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Kristin Espinasse
France
Recent Activity
Hi Katia, you can indeed put clothing in the compost pile, but it needs to be 100 natural (linen or cotton), non-dyed. It does take time to break down...so these days I recycle it (as rags for cleaning) instead of feeding it to my compost pile. That said, it could work well as a weed suppressor, much like cardboard: set it over a patch of bindweed and then add soil on top and plant what you want!
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Thanks for sharing some humor, Laura. This is wonderful. Havent seen it at church. 😂
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Hi, Linda. I love Ruth Stout and have her books. Have you seen this YouTube video about her? https://youtu.be/GNU8IJzRHZk
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Thank you, In-May. And I love the story of you French name. 💕
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Hi, Susie, You had me smiling, imagining all those wrinkled prune in the tree. Yes, I meant plums.
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Marcia, Friends gave us a great tip, which we used back at the vineyard: buy an extra large plastic garbage can with a twist top. Then drill holes all around it. Put your kitchen scraps inside and, every so often, turn it on its side and roll it (helps the contents to break down). Ive gone back to this system, in addition to giving my garden treats directly from my cutting board. 🙂
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Thank you, Gail. I will try this! I have gotten several avocado plants out of my compost. The trees may be growing somewhere back at our vineyard. 🙂
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Hi, Maureen. I didnt know that about poppies. Thanks for the info and very kind words! Hugs back to you.
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Thanks for catching that one, Judi. Off to update the post. Also, re underwear, 100 percent cotton, non dyed! 😂
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Merci, Claudette! The tree is fixed. 🙂
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Thanks, Audrey, for pointing that out. I didn't mean to make a pun. It was a happy accident.
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Here is where a themed photo usually appears, above the word of the day. But you don't want to look at potato peelings do you? Enjoy, instead, a picture of our garden from springtime 2018. Strangely, all the red coquelicots, or poppies, did not return in 2019.... Today's Word: épluchure Une épluchure, c'est un morceau de peau d’un légume ou d’un fruit A peeling is a bit of skin from a vegetable or fruit Exercises in French Phonics - A little gem of a book for French pronunciation. Order here. A DAY IN A FRENCH LIFE by Kristi Espinasse When we moved to La Ciotat two years ago, one of our first tasks was to find a place to recycle all of our kitchen scraps, or déchets de cuisine. But in the years since we began composting, rarely have we actually gotten to use the finished product! I can't remember collecting more than a few buckets, or seaux, of the "black gold" in all the time I have painstakingly set aside rotten tomatoes, épluchures, apple cores, coffee grounds, tea bags, even my husband's underpants and socks! De plus, I regularly go through the kitchen poubelle, plucking out orange peels and... Continue reading
Posted Nov 6, 2019 at FRENCH WORD-A-DAY
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Thank you all for the dearest words which, as Natalia might say, wrap me in hugs. 💕💕
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This is wonderful and an honor. Thank you, Mike!
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Your poem is the perfect fit for today's theme. Thank you, Herm!
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Writing desk. The orchids were a gift from Mom (pictured below). Exercises in French Phonics - A little gem of a book for French pronunciation. Order here. Coucou, Before this month comes to a close, help me celebrate un jalon. In October of 2002, I posted this journal's first mot du jour. It was a meaningful term at that: bosser. Looking back over 17 years of blogging from France, I should have a lot to talk to you about today. Instead, I'm sitting here staring at a blank page. And each time I try to begin a sentence, my Mom's whistling dispels the thought. (Jules is one floor below, outside on her patio, feeding the tourterelles.) Rather than struggle, I'm going to relax and listen to the birds. I'm going to celebrate this milestone in the best way I know how, by letting go. (That is French for lâcher prise.) I will "see you" next week with many more French words and photos: my own way of whistling an ongoing tune about this French life. Amicalement, Kristi FRENCH VOCABULARY coucou = hi there, yoo-hoo un jalon = a milestone mot du jour = word of the day bosser = to... Continue reading
Posted Oct 31, 2019 at FRENCH WORD-A-DAY
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Thanks, Lindsay, They are called bonbonnes, and they formerly held wine (not our own). I love them, too.
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Thanks, Marianne! We had a lot of activities going on when we lived at those two vineyards, and it is good to realize that even here, living in town, there is still much to do and see and learn in and from our garden (or yard, as we called it back home). Yes, I believe Jean-Marc will find a way to continue beekeeping.
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Thanks,David. Something seemed off when I wrote that, but I could not figure it out. Shoo indeed! Off to update the post.
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Hi, Ian. Well that was a happy accident (and a typo. I meant gathered, and not gattered). So thank YOU for teaching me a new word. 🙂
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Yesterday, harvesting our first honey from La Ciotat, I saw a swarm of hornets in one of our abandoned hives. (Listen to Jean-Marc read in French, below.) Today's Word: le frelon : hornet, Vespa Click here to listen to Jean-Marc's sentence: Hier, en récoltant notre premier miel de La Ciotat, j'ai vu un essaim de frelons dans une de nos ruches abandonnée. Gift Idea: Scratch off World Map poster - a great gift for your favorite adventurer to plan a trip on the world map wall poster then record their journey. Order here. Exercises in French Phonics - A little gem of a book for French pronunciation. Order here. A DAY IN A FRENCH LIFE by Kristi Espinasse This morning I noticed giant wasps flying head-on into the bay window in our living room. Ce sont des kamikazes! I said to Jean-Marc, who was busy warming honeycombs on the stovetop, helping the miel to drip into the pan below. My husband had salvaged the honey from his abandoned ruches in our backyard. Les frelons asiatique--invading killer hornets (they eat honey bees!) must've smelled something cooking and were desperately trying to reach the honey. We had shut the sliding glass doors... Continue reading
Posted Oct 29, 2019 at FRENCH WORD-A-DAY
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Thanks, Jean! Going to fix that now...
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Many thanks, David, for your kind words and for the helpful edit. On my way to fix it now. Mom's toe is much better. Merci.🙂
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Chapter 9 of our vineyard memoir is online now. Mike, reading along from South Africa, writes: "For me, quite the most enjoyable chapter so far, because it gives insight into your personal migration over the years." Merci, Mike! For all of us, the pursuit of a dream, whether life in France or a satisfying relationship, involves an emotional migration of the ego and soul. This message is at the heart of our book, available here. TODAY'S WORD: ORAGEUX : stormy, tempestuous AUDIO: Listen to Jean-Marc read his sentence in French L'épisode Méditerranéen en cours dans le sud de la France a provoqué un temps orageux hier soir sur La Ciotat.The Mediterranean episode underway in the south of France caused stormy weather last night on La Ciotat. Mediterranean episode = a particular meteorological phenomenon around the Mediterranean (Wikipedia) A DAY IN A FRENCH LIFE by Kristi Espinasse When we heard the storms were coming Mom suggested we cancel her appointment chez le podologue. But because her big toe--her gros orteil--was in pain again (that ingrown toenail!) I didn't want to put off the rendez-vous. It'll be okay, I assured Mom. We don't have too far to drive.... We left our one... Continue reading
Posted Oct 25, 2019 at FRENCH WORD-A-DAY
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Cynthia, I really like your translation and think it fits so well! Thanks.
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