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figurewizard
UK
Free cashflow and profit and loss forecasting and planning online
Recent Activity
Just what is this government trying to do to itself? This might come across as a reasonable proposal for mandarins and MPs closeted in a Westminster committee room but to the public at large it will be regarded as a stinker.
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Whoever dreamt up the idea of slapping VAT on hot pies as a means of contributing to the resolution of our structural deficit needs to get out more.
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The "imperfect architecture" of the Euro was based however on the rules drawn up by the EU themselves which they then began to break; Germany and France included. No sanctions for such breaches were ever applied. Now they talk about a new set of rules. With a track record like theirs the markets are likely to view any new arrangement with one jaundiced eye at least.
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That's why I suspect that the EU secretly agree with Callannan, given that they have now come up with a demand that for the Greek austerity plan to be acceptable to them, all opposition parties must sign up irrevocably to it too. Surely they must know that even if Greece went along with the idea of stripping the democratic process out of their politics (unlikely) to enable a deal, it wouldn't wash with the people on the streets in Athens. What is going on at present represents a new low; even for the EU.
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The midday news on BBC TV on this first showed Milliband's photo opportunity, where he visited a local school. The sight of him sitting at a desk in a classroom seemed somehow strangely appropriate.
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P.S. Proposing to put Brown on trial for his reckless stewardship both as Chancellor and PM would go down well too.The charge could be one of; 'causing grievous fiscal harm with intent.'
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Well he got one thing right when he stressed the importance of 'rebuilding his party.' However due to the fact that he and the entire opposition front bench were up to their eyeballs in Labour's comprehensive demolition of our economy, I suggest that he starts by sacking the lot of them and then himself.
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Typically short sighted by Labour planners. Anyone in business will tell you never to knock the competition. To do so renders your message to: 'Don't buy their rubbish, buy my rubbish instead.'
You're right that we are not 'at the table' but what's on the menu is well past its sell by date.
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If Osborne were able to announce tax cuts of £9.2 billion a year with some emphasis on small and medium sized businesses; which is where most new jobs would come from and companies engaged in manufacturing while continuing to mitigate the burden of public sector spending, the re-balancing of our economy could be achieved in short order. It would also point us towards real and sustainable prosperity for the future. Handing this cash out to Brussels with its bloated bureaucracy and failed Euro project instead seems to be bizarre.
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At least the idiot bankers who splashed out on dodgy securities didn't know that at the time but for our government to offer one penny of tax payers' cash to prop up what the rest of the world now knows is a wholly discredited Euro would be indefensible.
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This sounds like a re engineered version of the Glass Steagall act and is all the more welcome for it. Glass Steagall was in force for sixty six years and we know that US banking and that of the others others who followed its lead went on to survive the rest of the great depression and a world war. What we also know is that allowing deposit taking retail banks to engage in the investment activity that was the other side of the Glass Steagall coin has resulted in a near collapse of the banking system and world wide recession. I don't care who takes the credit for this proposal as long as they implement it.
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If Clegg and others act to bring the coalition down our triple A rating could be under threat. Given the loss of the Clegg factor that forced the coalition on us and an equally querulous Labour party under Milliband's leadership, an early election might be worth the risk.
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Clegg scoring 7% as a strong leader and 54% as a weak one is most revealing. There was a huge surge of support for the Lib - Dems at the last election on the back of the expenses scandal, which had touched his party far more lightly than the others. It looks like that honeymoon has long since hit the buffers and the longer the EU shambles continues, the longer his party will stay there.
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I see that one of the five quangos mentioned is defunct while another has not met for twenty five years. Why has it taken so long for Francis Maude to discover this and how long will the review he proposes start to swing the axe?
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How can you apply a coherent policy to today's dysfunctional people and expect it to work other than in the margin? The only solution to at least mitigating this problem for the future is to try to improve on the current scandalously poor standard of education in this country.
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I do not disagree with anything you say but at the time when I read that Beckett was to become our principal representative for foreign affairs I was filled with despair.
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The appointment of Margaret Beckett as secretary of state for the foreign office; someone wholly unsuited to the post both by intellect or experience said it all at the time. This is just one example of the mediocrity of the majority of people charged with running Blair and Brown's government which has done so much damage to this country.
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What with the new generation of Conservative MPs and the John Redwoods, Ken Clarke et al we seem to have the best of both worlds. Citizen MPs matter for any political party because they help to keep it on its toes. This is where Labour falls down. Its version of citizen MPS are almost exclusively drawn from two narrow interest groups; the trades unions and the public sector, neither of which are perceived to be doing this country any favours at the moment.
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Milliband accuses Cameron of 'breaking his promise' on private sector jobs, going on to underline the 13 to 1 ratio of public sector job losses versus jobs created in the private sector. All this jibe has achieved is to remind everyone that Cameron is keeping his promise to get to grips with the the public sector deficit.
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Milliband is trying to shoot sparrows in the dark. His 13 to 1 ratio vis a vis public / private jobs is not going to convince anyone with half a brain that the coalition is responsible for these unemployment figures. If Labour Uncut is anything to go by conservatives are not the only ones to see him as being an ineffective leader of the opposition.
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And while all this would be going on the pound would be rapidly sliding into crisis. It is far better to allow the markets to bring down the Euro first as looks likely. Then with all Europhiles effectively discredited and a clear programme for eventual recovery, a majority Conservative government would be on the cards.
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Not before time. Canada needs to be congratulated for this move. Global warming may well be a reality but the science revealed by Maunder and Herschel (far more emminent people than Huhne) in the nineteenth century point the finger firmly at the sun. Bashing ourselves over the head and possibly bankrupting ourselves in the process will only make matters worse.
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SMEs and new businesses that are yet to start up are the key to job creation and economic recovery. Simply removing the burden of EU regulation will not be enough to enable them to do the job though; there is home bred regulation that needs to be addressed too. The costs of all regulation have been suffocating our small businesses for years. One only has to look at the many thousands of jobs in call centres that have been lost by those operations being relocated to India to realise how important addressing the issue of regulation has become. In order to survive small business have to conserve their cash flow. This is more important than usual today as the banks are effectively on a go slow where commercial lending is concerned: But the government also has its part to play by ensuring that taxation for young businesses is set at a level to enable them to use their resources in the furtherance of trade, rather than helping to prop up a bloated public sector.
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