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Gan Charles
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Thank you for your analysis. Now I have a shot when I file for my candidacy in the 2018 election.
The Opposition is of the illusion that the UN is on their side. Hogwash! Even if it were, opposition cannot influnce who becomes Cameroon's UN Ambassador let alone choose. No wonder the opposition is a dismal failure. They think in such illogical terms and seem to let emotions cloud their reasoning.
Anyone calling for querilla warfare should start leading one. As usual you are inciting violence for someone else to be in the forefront. Typical Cameroonian! That is why the system will not change.
What did the "The Commando Alliance Brotherhood of Cameroun" succeed in acomplishing? Can someone please explain.
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The opposition has been ineffective in Cameroon because they have never been transparent and therefore are not trusted by the majority of the people. Criticism has been met with expulsion from the ranks and a label of infiltrator. What this has done is confirm that the opposition is incapable of fair governance and has precipitated ites irrelevance, something I had predicted several years ago in this forum. The bottom line is that the opposition has never behaved any differently from the party in power. I am sure supporters will beg to differ. There are those that will ask not to criticize but to take up the challenge. I have chosen to criticize and the opposition has chosen to oppose; two different but important roles in the political theater. It must also be noted that the cultural and ethnic makeup of Cameroon is conducive to the kind of political leadership she has. Depending on who is counting Cameroon is made up of anywhere from 250 to 350 tribes, each of which views the other with some level of suspicion and distrust. For real political change to be manifested, tribal affiliation has to give way to political ideolog. But this is a very long way off. Until then, no amount of suffering or disenfranchisement will convince the Cameroonian population that it is worth risking their lives to go out into the streets in the numbers that is required to overwhelm the Biya political and military machines in order to bring down the establishment and issue in a new era.
The opposition parties should have brainstormed to stop Biya from changing the constitution that allowed him to run in perpetuity. What they are doing now is to devise a doomed strategy. It has been alleged that the election was marred with fraud. I have no doubt that this occured, but knowing how the opposition operates, I am positive the fraud was not properly documented. Claims must be backed up by proper documentation otherwise it is viewed as speculation that cannot be validated. At the end of the day nothing will change. The courts will certify Biya has won. All the promises he made before the elections, as he has done in the past, will be ignored. Cameroon will simmer for another sevens years. The opposition will run around crying foul as ususal and their strategy will remain same.
Abanda - It is a known fact that there is a deep division between the NW and SW peoples of Southern Cameroons for all the reasons we know. A NW'ner could list as many grivences as you just mentioned in your post. How long can this distrust be perpetuated? Will the two sides ever look past the PAST? If anything, the failures of the past should galvanize Anglophones to unite for a better future. Both sides are guilty of digging up the past and quick to lay blame. It is distructive.
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Southern Cameroons had unsophisticated leaders who could not and did not fathom the long term consequence of their decisions. The damage that was done is irriversible. Dr. Ngoh has stated cleary how Southern Cameroons got into this mess. Unfortunately, the only good that could come from this is that this gross derailment of a people by her leaders is documented in history.
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Osana Mbing Laughin - Calling me names will not change the facts as I have outlined them. It is mentality like yours that has blinded the Cameroonians that propose change from conducting their leadership in a manner that rises above that of the present government. You seem to think that the movements for change is not succeeding because the government in putting restrictions on the internet. The question I have for you is what messages do you or all the other change agents have that will rally the majority of Cameroonians to come out en masse to protest? You and all those that want change have no credibility - zero. That's why you have nothing to show for it, internet or otherwise. You can challenge me all you want - the results speak for themselves. My advise to you - I assume you are in Diaspora -is to get organized and raise funds , plenty of it. When that happens you will be in a position to influence affairs in Cameroon. Until Cameroonians are willing to put their money, energy and committment to change we will continue to be frustrated. I think that is what you are experiencing. I am not the enemy.
Diaspora does not have the organization to effect change in Cameroon. It is one thing to expose facts but entirely erroneous to spread unfounded rumours. Rumours hurt the credibility of the perpetrator. Yes the Government, as well as anyone defamed by unsubstansiated romours, has the right to defend itself. The problem with the so-called Diaspora elements is that they are so fragmented with different agendas, some being outright vandetta against the Government more for personal, selfish reasons and less for the interest of the Cameroon people. I am no defender of the Government, in fact I am one of its harshest criticts. But, for heavens sake get your fact straight before making it public or you end up looking follish. On the other hand, due to the lack of credibility and unity amongst those claiming to be leaders in Diaspora, there has not been a united front that has been able to bring the force to bear on the administration and demand the necessary accountability and change. What you are left with is a hodge podge of egocentric individuals dissiminating unfounded roumours as fact. Wonder why the government is still in power. Cameroonians abroad have organized mostly on tribal rather than ideological lines. This feeds to the ethnic divde that is prevalent in Cameroon and plays right into the hands of the Goverment. You would think that living overseas and experiencing democracies that have succeeded on ideological grounds would make Cameroonians change thier behaviour and come together as one committed to influencing the direction of Cameroon on common grounds. Not so. Cameroonians have carried their tribal divisions, distrust and dismissal without verification of anyone with a new idea and a lack of committment and support that is required for the success of all movements for change, especially the ones that seek to change entrenched currupt societies. Cameroonians can maintain thier tribal afflilations for cultural and ethnic reasons but need to remove tribal barriers when it comes to nation building.
It is one thing to expose facts but entirely erroneous to spread unfounded rumours. Rumours hurt the credibility of the perpetrator. Yes the Government, as well as anyone defamed by unsubstansiated romours, has the right to defend itself. The problem with the so-called Diaspora elements is that they are so fragmented with different agendas, some being outright vandetta against the Government more for personal, selfish reasons and less for the interest of the Cameroon people. I am no defender of the Government, in fact I am one of its harshest criticts. But, for heavens sake get your fact straight before. On the other hand, due to the lack of credibility and unity amongst those claiming to be leaders in Diaspora, there has not been a united front that has been able to unite Cameroonians to bring the force to bear on the administration and demand accountability. What you are left with is a hodge podge of egocentric individuals dissiminating unfounded roumours as fact. Wonder why the government is still in power. Get serious people!
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Bob Bristol - I agree with you to a point. If you are old enough you will recall that in the sixties "Wambo le Courent" and "Takala Selestin" were going to take out Ahidjo. Just the two of them. The plot failed only because Mgr. Ndongmo developed cold feet at the last moment becuase he "did not want bloodshed". Takala and Wambo faced the firing squad while the Vatican extracted Ndongmo, saving his life. With this history, it is hard for Cameroonians to trust, especially when it come to such serious matters. So you need two to tango. The technicians to take him out and the administrator to take over. As you can see, some brave compatriots had devised a plan and were prepared to carry it out. Cameroonians are NOT all COWARDS after all.
Dr. Nfor N Susungi's proposal warrants consideration, but I am at a loss at the following key statement: "The reason why the Newcam Prosperity Pact is politically neutral is because it is my intention to formally propose it to the CPDM and the SDF for consideration so that these two important parties can jointly back my candidature for the October 2011 elections." Is Newcam Prosperity Pact a political party or a mediator? You can not be politically neutral while declaring your cadidacy. It is unclear to me how he intends for the CPDM and SDF to back his candidacy. Is he saying that by presenting this proposal to both the SDF and CPDM, these parties will see the wisdom and approve his candidacy? How credible will the endorsement be? Why would the the CPDM back a candidacy that may remove them from power? I hope the Dr. mispoke and can clarify this statement. My advice to the Dr. is to take his idea directly to the Cameroonian people. Make this proposal on the campaign trail and maybe it will gain traction. In the course of doing this he may just convince the ruling cabal that there will be no retributions if he were to be elected president. Making a deal with leadership of the SDF and CPDM will not convince the majority of Cameroonians that he is a serious candidate.
A popular revolution will NEVER succeed in Cameroon due primarily to it's plurality. For all the reasons that anyone born in Cameroon knows, convincing a majority of the population to engange in the kind of civil disobedience or uprisiing that has taken place elsewhere is IMPOSSIBLE. Some have pointed to South Africa's ANC. The South African liberation movement succeeded for the following reasons. The first is that the majority of South African Blacks speak a common language and have a common culture. The ANC was the ONLY MAJOR black political party and included 'other ethnicities' - indian born South Africans for example. The ANC identified and made Mandela the face and symbol of the movement. South Africa already had an effect administrative, albeit aphathied, structure in place. And the Military wing complimented the organization. The only time Cameroon came close was a meaningful revolt was during the 1992 election when SDF was very popular, the country was geared up for change and could have tolerated a bloody upraising if the SDF had called for it and, more importantly, if the SDF had had the foresight to establish a military wing. Today, the SDF is severely weakened by its internal problems. The only choice for Cameroon may be to follow Ghana's model. First a well intentioned midlevel officer wipes everyone at the top. Rules the country for 10-15 years establishing civil societal structures that can lead to democratic beginings.
There are actually some chiefs or fons in diaspora, so not all are impersonators. That said, I am at a loss as to the purpose of these meetings. Is the Ambassador saying that he will relay concerns of those in the meetings to the Cameroon government? And if that were the case, does he think the government will address these issues? This is another reactive gimmick to pacify Cameroonians and make them feel the government is listening to them. The Ambassador suggests a quarterly meeting schedule. I hope he can show progress in the next few quarters, that is if the attendees intend to conduct serious discuss and demand progress reports from Mr. Ambassador. Or is is just going to "chop" as usual.
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I have said it before that tyrants have no soul. Anyone who would render his country destitute is evil. The only way a head of state can sleep soundly with such devastation and misery around him is if this person does not believe in eternal life. He believes he will not have to answer to a higher being. Mr. Biya is making a mockery of his catholic faith. The way he governs Cameroon reminds me of one Peace Corp volunteer's observation of the life in Cameroon: He was amazed at how a teacher , neatly dressed for school, would carefully step over muddy puddles and potholes on his way to school. Mr. Biya quite easily steps over the difficulty Cameroonians face each day.
Toggle Commented Mar 25, 2011 on If Not Biya, Who? at The Chia Report
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Until the Cameroonian leader governs on behalf of Cameroon first then other interest second there will not be progress. And until the Bamenda man and the Limbe man and the Garoua man and the Beti man or woman etc. etc. acknowledge that we are in the same boat, this Cameroon problem will never be resolved.
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The Caucasian self-preserves while the Negroid self-destructs. Around the world and throughout history when the chips were down and the Caucasian realized the game was up they always found a way to negotiate and move on. The Negroid will fight on, never acknowledging that the game is over and vowing to bring down the house with him. This selfish behaviour is the reason the race will never reach its potential. There are lessons to be learned indeed!
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You cannot organize the kind of turnout as seen in Tunisia through Social Media in Cameroon. For starters, despite the prevalence of cell phones, many people with cell phones cannot read SMSs. Access to computers are limited to mainly University students and graduates who frequent cyber cafes. Most other visit just to retrieve emails from loved ones or check 419 progress. In short the size of the population that such digital disposition will reach is very small as would be required to mount a meaningful protest. Forgetting digital methods, Cameroonians have other well traditional means of disseminating information - village town crier, churches, meeting groups etc. The problem with protest not picking up is not a question of communication channels but of complacency. Many groups in Cameroon do not believe there is anything to fight for. Granted, the economy is bad and people are hurting but they can still eat and drink. They still do not believe that they hurt enough to put their lives on the line. Until the majority of groups internalize the cruel disenfranchisement, nothing will happen in the like of mass protest and nothing will be done about it. Diaspora may think that they are doing those back home by protesting and sending a message to the international community. In Cameroon most of those protests have no credibility. There is no effective co-ordination between the protest abroad and the movement at home. Nothing on ground to gauge , mange and promote activities. You find all these organizations abroad claiming to be fighting for and representing change in Cameroon but they have no community involvement in the country. They community views them with suspicion because they have no programs in place to educate the community as to the agenda and provide services that are better than what the government is providing. You need to gain the hearts and minds of the people. In so doing you gain their trust and just maybe you begin to understand why all the movement for change has been a failure so far. It takes time. I bet that if all the groups seeking change had spent the past 28 years establishing community outreach programs they would have seen more success in rallying people to their cause. You can't just come in as a "stranger" expect your ideas to be embraced and expect people to die for it - even if everyone agrees that change makes sense.
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Maxine - The majority of Cameroonians do not share your love for your father. You are in denial. The first step in ridding yourself of this delusion is to admit there is a problem with the Biya regime. You have been so brainwashed by your association with the regime that I am glad you have found this blog. You will be cleansed and you will see the light. Your first instinct is denial and name calling. Soon the facts and argument made here will start to make sense to you. Lastly you will join the fold. When the time comes, and I know it will be soon. We will welcome you with opened arms, just like the prodigal son, or is it daughter. Does not matter because we seek inclusion not exclusion.
Be careful when spreading unconfirmed rumors.
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Maxine - I do understand. Inexperience is no excuse. Protesting the Biya regime either overtly or covertly has been going on for years. These Diaspora protesters and organizers are supposed to be educated, the creme of the Cameroon crop. It is a shame if they do not know what they are doing. They should study other past successful uprisings and modify to apply to the Cameroon situation. This confirms my belief that most of these characters are either opportunists or mainly those that left the country with little or no education and are just projecting their ineptitude elsewhere and in some quarters making a mockery of themselves. I am a proponent of doing your homework on an issue or look foolish explaining it. If you ask the majority of those holding signs the goal of the protest, I am sure only a handful will be able to articulate the reasons, goals and intended outcomes. All I hear is "Biya must go". Then what? It is not good enough to kick Biya out. Propose options. These are the same people who leave Cameroon to go abroad without a plan and now they want to change a whole nation. This is why the call for change has failed and will continue to fail. For people to take up a cause you must state why change is needed (eg replace corrupt regime), how you intend to make the change (eg through civil disobedience etc ) and lastly a replacement road map. People will follow if they are convinced and more importantly, will be able to explain the the next person why they are believers. I have not heard that from the various groups that want to take over Cameroon, at least they do not want to explain that part for fear they will be held accountable as is the case with the current regime and all the oppositions parties that seek to replace it. Movements for change in Cameroon as elsewhere rely heavily on funds from supporters to strive. Cameroonians are the worst when it comes to donating for causes, even those they pretend to champion. They will spend thousands on parties, drinks, good times but as soon as donations for causes are mentioned they come up with excuses, or the BIG MAN syndrome sets in (this is where people pledge in public without the intention to follow through). Cameroonians need to put their money where their mouth is. This not inexperience, this is ineptitude!
Cameroonians are mostly all talk when it comes to supporting a cause. Sure a few may come out to protest and be seen, but their motivation is usually unclear. There often no sustainably of the principles for which they protested. In addition to organization and strategy, a movement requires funding in order to operate. Movements are funded by supporters and the well off (supposed big talkers in Diaspora) the individual supporter or group the more money they would donate to the cause. But ask Cameroonians to support a cause and you start to get excuses. But they can party!!! One other flaw is that people seem to feel that there is not a direct benefit to them, forgetting the fact that this is for the good of the country as a whole. Change in most societies have come from some significant, mostly monetary support from abroad. Because those abroad cannot be on ground their contributions would make a big difference in helping fund logistics etc. Problem with this is that there has not been the accountability on the part of the leaders of some of these movements giving the holdouts more excuses not to contribute. From my experience and given the history of the various movements for change, I do not see any hope for Cameroon.
Nothing I have seen or foresee gives me reason to believe change is close in Cameroon. Come 2012 Biya will still be president of Cameroon and these discussion will continue. Cameroon is nowhere near instituting all the elements necessary to effect a change. We are all sticking our heads in the sand. We peruse the same old strategies and weave the same tired rhetoric. We are stuck in the same spot. It has been 28 years. Lets not count Ahidjo's era, since the movement for change was not yet born. The only thing that will save Cameroon is space aliens, swooping down and snatching Biya and his regime yonder. Baring this daring but grateful act, come 2012 we will still be having this conversation.
Cameroonians are mostly all talk when it comes to supporting a cause. Sure a few may come out to protest and be seen, but their motivation is usually unclear. There often no sustainably of the principles for which they protested. In addition to organization and strategy, a movement requires funding in order to operate. Movements are funded by supporters and the well off (supposed big talkers in Diaspora) the individual supporter or group the more money they would donate to the cause. But ask Cameroonians to support a cause and you start to get excuses. But they can party!!! One other flaw is that people seem to feel that there is not a direct benefit to them, forgetting the fact that this is for the good of the country as a whole. Change in most societies have come from some significant, mostly monetary support from abroad. Because those abroad cannot be on ground their contributions would make a big difference in helping fund logistics etc. Problem with this is that there has not been the accountability on the part of the leaders of some of these movements giving the holouts more excuses not to contribute. From my experience and given the history of the various movements for change, I do not see any hope for Cameroon.