This is Joanne Bourne's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Joanne Bourne's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Joanne Bourne
Recent Activity
The whole question of how we see colors is an interesting one. An artist might have 300 words to describe shades of blue and be able to distinguish one from the other consistently and precisely. I have maybe 20 words. Does this mean I "see" fewer colors? Remember fewer colors? Form concepts and opinions in a less subtle way about colors? Hmmm ... I think I need another cup of tea.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I think historical authors need to know a bit generally about how English was used in the era they write in. It's the same way a contemporary writer would be aware of differences in current spoken English. The exact date of word origins -- this isn't going to matter to a reader.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
That green ... I suppose it is "pastel green" when you get right down to it ... is just a dreadful shade. It looks so unhealthy and unnatural. I hang prisms in my windows and scatter rainbows all over the room. I am just hokey like that.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I know. It always confused me too. Primrose vulgaris (Common primrose) is most often pale yellow in the grassy fields and pastures of England and that's what people would have come across in the Regency. Primroses are also white and pink in nature, but yellow is the expected shade. It may be we more frequently see the non-yellow color variations in garden shops because they are snazzier.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
How wonderful to live in a pla ce full of color. I've been lucky enough to live in the tropics and the trees and flowers were always full of delight for me. Now I'm more temperately based and I'm kinda in the process of throwing random rose bushes all over my front yard. (This is accomplished over several years planting, you understand.) There is nothing, absolutely nothing, more important than messing around in gardens.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I have this theory that a good deal of education is teaching kids to give the expected answer instead of ... well ... the creative answer or the expert answer or anything else not in the book.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I like red as an energizing color. Wakes you up when you wear it. And I appreciate that professional women can now use a red suit as power clothing. Makes women pop out of the crowd in serious important settings. OTOH, do not don a red shirt while serving on the USS Enterprise.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I love that "brandgul" I will have to start calling oranges that. They will appreciate the compliment. Oranges are somewhat jealous of red peppers who get all the good press.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
Dreary weather is good weather. Rain tends to bring out the introspective and creative in me. I should probably go live on the Oregon coast. Or possibly Mt. Waialeale on Kauai in Hawaii, which gets 460 inches of rain a year. One of the rainiest spots on earth.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I am puzzled and dismayed by the current predilection for gray walls. I have managed to avoid both naval service and prison, but not prison- or battleship- gray walls, alas.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I will rather indelicately bring up caca-dauphin from the court of Marie Antoinette.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I hate even hearing about it. Though I will admit I'm quite fond of split pea soup. I still maintain London fog isn't that color, but maybe it was in Vi ctorian times.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
A much warmer and more subtle gem ...
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
Interesting that digital paint colors would be different from applied paints. ... maybe because colors as shown by the c omputer come to us with light shining behind them ...?
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
The relationship between language perception and the words used to denote colors is kinda interesting. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue%E2%80%93green_distinction_in_language The thing linguists get up to ...
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I keep thinking "official green" dates to some well-meaning person deciding - people like being in the forests and fields, - forests and fields are green - therefore institutional walls should be green but not really paying any attention to WHICH green. I've always mentally referred to this as "Landlady green."
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
The yellow-green point of the spectrum is not one of my favorites either. I'm a more bright, fresh lettuce green person. Or the deep brown-shadowed green of ferns.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
That's cool. There's a lot of psychological research into the color palette for makeup and clothing and how it makes us feel. Lots of artists figuring this out in portraits, too. No reason science and art shouldn't come to our aid and be useful.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
I think that green is supposed to be soothing. (jo shrugs) I understand they did a psychological experiment where they painted police holding cells pink. They discovered the prisoners were less obstreperous. From this I concluded pink holding cells startled and terrified hardened criminals who were convinced they'd gotten some questionable illegal drugs or wandered into an alternate reality
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Colorful Regency at Word Wenches
1 reply
Image
So what did they call that color before the Fourteenth Century? Apparently geoluhread. As in, "Wow. Love your geoluhread i-pod!" Geoluhread would roughly translate as yellow-red and I am sure we are all grateful to Sanskrit for its intervention into what would have been a dismal shade with a long name. Did folks think of orange as a distinct color, or was it just part of red? Roses, rubies, blood - were red. Pumpkins - also red. When does a hue split off and become a different color? Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Word Wenches
44
Cooool. I envy you.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Ask A Wench - Memorable Trips at Word Wenches
1 reply
Arcadia National Park may be the most beautiful place in the world. I bring back rocks from some of the places that are special to me, and I have an Arcadia rock.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Ask A Wench - Memorable Trips at Word Wenches
1 reply
There's a great difference between fresh coconut and the grated and dried (and, I think, sweetened) sort. Different beasts that just don't taste the same. I like many of the spicy, what-some-folks-think-of-as-exotic cookeries, but I'm picking from the cuisines with which I'm familiar. So I like most of the Indian regional subspecialties from Afghan to Nepal, but not Thai or Japanese. It may possibly have to do with whether fish sauce is part of the flavoring. And 90% of what I eat is plain cooking. I don't expect to get tired of the joyful subtlety of ordinary fresh vegetables anytime soon
Toggle Commented Aug 23, 2020 on A Loverly Bunch of Coconuts at Word Wenches
1 reply
Almond extract is one of those spices -- if it is a spice -- I keep on the shelf. I don't use it often. In cookies and pastries sometimes. It doesn't taste much like almonds to me. I mean, it's not unpleasant, but it just isn't very almondy. But then, I frequently eat "smokehouse almonds" so I may not even know what they taste like plain.
Toggle Commented Aug 23, 2020 on A Loverly Bunch of Coconuts at Word Wenches
1 reply
I've had to depend on Googl Advanced Book Search and it is sometimes impossible and unreliable to use. I think they mess with it from time to time, trying to monetize it. Or maybe somebody on top hires his son-in-law to run things for a while and the eager new guy makes everything wonky. My guess is Australians have always had a close and friendly relationship with coconuts, them being handy in the trees. I discover I do not know nearly as much about Australia/British trade in the Eighteenth Century as I should.
Toggle Commented Aug 23, 2020 on A Loverly Bunch of Coconuts at Word Wenches
1 reply