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James Mayes
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You can also check out TwitCleaner - Si has been honing the algorithms there for a couple of years now and picks up on at least half of the Twitter crimes you refer to! I wrote about them in 2010 here, and caught up on the latest news over coffee last week!! http://musingsfromsussex.com/2010/06/25/twitter-follower-analysis/
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For the Liam Neeson quote, I'm strangely reminded of an in-house recruiting manager who wrote an awesome Dear John letter to agencies last year...
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I saw one once of a bloke whose face I couldn't really make out because it was covered in Social Media logos... :)
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Hey Peter - thanks for the mention, always appreciated. You'll be pleased to know we've got this down to 30 seconds now (http://www.bravenewtalent.com/create-talent-community). But of course, we're talking about a quick start to get a profile up and running. Building a community which delivers value is clearly an ongoing commitment. Your commentary is prescient though, and precisely something we're working closely with customers on. Who cares how it works? We do. We want to make it better, continuously. We've had some stats come back this year which make for great reading - demonstrating a reduction in the number of interviews required, an increase in the percentage of offers accepted, etc. We'll be releasing more detail in due course - keep watching!
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I'd give this a Plus1, but it's not available here yet! Just a RT then! Nice round-up Andy.
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Could be. Though some of the dividends you see JobBoards declare can't leave much for reinvestment or acquisition...
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Pretty much on the money Andy. You go further than my last post on the topic, by also roping in the Job boards - but I'd agree with your prediction there too. My take was more around RPO & niche agency, placing the squeeze on the middle ground. I'd say we'll see further job-board fragmentation in the short term though, as new specialists continue to come to market for particular niches, based on cheap job board tech - then being acquired by players like JobSite, TotalJobs, in search of new audiences and niche penetration. My post on the topic is http://jmay.es/iuiGyS - for those interested.
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I'm sure your empathetic approach is second to none!
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It seems commentary so far has been around what BNT can show and demonstrate, in the same way that a job board might. I'd suggest the BNT model so far is more akin to a tech startup - building brand recognition (sometimes based on vapour-ware), getting the right names interested... actual ground-breaking stuff to be delivered further down the line once the original visionary has nailed the right investment. I've seen companies deliver some wonderful stuff in a very short space of time, only to implode shortly after (bad operational management, inappropriate investors, technology changes, take yer pick), yet other companies deliver very little in the early years, only to subsequently thrive. Course, this is only guesswork on my part - but if I'm anywhere near the mark, I'm guessing Peter's additional publicity does BNT no harm at all ;-)
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I'd also suggest the original targeting of the campaign was somewhat wide of the mark if it showed the advert to you.
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I've got no history with anyone involved in the IoR, nor have I had any direct contact with them. What I see so far: - A fast-growing group on LinkedIn, suggesting a decent level of market interest - A website that offers no details, with press releases which are lightweight at best - An approach to Social Media which appears to favour either no engagement (Twitter) or heavily moderated engagement (LinkedIn) - The emergence of several fake profiles both on blogs and on LinkedIn So where does my interest lie now? Mostly thinking that this is pointless and / or a wasted opportunity. The industry has a number of professional bodies at the moment, but the rush to the new LinkedIn Group suggests there are a decent number of people who do not feel adequately catered for. However, the IoR already has too many questions surrounding it's methods, formation, registration and, in some posts I've seen, legality. When wishing to raise the game, this is not, in any way, a sound foundation to build on. As a certain Dragon might say "If you think I'm going to waste my children's inheritance on this joke, you're funnier than your own PR. I'm out".
Personally, I'm for it (for appropriately design/creative roles) - but not for the reasons touched on so far. A while back, I got involved in a debate about whether a company should look at your Facebook profile as part of the screening process. My view on that is that if they do, and decide not to hire me as a result, they're probably not the kind of company I could have had a happy and open working relationship with anyway. The same applies for designers & creatives here. If you're open enough to want to try and represent yourself via a non-traditional CV, the employer you're going to be happiest with is probably the one who is open to reviewing non-traditional CV's. Sure, it's a risk - but I think it's a great way for candidates to turn the tables and actually screen out inappropriate employers. After all, you don't want any job. You want the right job.
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Cheer Andy. I find it easy to listen and tweet at the same time, though a netbook sure makes it easier than on a mobile. The part where I think Glenn really shines is where a panel or presentation hits the deadzone. He has an ability to use the backchannel to pull through and continue tweeting useful points, or cast back over earlier sessions in the day and offer his thoughts on certain aspects. As they say in radio, Dead Air is a terrible thing - and that's precisely what Glenn manages to avoid.
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Having tried my hand at live-tweeting (unofficially only) I can indeed confirm Glenn makes it look easier than it is. Kudos for dragging an ancient profession bang up to date! I've got a way to go before my event output comes close....!
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Can I add to this... the people who send EVERY tweet to Facebook. Use Selective Tweets, or #fb in a similar way to the above - otherwise, it just becomes noise.
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A fine call judges, Lee's has been a must-read blog for me since I first discovered.
Cracking post Andy and a great project. The original post went up on Raak's blog - it's worth checking that one, because the second comment is a direct response from Klout's CEO. You can find it here: http://jmay.es/eEKX0m
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On my Twitter page, I use the link to a space on my blog where I explain how I use Twitter, who I follow and what I want out of the experience. I've had a number of new followers say that they found it really helpful! Turns out your Twitter guidelines and mine aren't all that different.
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Ahh, the master of the obvious. Needs saying sometimes though. As with anything you might ever spend time and/or money on - make sure the basics are right if you're going to invest in shiny extras! As one of my old mentors used to say - no point chroming the bumper if the transmission's about to drop out.
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Not so much an acronym, but I did love the recent description recently of UGC sites as "mullet sites" - in reference to the 80's haircut.... because they're all, like, business in the front and partaaaay at the back, dude! http://bit.ly/dzD4Bc
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Liking your point about attendees needing to change - but therein lies an area for a conference organiser to distinguish themselves. Many events I've attended deliver an e-ticket in advance and occasionally, a delegate pack on arrival. The delegate pack rarely makes mention of the backchannel, and even if it does, it doesn't give the uninitiated time to adjust. However, a guide pack delivered electronically a week in advance, tuned to the novice - that could be quite powerful. A crib-guide to the hashtags for the event, a guide to those blogging about it in advance (pre-reading, if you like), a guide to good twitter clients for mobiles for those new to the technology, LinkedIn profiles for the key speakers + their Twitter handles. All would help your attendees get more from the event and therefore reflect well on you for future events. After all, everyone needs to differentiate in a crowded market - I can't be the only one thinking this ain't rocket science...
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