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Joanne Bourne
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I've noticed that free range chicken seem to lay eggs with harder shells than store bought chickens. Is it recycled shells, I wonder?
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I understand Silkys are very beautiful but I don't think I've ever seen one. It occurs to me that caponing chickens maybe might be one of those lost country arts. There might have been a guy who came around all the farms and fixed everybody's young cocks .., the way there was a specialized pig slaughterer and specialized thatchers and so on.
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I had not known this about guinea hens. I agree with her that they earn their keep if they keep the tick population under control.
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It is indeed. I got the name wrong, though, and had to go back to change it. *blush*
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I would agree with you, in terms of chickens not being good pet material. But then, I have had several friends who found them fascinating and affectionate and gave them names and told stories about them. I don't know whether this means the world is full of wonderful chickens or I am blessed with odd friends.
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I have not quite worked up the energy to set up a fish tank. I'm tempted, though.
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Roosters are there, among other things, to protect the hens and chicks. Get everybody into the coop at night. Kill those snakes! Chase away that rat! Give warning of the evil fox! They are Serious Birds, with a job to do. It is not all beer and skittles being a rooster.
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You have left me with so many Balkan chicken questions. Mostly, I want to be reassured that the arrested chicken was well cared for and returned home triumphant.
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We forget how much a treat eggs used to be, even in the lifetime of those now living. Now, of course, they may be the cheapest complete protein going. We take them for granted.
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Aaaww ... I don't know that I have every actually stroked a live chicken. I like to think I've tried all sorts of new experiences, but I seem to have missed this one.
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I have heard of this before, that Australian have ordinary local birds as pets but can't leave the country with them because, protected. Where I live, we're not allowed to keep animals that occur naturally in the local environment as pets. So I could keep a big old turtle native to Florida, but not one of the Virginia turtles. Necessary and good, I suppose, but it does seem odd.
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Roger would seem to be an athlete of sorts, no? I hope he keeps everybody happy.
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I can see grandmommy collecting the eggs and calculating the chickenfeed to marketable egg equation. "No egg again today. That's it for you, Mrs Fluffybutt," she murmurs.
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Let us assume they went to a chicken rescue organization and were re-homed to good families. I would like to know what makes somebody pro-chick and the next guy chicken-neutral and another fellow violently anti-chick. I can make a guess as to who's gonna like dogs as opposed to cats. I'd get very slightly better than random results. Chickens? No clue.
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Ameraucanas are the blue-egg ones, right? I had a friend who kept these and sold the eggs to restaurants. She liked All her chickens, even the difficult ones.
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I agree with you about birds. They don't don't seem ... well ... fond of the owners somehow. But I can't keep birds because I am allergic to feathers so I really don't know. I don't know whether chicken eggs were seasonal because the breeds are different, or because it's now possible to keep the lighting right. Or because we can afford to feed them grain in the winter ...
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Joanna here, talking chicken history, with special attention to chickens in the Regency. By this I mean historical eating chickens rather than show chickens or pet chickens, though I imagine some Regency folks kept chickens and became very fond of them. I will talk about pet chickens later. In the Regency -- in most times and places -- chickens were “women’s livestock,” a minor and cozily domestic part of the farm economy, kept by the woman of the house for “egg money,” fed thriftily with scraps and garden bugs and free-range foraging. I don't know about most places and times, but in the US, in the C20, the money a woman made from her chickens was hers to spend as she would. Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Word Wenches
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Peanut button on -- in my case it's bagel -- is one of those breakfasts that "feel" traditional. Such a logical combination. WHY isn't it enshrined in Southern cooking? I've found the grind-yer-own peanut butter works nicely if I have to go completely and utterly sugar free, but I'll admit I prefer the commercial sort. I never did believe the "eggs are evil" mantra. I'm not wildly fond of them, however. I think it's because eggs are difficult to cook right. An if you get them wrong, they're tasteless and leathery.
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I was actually talking to an Australian about vegemite, fellow Wench Anne Gracie. I've never seen it in the US. Admittedly, I've never looked for it. I've seen bovril, though.
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I will take your advice and hunt down those short stories. *g* (jo puts it on her list)
Toggle Commented Aug 1, 2019 on What We're Reading — July 2019 at Word Wenches
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The "overcoming abuse" theme was why I was hesitant to approach the Alpha and Omega series. I like it now that I'm reading it. Well done.
Toggle Commented Aug 1, 2019 on What We're Reading — July 2019 at Word Wenches
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I have read the Alpha and Omega books. Took me a while to work up the courage to open them. I read Storm Cursed and am still digesting it. A bit different from some of the others. I'll have to get hold of the Shifting Shadows book. Haven't yet.
Toggle Commented Aug 1, 2019 on What We're Reading — July 2019 at Word Wenches
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You're just going down a checklist of super fine writers. Two of them are new to me, Sherman Alexie and Jennifer Ryan. I'll have to buckle down and read them.
Toggle Commented Aug 1, 2019 on What We're Reading — July 2019 at Word Wenches
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I love buffets. First off, I like having somebody else cook the food. Second, I get to try a lot of different things without committing to buying a whole meal's worth. And third, I get to eat just a mouthful of ten different things, which strikes me as cool. But I do eat more than I otherwise would.
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Thank ye kindly. I, too, tend to graze the refrigerator for leftovers for breakfast. I have cold pizza this morning, for instance. *g*
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