal solution even if we are fairly uncertain about the exact thresholds. Also, in response to the political affiliation of the "economic viewpoint," there was a paper a while back that drew the conclusion that exposure to economics tends to make people more politically moderate - think of economics as a form of mean reversion. I can't find the paper offhand, but I assure you it exists :).
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I've seen the tool before, though I haven't used it. Looks like it would be helpful to use for overlaying a risk map for a hedonic housing price study.
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That's a good point - I would assume you would have to know some relative spatial distribution of risk in the policy portfolio in order to find an insurance company that will proxy for the risk in a given area, but that would be a good data point to check. You're thinking something like http://www.frbsf.org/econrsrch/workingp/pbc/wppb99-04.pdf ? Based on that paper it seems that there's a rise in stock prices due to increased demand for insurance insinuating that the risk is not incorporated in the price. As for flood risk, I would think that SF will have problems with long-term climate change-based flooding ( http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/science/earth/san-francisco-fights-erosion-as-coastal-cities-watch-closely.html ) as opposed to hurricane/seasonal flooding. That would be a long-term risk but one that could be forecast better than earthquakes. Thanks for the suggestions!
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There's also Python - it's increasingly competing with R in terms of the stats modules offered for it even though most people just think of it as an extensive programming language. I've talked to a number of grad students who are learning Python as part of their tool kit so it may pick up steam in the coming years.
Toggle Commented Apr 30, 2014 on I'm an anachronism at Environmental Economics
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I would say that the increase in driver miles along with the increase in ridership points to a substitution threshold being reached. If unemployment is going down in these metropolitan areas, it's likely that people are commuting longer distances to fill the jobs and as the commuter distance reaches the cost (time or $) threshold, they will start using public transit. Combining this with a net drop in employment, I could see these two results combining to reach fewer per capita rides, increased total rides and metro areas with lower unemployment. The last time I looked at the Census data, I think I recall that over time the average distance to work has increased as well, so that supports this armchair analysis all the more.
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Auctions do so solve the "optimal quantity problem." With a tax you have to calculate what price will produce the optimal quantity but with an auction you just have to set the quantity and let the market determine the price (thought hopefully you've run the model to have a pretty good idea what the price will be beforehand). In practice I see this as harder to do - when you have auctions for firm permits as opposed to permits for single consumers, the firms have more resources to devote to the auction process by comparison (in terms of research, buying the actual permits, legal costs, ect.). Additionally, these permits are often year-long permits so you don't have to commit to the auction process very often. I can't imagine your typical electricity customer wanting to buy their time spot for each morning of the week. There may be a way for an intermediary to buy the time slots for customers on a bulk basis, but this would still probably lead to slightly higher-than-efficient prices due to the rents sought by the intermediary. Note that I'm assuming that the market for intermediaries would not be a competitive market due to the capital requirements to enter the market in order to buy large numbers of time slots. If there are specific auction rules that could work on a frequent basis that would solve this problem (entirely possible!), I would be happy to hear about it! My auction theory knowledge doesn't go very deep.
Toggle Commented Feb 26, 2014 on Getting On the Grid at Environmental Economics
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This recent post on MIT's Tech Review provides an interesting technology solution and information asymmetry problem in the same article. The basic problem is that most electric vehicles will require overnight charging so that they are ready when the owners need their cars for the morning commute. Any given grid... Continue reading
Posted Feb 25, 2014 at Environmental Economics
Hi all, John has allowed me to have a stab at blogging here after a long time as a reader and a former life as a economics grad student. I'll give some details regarding myself so you have an idea of my background and my frame of reference. I was... Continue reading
Posted Feb 24, 2014 at Environmental Economics
Check out these two papers: http://www.webmeets.com/files/papers/ERE/WC3/650/wc3_carson.pdf http://www.ncl.ac.uk/nubs/assets/documents/workingpapers/economics/WP05-2010.pdf The first is the experiment that laid the ground for the theory in the second paper. It basically shows how the 2-alternative choice set in choice experiments results in a tendency toward status quo bias by virtue of the number of times the status quo appears as a choice in across respondents.
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For the open space questions, I think a "neutral" answer would be helpful so it's not a forced scale (I would have been inclined to answer neutrally on a few questions). Also, depending on what you use it for, you may want to specify the transportation mode used in the two "how far away is your trail" questions. In my case, they both take about the same time to get to, but one I drive to the and the other I walk to.
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I haven't read the book, but given some of his work on urban housing models, I'm surprised at the omission of moving/migration costs into the analysis. A relatively recent JEEM article (Bayer, Kaohane and Timmins, '09 if you're interested) showed the significant effects of moving costs on air quality-based migration patterns; I would expect this to be exacerbated when moving from "rural-to-city" rather than "city-to-city." I'll still buy the book though; you've sold me.
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