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Javame
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Hi Michael, just wondering which blog post you were reading, mainly because I felt called i by reading yours, were you reading mine? http://the-arm.com/two-years-of-programmer-anarchy/index.html/. Shortly my main current takes on the 'programmer anarchy' are: - it depends on the context, on the project, on the people (sounds obvious, I know) - reality checks are important: I'd go and talk with the famous anarchists, most of them would probably show you tests, story cards, old code and not so micro services The thing I still love the most about the Programmer Anarchy concept is that it has a great appeal not only the developers community, it's a cultural shift, for years I've seen failing tentatives of improving an organisation, the anarchy in theory brushes off all the managers and simplify the process/organisation structure.
Iterations are useless, or, at least, useless with an experienced, committed agile team. In a less experienced team they should remember the weekly targets, however in a team pulling stories from the wall rather than pushing stories to the devs iterations are just a waste. Some manager may need to track the velocity, that can be hidden to the team, no need to communicate team speed, values of the story points or current iteration target, the team has to release features not points, the team doesn't have to burn down iterations burn down charts, the team has to produce quality software. I never got the way too long spring monthly iterations, I don't see the point of two weeks iterations (still too long to get an heartbeat), I was ok with flexible weekly iterations (just for tracking, no wall reset, no planning, no usual zealot activities). Some teams use micro-iterations, day iterations or half a day, pure madness. Iterations are muda, they require quite some time from the team to get setup, tracked and followed and they add very little value.
Toggle Commented Apr 26, 2010 on Zeno-Length Iterations at Michael Feathers
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Apr 25, 2010