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Johnm Watkins
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"Any hypothesis about "importing violence from the home country" has to account for Australia." Australia was mainly settled in the 19th century, so it would have imported a later version of British culture than America. In fact, Botany Bay was established when it was no longer possible to sentence people to transportation to the American colonies. Quite a few were sent to the colonies for sedition. Wonder why they rebelled?
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For a country located in the Americas, the United states has a relatively low murder rate. Canada and Chile are the exceptions. I suspect the issue is cultural, but but I don't know how much of a role slavery played in it. One thing that has happened with colonization is that some cultural aspects are preserved from the time of colonization. I would look to the murder rate in the mother country at the time the country was colonized. The murder rate in Europe in the middle ages was extremely high, and dropped quite a bit during the time the Americas were being settled. http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/23/us/historical-study-of-homicide-and-cities-surprises-the-experts.html I would surmise that as Europe shifted from an honor culture to a dignity culture, homicides fell, and the old cultural patterns were preserved to some extent in the new world.
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First of all, Kellner did not reveal that people were spanking kids, he revealed that they were molesting them, which is quite a different thing. Second, I have to question the premise here. Yes, many men beat their wives, and society did too little about it, but the notion that molesting children and beating wives was viewed as a property crime may apply to some communities, certainly not to all. I am quite certain my grandfathers never beat their wives. They were taught that it was dishonorable to hit a woman, and in any case, they loved their wives and certainly did not see them as property. In my great grandparent's generation the only one I knew was my Scotch great grandmother, and I can assure you, no one would dare treat her as property. As to the legal status of child molesters, they seem to have been prosecuted under rape laws just as they would have been if they'd raped an adult, except that they were more likely to be prosecuted. And short of prosecution, children could be taken from parents who the community thought were abusing or neglecting them. As early as 1642, Massachusetts had a law for removing a child from a home. http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/publishing/insights_law_society/ChildProtectionHistory.authcheckdam.pdf
Toggle Commented Nov 18, 2014 on Words I never heard in the Bible at Obsidian Wings
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Well, I've done some mousing around on the internet, and it looks like at least one collaborator, Gaston Quien, was prosecuted after WW I. He turned over people at a Belgian nursing school who were helping allied soldiers. So perhaps WW II is not so unique in this respect.
Toggle Commented Nov 22, 2013 on Was World War II a civil war? at Obsidian Wings
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It strikes me that Germany's brutal occupation of Belgium in WW I would be a good test for this. I know of no prosecution of collaborators with the Germans following the war, even though the rape of Belgium was about as brutal as anything that country had ever sustained. The Germans weren't trying to change the way of life in Belgium, they were just frustrated that the Belgian army had stymied their plans to walk through and take Paris.
Toggle Commented Nov 21, 2013 on Was World War II a civil war? at Obsidian Wings
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In some European wars, collaboration was not an option. When the British took over Calais, Edward III's men persuaded him to spare the lives of its citizens, but they were expelled from the city, which was repopulated with English people. In some of the conflicts that made up the 100-years war, resistance by a town resulted in its citizens being put to the sword. In such circumstances, collaboration might be seen as understandable.
Toggle Commented Nov 21, 2013 on Was World War II a civil war? at Obsidian Wings
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Spot on. The most politically potent science of the current age is agnotology, the science of creating ignorance. It pretty much got started with the tobacco companies, and has been transferred to other areas of political debate. http://booksellersvsbestsellers.blogspot.com/2010/12/agnotology-science-of-our-time.html
Toggle Commented Aug 22, 2013 on 'Welcome to the Age of Denial' at Economist's View
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Aug 22, 2013