This is Erin Lane's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Erin Lane's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Erin Lane
Erin Lane is the creator of HolyHellions.com, a resource center for women exploring the connection between faith and feminism. While working in publishing she was able to work with authors ranging from sexpert Dr. Ruth Westheimer to evangelist Tony Campolo. Here she discovered the saddening lack of young feminist’s voices in mainstream media, particularly in mainstream religious media, and set out to help such women build their platforms. Her sense of vocation led her back to North Carolina where she currently is working on a Masters of Theological Studies degree at Duke University.
Recent Activity
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane I panicked in the middle of Puget Sound, breathing heavily, shaking erratically, shoveling warm pieces of salami and pecorino into my mouth before I passed out. I looked over my shoulder at the stoney beach where my brother and I had pushed off... Continue reading
Hmmm...good question. Ehyeh-Asher-Ehyeh or "I am who I am" is a pretty good start!
Well, what's funny, Morgan is that Gungor doesn't refer to God as a "she" in the song - but that of course was the logical implication and the teenagers were keen to that logic! There is hope yet. And your comment is a reminder to me to keep using the feminine pronoun liberally - along with the masculine - without fear of a being called a heretic. It is, after all, good old orthodox Christianity to believe in a gender-full God.
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane Christianity doesn’t make sense. Not in the formulaic way that algebraic equations or verb conjugations add up. With this much, church historian and theologian N.T. Wright would agree. The kind of sense he describes in Simply Christian: Why Christianity Makes Sense is characterized... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane Teenagers are model rebels; they are also deceptively faithful. My husband, Rush, works with these punky pubescents for a living. He’s a youth pastor (God bless him, as the southerners say) who funds my writing habit by spending Sunday through Thursday talking to... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane Before I left for a summer in Seattle, my husband leaned over to me over a celebratory one-year of graduate school completed dinner of mac-n-cheese and sauvignon blanc and asked me, "So what will you remember?" I laughed. Then became frustrated. And finally... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane Theology is the stuff of imagination. I do not mean to argue that theology is fantastical or fanatical - although it can be both those things. Rather, theology requires the exercise of creativity: dreaming of words, images, and gestures for a God who... Continue reading
Adam - I just got to reading your post this week and love your articulation of the issue. With a youth pastor for a husband, I see this as a particularly thorny issue for teen ministry. Young people perhaps need the safety of same-gendered groups to speak frankly about their budding sexuality - but again, what does this communicate to those who can't or don't put themselves in the binary guy/gal category? Even having same-sex youth leaders sadly is not a guarantee that abuses won't happen. I love the idea of forming teen groups around interests - and trying your butt off to not let one group become stereotyped as the feminine or masculine one.
Thanks, Lara, for raising the issue of how (and why) to talk about sexuality on the blog. As a daughter of an OB-GYN nurse I am so grateful for the medical explanation of sex so early on in life (Way to go to Ray, too!). Perhaps the birthing videos were a bit much...but they certainly impressed upon me the gravity of our biology. One thing to remember when talking about sexuality - especially with teens: Any virtue can become a vice if we are unbalanced in its pursuit. For many teens the struggle is to be chaste, but others may need to be taught the healthy exercise of sensuality.
Ah, I wish I could take each of you to coffee and mull over these sentiments. Chris - I concur with Andrew about how important your thoughts are. The question I come back to is: Who is my church community? Is it a cop out to say that it's my family - my brother with whom I'm now living thousands of miles away from home or my dad who I'm able to see regularly only with multiple trips out West every year? Can I say it's my friends - the ones with whom I do spend time regularly in North Carolina but who are never in the pew next to me on Sunday morning? Can it be the ones I am already "doing life" with although we're not calling it church?
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane I am a big believer in going to church despite being rather inconsistent myself. For those of you who have been reading this blog from the beginning, you'll recall that I was "dating churches" back in January and feeling antsy to go steady... Continue reading
I hesitated to even write this post, not wanting to throw the category of "female faculty in theological education" under the bus. I envy that David and Barbara made real connections with women role models at divinity school and hope that my experience will change in my final year. However, I do think there's something going on institutionally that puts pressure on untenured female faculty at many universities to perform double-duty as both good Christian women (read: feminine homemakers) and esteemed academicians (read: masculine professionals).
Image
You know that woman. That woman who doesn't like other women. That woman who claims that she'd rather work for a man than deal with the supposedly high-maintenance emotional work required of a female boss. Just last year, an informal poll of ForbesWomen's Facebook group confirmed what the latest Gallup... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane Funny girls ain't no joke. They are a rarified rush of redemptive humor. Within their satirical, slap stick, and sarcastic rhetoric, they hold the paradox of laugh-your-rump-off playfulness and serious-as-all-get-out truthfulness. I dream of a church where these women are as plentiful (and... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane I've been a bad feminist. For years, I've been decidedly pro-woman and ambiguously pro-gay. Walking the Christian feminist tight rope always has me feeling like I'm one step away from heresy. In one breath I defend the authority of women in the church... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane If I thought God walked among us again in anyone’s body, it would be in the leathered skin and tiny bones of my mother, Perky Patty. My mom got her nick name from my older brother Charlie when we were in middle school.... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane I mourn Osama Bin Laden's death. No, I am not marxist, communist, or anti-American. I am a Christian living in eschatological tension between the already of God's victory over death and the not yet of humanity's experience of death. It's the not yet... Continue reading
Thank you for these wonderfully thoughtful and supportive comments. It makes me even more adamant that the church needs to be more creative and imaginative in its preaching and programs. Perhaps small groups should have a smattering of people from all walks of vocational life? Perhaps those who volunteer in the nursery or with the youth should be people that DON'T have children rather than those who already have a stake in those ministries? And perhaps sermon illustrations should reflect the diversity of metaphors the text itself offers?
I hear you, Kathryn. My husband has learned the art of reverse psychology in this department. The more space he assures me I have for myself, the more I choose time with him out of my wellspring of energy (and not guilt). There's something to this whole love + free-will formula God created...
These comments all point to the human desire to have enough, to know what is enough, and, as Eric pointed out, to be enough. What's fascinating about the connection to "doing enough" is that the word for enough in Hab 2:5 is indeed translated as rest in the NIV. Not having enough is never having rest, a stark contrast to the life Jesus promises.
Image
A Gathering Voices post by Erin Lane I've never been gaga for babies, their newborn bodies pinked and puffed. It's too soon to know who they really look like, what sort of personality is buried beneath their chub, and when they'll start saying the darndest things. I know this admonition... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices Post by Erin Lane What does it mean to have “enough”? Ethicists and economists alike have tried to answer that question within a field referred to as happiness studies. Thought to have originated in the late 1970s, happiness studies have concluded two very interesting points. The first... Continue reading
Image
A Gathering Voices Post by Erin Lane Lament won't leave me alone. Lament is in the classroom as we poured over the book of Job. Lament is in the news as we continue to hear stories of pain in the protests of Egypt, Yemen, Iraq, and Afghanistan. And lament is... Continue reading
Image
A Gather Voices Post by Erin Lane I have never lived alone. I shot straight from a high school bedroom plastered with signed autographs from Days of Our Lives soap stars to a dorm room stocked full of Diet Cokes and Smart Pop. Not more than two months after graduating... Continue reading
Eric, Thank you for the time you put into your comment on the fullness of pacifism. I was speaking out of my own place of brokenness in the paragraph you cite, wanting to be a pacifist but instead passively responding out of my fear to engage. Pacifism is indeed a very active engagement with the world's injustice, as you yourself have demonstrated. I am grateful for your words of both challenge and encouragement;