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Dr. Ayala
Pediatrician, artist, mom and serious home cook, blogs about nutrition and health
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You can help your body mediate inflammation through your food choices, but what if you still want that occasional burger with French fries? Can you make it less inflammatory by adding anti-inflammatory foods to the pro-inflammatory ones? Continue reading
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Weeks are turning into months, yet many of us are still under shelter-in-place and lock down orders. Physical distancing, unthinkable last year, is shaping into a new norm. These are strange and difficult times, but many of the people I talk to are surprised by how they’ve adapted; they sheepishly admit that amid the storm and collective suffering they’re feeling calm, healthy, even happy. What’s the secret? Continue reading
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Why aren’t people eating wholesome grains? Why is it that despite repeated recommendations to eat at least half of total grains (and at least 3 ounces) as whole grains fewer than 10 percent of Americans do so? Continue reading
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Stay-at-home orders make food preparation a necessity, but it seems like what we’re longing for is more than a satiating meal, we want to bake bread. Why do we derive such pleasure from kneading dough, seeing it rise and tearing its crackly crust? Continue reading
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A few reports interpret the booming sales of processed and packaged foods as the reversal of the healthy trends. This is highly unlikely. We’re more likely to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic with a renewed respect for healthy habits, for good food, and for the very many people who feed us. Continue reading
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Infectious diseases have always been around, but it takes a new scary one to once again become aware of microbial threats -- the new coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak is our wakeup call. Learning wellness lessons from this outbreak can be the silver lining of living through these turbulent times. Continue reading
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In both distracted and mindless eating people are eating while doing something else, and the food is secondary, and although used interchangeably, they're not the same. Continue reading
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Healthy aging is in your hands and in your plate. Healthy diets don’t just add years – they add healthy ones. Continue reading
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Contradictory information about diet and food is obviously confusing, but sometimes media overload by itself erodes people's confidence in important nutritional recommendations and leads to poor decisions Continue reading
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It’s a new year, a good time to improve upon old habits, but most resolutions are hard to keep, because resolve is in short supply. Instead, I suggest picking a goal that will enhance your life and elevate your sense of wellbeing almost straightaway. Continue reading
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This holiday season, in the spirit of self care, look for foods and eating habits that give comfort, inner calm and health. Continue reading
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Can an old practice – which has re-emerged as the latest health and fitness trend – of giving your digestive system a rest, be the key to sustainable weight loss? Continue reading
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Excessive gratitude has no known side effects, but Thanksgiving overeating is a concern that’s on many people’s mind. Is holiday weight gain myth or fact? Continue reading
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Why aren’t people excited about fruits and vegetables? Could it be because we’ve pushed fruits and veggies as good-for-you chores? Are we marketing veggies all wrong? Continue reading
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One of the pleasures of Halloween is that on and around this day kids are out and about, walking from home to home, trick-or-treating. They fill the streets. Other days of the year, not so much. Why's that? and does it matter? Continue reading
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Does being optimally hydrated make a difference? A new study examines how variations in fluid intake affect kids' ability to think and learn. Continue reading
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There are many compelling reasons to exercise, so don’t read this title as an excuse to not to work out as hard and as often as you can – exercise is super important. But exercise on its own – without reducing caloric intake – results in less than expected weight loss. Here's why. Continue reading
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The recent plant-based trend is fueled by the meatless burger revolution. Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger's products look and taste like meat, and enable people to eat a vegan burger with little sacrifice, which is good news on many levels, but are these products really delivering on the plant-based promise of health? Continue reading
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A few weeks ago WW, previously known as Weight Watchers, launched an app called Kurbo, intended to help kids (as young as 8 years old) and teens “Reach a healthy weight”. Should kids diet? What are the risks? Continue reading
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How can parents create good vegetable-eating habits? How do you get young kids to like vegetables and eat them out of choice, without a struggle? Research suggests what really works. Continue reading
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Plants, just like us humans, are teeming with bacteria, fungi and viruses that support and interact with them, and organic food may have superior and more diverse microbiome. Continue reading
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We want our appliances to run efficiently. Our body, on the other hand, we’d like to run inefficiently and waste excess energy.Brown fat opens that possibility, and certain foods appear to boost brown fat. Continue reading
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Living in greener cities is associated with better health: it lowers the risk of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, asthma, anxiety and early death. A new study finds the minimal dose of green needed for wellbeing. Continue reading
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Bigger portions make people overeat, that’s already well established. Portions can grow in two ways, however: they can grow in size, or by increasing the number of units in the serving. Does increasing the volume of the food have the same effect as increasing the number of units? Continue reading
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People on an ultra processed diet ate an average of 500 calories more than they did on an unprocessed diet each day, that led to about 2 pounds of weight gain in 2 weeks. On an unprocessed diet people lost about 2 pounds in two weeks. Continue reading