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Kdwilliams
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Posted at All Access as well... Your latest big idea is nothing more than shrugged defeatism. Also, how do you answer your big "commercial free" idea when it comes to spoken word radio? Play songs and betray their formats? Next, Pandora won't find itself in the same boat as radio concerning spots because - for one of many reasons - their spot loads aren't nowhere near as high as radio's. The Clear Channel style of playing more spots in less time hasn't really solved the problem for radio on that issue. Add to that, they're smaller than our industry. Their responsibilities, purposes and issues are not aligned with ours. Never will be. Your point from your blog, "Rates may go up and down, but the ad world views radio as a viable marketing medium and always has." is not based in reality. It's not because we're more viable than any other medium. We're simply cheaper for the value. And don't get me started on remnants. Another point from your blog, "For Pandora, making money with their stream is essentially their only revenue source. It’s their inventory, their bread and butter, the only viable way they can ever make good on their IPO." Well duh, that's their purpose along with covering their performance fees. It's a business built on an algorithm. Their Internet radio station started as way for them to prove the viability of that development. They don't have the overhead radio has. They don't have to worry about rent, maintenance cost, rank and file salaries and benefits, engineering costs, promotions and the other pesky things we do. For them, it's the player, apps, algorithm, license fees, legal, sales and the library. That's it. Also, if you recall, one of the main reasons they started a revenue stream is to pay for the cost of paying performance fees. If you recall they - and a lot other Internet radio stations - were scared that would have to go under because the fees were initially so high. BTW, the NAB is trying to find a compromise so that we will be paying performance fees too. How does that figure into your "commercial free" stream? Finally, your "As for consultants and my digital team, I'm not going to get into a debate with you over their value. The radio industry votes every day on those questions by keeping us in business, publishing our articles and think pieces, and supporting our industry events like the Conclave's Summer School and our annual Summit." is the McDonald's argument - billions of people eating here can't be wrong. However, that doesn't means it's good food and that doesn't mean your team is knowledgeable. Further, my commentaries and responses are solely based on what you and your digital representative have proposed in this community. From the myriad of evidence that's out there, you and your team member - that post here at All Access - are wrong and too on the surface in your valuations. For example, your give up and go commercial free streaming isn't a solution. Thanks for the feedback.Your latest big idea is nothing more than shrugged defeatism. Also, how do you answer your big "commercial free" idea when it comes to spoken word radio? Play songs and betray their formats? Next, Pandora won't find itself in the same boat as radio concerning spots because - for one of many reasons - their spot loads aren't nowhere near as high as radio's. The Clear Channel style of playing more spots in less time hasn't really solved the problem for radio on that issue. Add to that, they're smaller than our industry. Their responsibilities, purposes and issues are not aligned with ours. Never will be. Your point from your blog, "Rates may go up and down, but the ad world views radio as a viable marketing medium and always has." is not based in reality. It's not because we're more viable than any other medium. We're simply cheaper for the value. And don't get me started on remnants. Another point from your blog, "For Pandora, making money with their stream is essentially their only revenue source. It’s their inventory, their bread and butter, the only viable way they can ever make good on their IPO." Well duh, that's their purpose along with covering their performance fees. It's a business built on an algorithm. Their Internet radio station started as way for them to prove the viability of that development. They don't have the overhead radio has. They don't have to worry about rent, maintenance cost, rank and file salaries and benefits, engineering costs, promotions and the other pesky things we do. For them, it's the player, apps, algorithm, license fees, legal, sales and the library. That's it. Also, if you recall, one of the main reasons they started a revenue stream is to pay for the cost of paying performance fees. If you recall they - and a lot other Internet radio stations - were scared that would have to go under because the fees were initially so high. BTW, the NAB is trying to find a compromise so that we will be paying performance fees too. How does that figure into your "commercial free" stream? Finally, your "As for consultants and my digital team, I'm not going to get into a debate with you over their value. The radio industry votes every day on those questions by keeping us in business, publishing our articles and think pieces, and supporting our industry events like the Conclave's Summer School and our annual Summit." is the McDonald's argument - billions of people eating here can't be wrong. However, that doesn't means it's good food and that doesn't mean your team is knowledgeable. Further, my commentaries and responses are solely based on what you and your digital representative have proposed in this community. From the myriad of evidence that's out there, you and your team member - that post here at All Access - are wrong and too on the surface in your valuations. For example, your give up and go commercial free streaming isn't a solution. Thanks for the feedback.
Toggle Commented Aug 2, 2011 on No Sale 2 at JacoBlog - Jacobs Media's Blog
We haven't courted the youth market in some time. There is a lost generation of consumers who either don't bother with us for many reasons or listen to us incrementally. All lusting for the young aside, how do you combat this forward? What steps can and should be done? The answer to these questions lies in if the radio industry is willing to go into rebuilding mode with younger and more progressive thought and management leadership.
Toggle Commented Feb 25, 2011 on Young Lust 2 at JacoBlog - Jacobs Media's Blog
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Feb 25, 2011