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Jill Konrath
White Bear Lake, MN
Recent Activity
Bob -- Funny that you bring up the ebook. I haven't even looked at it yet. That's what happens when a company bugs me. Tom -- You're right. It should be a CEO issue. How a company relates to you during their lead generation initiatives is indicative of how they'll treat you later.
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Fred -- Some companies do it right. I like what you said about IDG Connect. I have the same experience with HubSpot. I've downloaded tons of stuff from them and they know me. And, after two years, I'm actually becoming a customer shortly. So slowly nurturing people does pay off -- especially if they're downloading info that's not totally relevant to making a buying decision today. Bruce -- Totally agree with you re: the 9 question letter. At that point, I felt totally stalked.
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You're absolutely right, Trish! Companies need to start looking at what they're doing from the recipient's point of view if they want to be successful with this.
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Hey all! Again, glad you like the post. Greg, you summed it up well with "Do. Don't Tell." Peter, I love the term "sales renaissance." I think I'll start using it. Also, I think people have always been wrong with rejection. If we're experiencing it, we should always figure out what we're doing to create it. And, then we should figure out how to eliminate it entirely. Pekka, you are so right that we need to take a few steps back. It helps us ensure our understanding and also shows that we want to propose the right step.
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Hey Jinan, Adetayo & Stone, Glad you're liking this post. It's a fresh approach that can yield amazing returns. Also, here's the link to Stone's recent post which he references above: http://dreamlandinteractive.com/2011/01/its-just-not-that-hard In it, he shares lots of good links that got me clicking! Jill
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Thanks for the excellent review of SNAP Selling. In today's crazy-busy world, it is so difficult for sellers to capture and keep the attention of frazzled prospects. They have so little time and they're being pulled in a 100 directions all at once. My goal in writing the book was to give sellers the tools they need to succeed in this challenging business environment. What we learned before is no longer effective. Hopefully when people read it, they'll walk away with numerous fresh ideas they can use immediately. And, more importantly, they'll see the opportunities that exist for them to stand out from the crowd and make a huge impact. Jill Konrath Author, SNAP Selling & Selling to Big Companies www.snapselling.com
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Thanks so much for sharing the news and letting people know about the SNAP Selling resources on my website. With much appreciation! Jill
Excellent article! You make a ton of great points about why salespeople are struggling today. At the core is a lack of personal accountability. I've worked with numerous companies whose salespeople don't know anything about Sales 2.0 tools, who won't read books unless they get reimbursed and have no desire to upgrade their skills. As they cost merrily along, they're fast becoming dinosaurs. But they don't even know it and neither do their bosses. They're just hoping to meet their numbers - which clearly gets harder and harder each year. On the other hand, I've worked with young, aggressive companies who have created a culture of learning. The future of our economy lies with these organizations. I'd bet on their success any day! P.S. And thanks for including me in your "masters of success." I am honored.
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Thanks Cynthia, Alan & Chris. I appreciate you adding your insights to the discussion. My goal in writing the article was to make people think. Too often we're just on cruise control in our sales and don't even consider options. I absolutely do believe in talking about budget. But at the earlier stages, this might be in the form of education instead of an open-ended question. Case in point: When my husband bought me my diamond engagement ring, we'd decided to spend X amount. However, after the good jeweler educated us about the four F's and how to tell a quality diamond, we ended up spending twice as much. So had the jeweler asked our budget initially, he would have gotten a much smaller sale. Again, the key is WHEN to pop the question and HOW you do it versus IF you do it. But that requires thinking and too many of us are on autopilot!
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Thanks everyone for the great comments so far - and I'd like to add a few more of my own ... - Anup: My contact, the SVP of US sales, reported to the executive team in a different country. They weren't willing to invest in training because revenue was down. Period. End of discussion. Personally I didn't even pursue it because I have better prospects who "get" the value I bring. - Nigel: I'm already seeing a turnaround this year. My business is way up. But, I am also seeing companies who are in the early stages of their death spiral. Things will only get tougher for them in the upcoming years. - Bill: Great ideas! If I had more time, I would implement them!!! - Mark: Amen re: the head honchos contributing to the problem. It's like they get fixated on the data, while the opportunities are slipping away. - Steve: I agree 100%. It makes no sense. As Ben Franklin would say, "They're penny wise, but pound foolish." - Christian: I would LOVE, LOVE, LOVE to read that article. Whoever wrote it is a person after my own heart. - Andy: That link with the message is painful to listen to - and, unfortunately, that's what the majority of salespeople sound like on the phone. A big OUCH!
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Mar 15, 2010
@Chad: Thanks for the great interview as well as the insightful commentary. Here are my thoughts re the topics brought up by @anup's and @cody's - As an individual, you can start a blog with a focus on the key issues, objectives and challenges facing your targeted customers. You do not have to blog as a salesperson representing the firm. My daughter has done this very successfully at www.getfreshminds.com. Her interest in innnovation. She works for an innovation company. But she doesn't write about it. However, she is developing a personal brand and it's been very beneficial to her professionally. - Re content development: I'm not sure that's the best use of a salesperson's time, especially if it is not their natural skill and talent. However, you can create content by writing some very short posts that link to articles, white papers, webinars, etc. that your prospects would be interested in. Over the last few years, I've discovered that you don't have to create all the content. Think of yourself as someone who continually brings good resources to your reader. That in itself is valuable.
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Good advice Jim. It's important to integrate all this info on the decision maker everything else you know about the account.
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Thanks for including me on your list. Minnesota is a hotbed of sales training excellence - and has been for the past 20 years. Everyone on your list is someone whose expertise I admire.
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