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Gary Corby
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Hi Sharon, I've been trying off and on to see your video, and it hasn't worked. You might need to let the people running it know.
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That is just totally weird. Now if this were a novel, Rocco would turn up one day bleeding from a dozen bullet wounds and with a story from E's time as a mercenary commander in the Congo.
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Not that I endorse the behaviour, but I wonder if her sales went up as a result of the spat?
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I'm so glad someone else out there likes Ngaio Marsh. Her mysteries were exceptional, yet she seems to be so very underrated. I can't work it out.
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I don't share this phobia, but I totally understand where it comes from, and English teachers have a lot to answer for. Teenage guys are forced to read all sorts of dreck at school. Jane Austen springs to mind. One of the greatest writers of all time, granted, but she was definitely not for guys. (In passing, it was a huge improvement when they added the zombies...) The conclusion is obvious: women write stuff no self-respecting teenage male would want to touch. Lesson learned, and adhered to for life. And when they do assign something written by a guy, it's DH Lawrence or (shudder) Thomas Hardy, or someone else you suspect was probably a woman writing under a pseudonym. This problem would go away if teachers assigned books by women that teenage males actually liked. The problem is, I suspect there aren't all that many. I recall devouring lots of Ursula Le Guin at that age, and probably other women SF writers would fit the bill. The women writing thrillers would be good too.
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It is also just about the oldest plot device in human history. When Cassandra refused to put out for Apollo, he cursed her always to tell the truth and never to be believed. Then when Helen turned up on the doorstep, Cassandra started raving about invaders and dead relatives...
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There is a winery called Mas de Tourelles, in Provence in Southern France, which makes wine in the old Roman fashion, with a wine press that duplicates Roman design, using the methods described by Roman writers, and adding the same ingredients as the Romans put into their own wines. I reviewed all three of their Roman vintages, Turriculae, Mulsum and Carenum, here: http://blog.garycorby.com/labels/Wine.html
Toggle Commented Jan 11, 2009 on wine in ancient rome at Roman History Books and More
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So long, Abby, and thanks for all the posts! You've been fun and educational to read.
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I'm a complete newbie at this business, so I speak from a state of profound cluelessness. I have, however, survived the query process with sanity more or less intact, so I do have my 2 cents to toss in. I think it's important to be writing short stories and getting them out there - anywhere! - as long as they go to a place where another human being is providing some editorial control, no matter how amateurish. The great fear is that your writing isn't good enough; there's no way to tell from those useless form rejects. If you can move some short stories into freebie e-zines or local mags, and someone else says nice things about a story you wrote, then it gives you confidence. If you can get to the point where you've placed a number of short stories, you get used to being accepted: a novel concept! Then, the next time an agent says, "not right for us," you have some degree of confidence it means what it says, and isn't code for, "you suck totally." Resilience to rejection increases because you know you can place, albeit at a low level, and you've been getting rapid feedback too.
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