This is Joanne Bourne's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Joanne Bourne's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Joanne Bourne
Recent Activity
*g*
1 reply
Sounds interesting. I see this is a Patricia Wrede book. She's a great author. This is YA, for all you folks who enjoy settling back with a YA book. https://www.amazon.com/Sorcery-Cecelia-Enchanted-Chocolate-Novels-ebook/dp/B007ZI07BM/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=Sorcery+%26+Cecelia&qid=1558030899&s=books&sr=1-3
1 reply
There's a lot of difference between brands and kinds of hot chocolate. I'd recommend trying some of the Mexician hot chocolate recipes, just because they are so very different from American chocolate.
1 reply
Curl papers ... or curl cloths. You're the second person who's opined this. But, I dunnoh. Tight tight little curls over the first half of the head and the rest left straight?
1 reply
The funny thing is, both cacao beans and coffee beans taste bitter in their original form.Not so attractive that one would go chomping on them in their natural state. The story with coffee beans is that shepherds (or camel herders) noticed their flocks getting active and lively after feeding on coffee beans and decided to try them out themselves. As I say, a story. I suspect that in their bitter natural state they were tried out as medicine and perked the sick fellow -- or the initiate seeking interesting visions -- right up. The rest is history. Jonathan Swift: "He was a bold man that first ate an oyster." I suppose the same is rue for cacao beans.
1 reply
Not merely like Georgian times. Like Aztec times. *g* I have drunk Abuelita brand and found it good. I imagine that are others that would be interesting. I wonder if there's a brand that uses the whole bean.
1 reply
It sounds lovely, especially the side handle. What swagger to ride sidesaddle with your chocolate pot.
1 reply
So few of us have antique chocolate pots. Itis a definite lack in modern life. You are adventurous in your hot chocolate drinking. I congratulate you. What fun.
1 reply
I think colonial Williamsburg -- and perhaps other re-enactment sites -- do the whole preparation process as a demonstration. They may sell olde tyme chocolate in packets. It was a long involved process. One good reason to buy the drink in your local coffee house or tavern. But then, in 1800, everything was a long process and laborious. Labor was relatively cheap and imported products were inherently expensive. Coffee, tea, and chocolate were for the upper classes to drink after the working folk had prepared them.
1 reply
I like milk IN things, or as a baking ingredient. I don't just sit down and drink a glass of milk. As I say above, recipes for hot chocolate don't necessarily include milk. Sometimes milk was added from a pitcher at the table. I imagine there were lots of Regency folk who drank their chocolate very much the way we drink black coffee.
1 reply
You obviously know exactly how and when to enjoy hot chocolate. Georgian hot chocolate was often made nondairy. Pulverized and finely ground almonds or pistachios cooked with the chocolate would essentially be adding nut milk to the mixture. There might have been more dairy sensitives in 1800 than we realized.
1 reply
Hot chocolate and whipped cream is like Laurel and Hardy, Burns and Allen, Expansion of the Money Supply and Inflation ...
1 reply
I know dried milk is after the Regency. It's the technological advancement that allowed milk chocolate. Yeah dried milk, says I. Dutching cocoa dates to 1828, which puts it just after the Regency. Extended Regency, as it were. I would not want to write 1828 because of the leg-o-mutton sleeves, which I consider hideous.
1 reply
I thought so too, but then, the mom's hair has a couple similar ribbony things. And they're not wearing informal morning dress. Undress. Which I assume they would be if they were still in hair papers. Look at how the mom is quietly reaching out to steady her daughter's saucer. And the girl's hand up on the edge of the table. So heart-warming.
1 reply
I picture them as one of the exotic deer species. Steenbok maybe. Or gerenuks.
1 reply
Maybe we should have specialized pots with stirrers in them. Mexican hot chocolate, which is a more complex delight and can be thick employs pretty, hand-carved molinillos which are a minor art form in themselves. Historically, Georgian coffee was often made with brandy. Cool idea, says I.
1 reply
Image
Hot chocolate wandered into England by way of Spain and France. Like its fellow travellers, coffee and tea, hot chocolate loaded up on sugar, seduced the populace with pretty delicate cups, and snuggled into the British Isles to make itself at home. Hot chocolate started out both as a tonic sold in pharmacies and simultaneously a trendy brew served in exclusive cafés.Like most exotic new foods it was an expensive delicacy reserved for the upper crust and the prosperous middle classes. An Eighteenth Century Yuppie drink, as it were. Continue reading
Posted May 13, 2019 at Word Wenches
32
Small university town. Yes. Pretty intelligent coffee shop.
1 reply
We'll be confronted with the wreck of Notre Dame, in every photo of Paris from now on. Not something we can ignore. And not something that can be razed to the ground and replaced with another structure. Just as the Victorian response to a crumbling structure tells us a lot about the Victorians, OUr response is going to tell the future a lot about us. We'll have a long time to think about this.
1 reply
Interesting take on this. And how funny the tour guide had his immediate, personal, and idiosyncratic take on what was truly important. I would like to see the folks who make the decisions on the restoration at least consulting the folks actually use it for the purpose for which it was intended.
1 reply
Reims Cathedral is just lovely. Remarkable stained glass everywhere. I was in Reims only once. Went to see the total eclipse there some years back. Toured the oldest parts of the town on foot and saw the church while I was waiting for the sun to disappear. Getting two or three bites at the apple, as it were.
1 reply
I can see how the rebuilding will go. Ten years to get the basic structures back in place. Thirty years arguing over how they should deal with the windows.
1 reply
I never got to do that. I would have enjoyed it so much.
1 reply
That's so sad. And yet, such an example of continuity and hope.
1 reply
I live near Monticello in Virginia and many of my friends have volunteered there. It's a continuing struggle to keep stuff from falling apart and to make the history a living experience for visitors. Nothing like a Medieval cathedral, of course, but on our own small scale ...
1 reply