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Dr. Ayala
Pediatrician, artist, mom and serious home cook, blogs about nutrition and health
Recent Activity
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If you love coffee the latest research is encouraging, coffee drinking is linked with good health. A new study looks beyond the association: Is there a plausible mechanism that would explain how coffee promotes health? Continue reading
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A new study shows that school cafeterias are noisy, and that the noise level mattered: With each decibel increase in the cafeteria sound level kids ate less fruits and veggies. Continue reading
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We already know that ads on TV and other traditional media have a role in the obesity epidemic. Turns out, exposure to Instagram influencers can also make kids overeat. Continue reading
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Highly processed foods such as soft drinks, French fries, processed meats, cookies, sweetened cereals and salty snacks, make up more than half of the caloric intake of the average American; a new study finds that eating more ultra-processed food was associated with a 30 percent higher risk of early death. Continue reading
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Exercise is a powerful keystone health habit – it can spill over to other parts of life, causing a ripple effect. A new study shows that young people who start to exercise also eat healthier without being told to. Continue reading
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Predictions can shape behaviors and decisions that eventually make the prediction come true. Could learning that you're at high risk of obesity increase your risk? Continue reading
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You don’t need to declare Sugar-Free-January, or go full Keto to enjoy the benefits of a reduced sugar diet, nor do you need to suffer the deprivation complete dessert abstinence, according to a new study. Continue reading
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Are some days more prone to adverse events than others? Turns out, holiday heart attacks aren't a myth, shows a new study, and cold weather doesn't explain the spike in disease. Here's what you can do to keep healthy. Continue reading
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Most people think about metabolic health in terms of leanness vs. obesity. But BMI doesn’t tell the whole story, and it’s the internal biochemical processes that affect the risk of a wide array of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, heart and vascular disease. Continue reading
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Young kids who object to new foods might react better to new veggies presented separately and of course repeatedly. Kind of good news, as this is the easiest way to do it. Continue reading
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How much weight can you gain over Thanksgiving? The answer to this question may be encouraging, but there's a big caveat. Continue reading
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Whether we like it or not, online grocery shopping, the final online frontier, is being conquered. Will this shift lead to better eating habits? Continue reading
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Most people spend just a minute or two reading a menu; the placement of calorie counts can therefore determine if their information is considered or simply ignored. Continue reading
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A shift towards eating more plant foods and less meat benefits personal health and the health of our environment. An experiment in college cafeterias shows an easy way to achieve this goal. Continue reading
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In a pilot study, people who changed their mealtimes lost on average twice the amount of body fat compared to the control group, despite not consciously restricting their caloric intake. Continue reading
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It’s back to school time, and to get the school year off to a good start kids need not only school supplies and enough sleep – they need the right foods to fuel their studies. Continue reading
Thanks, Anna!
1 reply
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A group of heart experts studied the evidence, and debated trending nutrition controversies. Here's the latest on dairy, sugar, coffee, alcohol, mushrooms and hummus. Continue reading
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Are gene-based diet recommendations ready for prime time? Researchers set out to analyze all the relevant scientific studies and find the answer. Continue reading
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New studies provide further evidence that if you enjoy your coffee you can do so free of guilt – coffee is probably good for you, as long as you remember that coffee, at its essence, is a calorie free, unsweetened drink. Continue reading
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“You’re eating for two” is often interpreted as “eat twice as much” which is, admittedly, more catchy and convenient than “you should eat healthy, gain some weight but not too much (and not too little)”. Unfortunately, excessive weight gain in pregnancy isn't just hard to lose, it may have a lasting effect on the child’s weight and health. Continue reading
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The average individual greenhouse gases generated weekly from food spending in the US are similar to driving from New York City to Baltimore. Greenhouse gas emissions related to food production account for a fifth of all emissions in the US – as much as those produced by the entire US industrial activity. But the greenhouse gases generated by households vary enormously depending on food choices. Continue reading
Susan, thanks! You can subscribe (it's in the left column of the blog) sign up for my newsletter or my Twitter feed (@DrAyala)
1 reply
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A review of the scientific literature concludes that even if you don’t consume extra calories, and don’t gain weight, there are metabolic downsides to consuming soda and sugary drinks. Continue reading
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The college year is coming to an end and many first-year students will be dismayed to find that their clothes have gotten a bit tight. A new study tests how strategies from behavioral economics could help students make better food choices – without even trying. Continue reading