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Julio
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So what does that make the centrists?
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Links (11/9/18) at Economist's View
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Well, at least this one is not (yet) Soros's fault.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Links (11/9/18) at Economist's View
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Wrote the above before reading anne's following reposts, which make the same points about "deception".
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Links (11/9/18) at Economist's View
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"The satellite images suggest that the North has been engaged in a great deception..." What deception? We keep hearing about the North Koreans' "deceptions", "cheating", etc. when in fact for two generations of leaders they have been quite consistent. What is the deception when there is no agreement? The only deception is Trump's, which claims to have obtained some agreement or concession, when in fact there is none. Kim's father, in the 90's, had agreed to denuclearization, but never got the promised quid pro quo. People have argued endlessly as to who failed to live up to their promises. Since then, the NK expressed policy has been that we cannot trust any promises, we need to arm ourselves with a sufficient deterrent (i.e. nuclear), and once we have that we will be willing to talk. Which is exactly what they have done. Amazing how on this particular issue, our leaders (both parties) can make even the NK dictators look sane.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Links (11/9/18) at Economist's View
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With your endless ad hominems, you had already become mostly boring. Now, you have become thoroughly offensive.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Links (11/9/18) at Economist's View
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See? And here you thought Trumponomics could not help the workers.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Links (11/9/18) at Economist's View
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Coincidentally (or not) an article in The Intercept https://theintercept.com/2018/11/10/democrats-should-remember-al-gore-won-florida-in-2000-but-lost-the-presidency-with-a-preemptive-surrender/ calls for that kind of activism to demand that every vote be counted.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Links (11/9/18) at Economist's View
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"China has come down tremendously. Tremendously." As long as they're poorer, we're winning, so all is well.
Toggle Commented Nov 9, 2018 on Links (11/7/18) at Economist's View
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The urban-rural cultural divide is very significant Not surprisingly, it is reflected in partisan preferences. (And, BTW, this is not just a US phenomenon). City dwellers like me are more aware of and more reliant on public services, and on collective action in general. Rural dwellers are much more self-reliant for their day-to-day needs. As an example, I have never owned a gun; for my safety at home, I rely on an alarm system, the police being nearby, and neighbors to discourage prowlers. My daughter and son-in-law live in an isolated rural house, and they own a gun. Similarly, I own a small car and hardly drive it, much preferring to walk, bicycle, or use public transportation; they own a truck, which they actually need because they cannot get deliveries. That sense of self-reliance leads some of my acquaintances to vote Republican because they believe in less government. The advantages of collective action through the government are more abstract to them.
Toggle Commented Nov 9, 2018 on Links (11/7/18) at Economist's View
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Yes. Because we know since "lock her up" that investigations are just a personal toy that "we" in the White House can use, or not, at will.
Toggle Commented Nov 8, 2018 on Links (11/7/18) at Economist's View
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Very good, and well-written. I especially liked "For Lincoln, the rigidly moral, the proudly sanctimonious, represented a profound evil. Such people were narcissists rather than moralists. They cared less about succeeding than about sneering. But worse, these were tedious people, unable to laugh at the human condition, unable to laugh at themselves, and therefore not fully human."
Toggle Commented Nov 7, 2018 on Links (11/5/18) at Economist's View
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Yes. Just focus on one transition to a better world: getting money and its corruption out of politics. You have to avoid a plutocrat-controlled press, and revolving-door jobs, and bribes to the intellectual class in the form of grants and sinecures, and... So you end up with an authoritarian people's state, authoritarian in at least the sense that it does not treat private property as holy. Of course the transition involves much suffering and dislocation, and nobody wants that. The tainted pablum is not a fools' concoction, it dilutes the poison raisins.
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2018 on Links (11/5/18) at Economist's View
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At my age, unfortunately this IS my real hair.
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2018 on Links (11/5/18) at Economist's View
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Wait, wait. Split a Prime?
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2018 on Links (11/5/18) at Economist's View
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I should have been more precise: for any specific endeavor or occupation right now, there is talk about how it "will always require human input" and the like. For any specific activity, that has been false and will continue to be. That doesn't mean all work (i.e. way to contribute something of value, which then can be exchanged for things of value produced by others) will be done by machines. There will always be things for humans to do, because we will find those things and value them. I am mostly arguing against the idea in the article that you will always need man-machine partnerships, with the implication that there are certain things that machines can never do on their own. I used to think that "high-touch", high contact work (e.g. massage, the sex industry, eldercare, childcare) were different but with advances in robotics and material sciences I am not so sure.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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Exactly. Note how the article went from "...hackers — believed to be from Russia..." (believed by whom? and on what basis?) to "...dozens of new attempts by foreign hackers..." (no longer "believed" to be foreign, I guess).
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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This just in: Presidential pundits were thrown into disarray today by the sudden rise of third-party candidate Mr. Ai Not Hee to the top of the standings after his announcement that he is running for the presidency in 2020. In a simulated three-way race, Mr. Not Hee, a son of Burmese immigrants, would easily defeat Mr. Trump as well as any Democratic challenger. At the announcement, the candidate responded to all questions by bowing, smiling, and shaking reporter's hands while repeating "Ai Not Hee". President Trump's percentages in the polls dropped by .03%. Mr. Trump tweeted that the candidate "cannot speak English" and is "proof of why we need to REVOKE BIRTHRIGHT CITIZENSHIP!!". Prospective Democratic voters however appear to be switching preference in record numbers, claiming the candidate "expressed everything I feel about the current political situation". More as the story develops.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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In the development of chess computers, there was a time when a combination of computer + human player was stronger than either individually, by quite a bit. That lasted about ten years, then computers became much stronger than all humans, even the world champion. Throughout the history of AI (about 70 years of research, 40 of consumer applications) there have been attempts to "explain" why humans would not be replaced by the machines. I have stopped believing any of them.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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:-)
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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The Parrot Party.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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Yes, but either way the importing gorilla has power over the small exporter.
Toggle Commented Nov 3, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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Two Americas. The owners are already mostly "foreign".
Toggle Commented Nov 3, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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"If indeed the ultimate outcome is a huge share of domestic real assets owned and or controlled by foreign capitalists Why should wage class Americans care That question deserves an answer" Exactly. And long before October Revolution levels, it might be easier to convince people that our government needs to represent us against them, act as a counterweight to their power.
Toggle Commented Nov 3, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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It's Goldstein! Lock him up!
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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Jack Benny update: "Your money or your life!" "What's the difference?"
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2018 on Links (10/31/18) at Economist's View
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