This is Susan Finerty's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Susan Finerty's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Susan Finerty
Vernon Hills, IL
Author of "Master the Matrix: 7 Essentials for Getting Things Done in Complex Organizations," Consultant, Speaker and Coach
Interests: leadership, change, influence, communication, relationships, career, matrix management, being strategic,strategic thinking
Recent Activity
I arrived in London last Sunday to find the London Marathon taking place—what a treat and how appropriate! London was my first stop on a three-country, six workshop, seven day tour around the world—my own personal marathon! Like the marathon, I anticipated my first few miles (or in this case,... Continue reading
Image
Last week marked the beginning the "Master the Matrix" global initiative! This first stop was a series of workshops for a client in Copenhagen. Continue reading
Image
So when we see symptoms of it, we get frustrated and take it as an indictment on us, our particular boss or company. It’s none of those things—it’s just the reality of work today. We can’t job hop away from it, we have to learn how to do it well. So I was looking at where you see just as many specialists as we do in our workplace, and where they really make it work. And I realized movie sets are a great example. Continue reading
Image
Do you know the story of the Chinese Bamboo? If you plant the seed and water and fertilize that seed, in the first year, you will soon see…nothing. The second year of vigilant watering and fertilizing will yield…nothing Year three—same fertilizing and watering and the same...nothing. In year four, you... Continue reading
Image
Fast forward to April 20, 2012. I am sitting in a conference of amazing women leaders in Chicago. The theme was resilience. Truth be told, I wasn't feeling especially resilient that day. This "starting up a new business thing" is a bit of a roller coaster and that day I was on a downturn. The panel was talking about what helps them "bounce back" from a setback. One of the overwhelming themes was consistent, even premature and unbridled, optimism. Continue reading
Image
There are always going to be problems, decisions, conflicts, issues that are bigger than you. You will have to take them up the food chain. But in doing so, you can be an escalator (escalating, compounding the issue) or an elevator (bring it up to a whole new level). For obvious reasons, we'll focus on elevating here. Continue reading
Image
I've written about my own reinvention--which was literally triggered by a clicking noise 18 months ago. But this got me thinking about the clicking noises we all hear and the choices we make to ignore them, turn the radio up louder or take them for what they truly are--messages deserving of our attention. Continue reading
Image
So this year, as I enter the marketing phase of this book project, my “just ask” expands to something bolder around BE COURAGEOUS. That phrase just begs to be in ALL CAPS, doesn’t it? Maybe that’s my resolution: Be in ALL CAPS. Continue reading
Influence is a hot topic. The #1 most asked question I get as a consultant, coach and instructor is, "How can I get people whom I have no authority over to do what I need them to do?" Continue reading
Image
This blog will be THE place for ordering the book, signing up for webinars and getting additional ideas and tools. Book will be available for purchase on this webiste on Monday, January 23! Download the first chapter FREE here Attend the Book Launch Celebration, Monday January 30 Continue reading
Posted Nov 21, 2011 at Master the Matrix
So, here’s how it goes. You are moving fast and you assume: They know. They don’t know. Somebody else already told them. They don’t need to know. I’m the one to tell them. I know how to tell them (or it doesn’t matter how I tell them). I know the whole picture. Continue reading
Image
Too often I hear people say that that their partner isn’t partnering, so they themselves are unable to partner, or feel it would be a waste of time to attempt to partner. This is the biggest mistake you can make. If you want to improve or build a partrnership at work, don’t wait for them. Continue reading
Image
For the past 12 months I have been immersed in researching, writing and now marketing a book on matrix organizations--those complex maze-like apparatuses that so many of us have to work through to get things done these days. The book was a test of my own matrix of support and resources. Here's what I learned. Continue reading
Image
This is the fourth in a series of posts on partnerships at work, although this is focused on matrix roles, partnerships and the mindsets behind them are crucial in all types of work roles. The five mindsets are: Be deliberate Remember the human Be open Be willing Don’t wait for... Continue reading
Image
This is the third in a series of posts on partnerships at work, although this is focused on matrix roles, partnerships and the mindsets behind them are crucial in all types of work roles. The five mindsets are: Be deliberate Remember the human Be open Be willing Don’t wait for... Continue reading
Image
This is the second in a series of posts on partnerships at work, although this is focused on matrix roles, partnerships and the mindsets behind them are crucial in all types of work roles. The five mindsets are: Be deliberate Remember the human Be open Be willing Don’t wait for... Continue reading
Image
This is the first in a series of posts on building partnerships at work. Although it is aimed at those in matrix roles, the importance of partnerships and the mindset behind building them is crucial for any type of role. Do you remember your childhood best friend? That friendship grew... Continue reading
Image
Its no great secret that the higher you get in an organization, the broader your organizational sights need to be set. You are expected to be up on a broader set of information, and make decisions based on that broad view. You are expected to connect the happenings on one end to those on the other, see the ripple effects across a wide body of water, not just in your little puddle. Continue reading
I am no math whiz, but I still remember what a lowest common denominator is—it is the lowest number that two numbers both go into, or something like that. I would propose that for matrix roles, you need to continually seek the lowest common denominator, organizationally. Continue reading
Kevan--I think you are right on that with additional lines come additional meetings that quickly become all consuming. When I say "meetings matter" that mean they matter so much, you shouldn't waste them on trivial matters. First step in a great meeting is attempting to talk yourself out of it!
@Lawerence Carson: Thanks for your perspective. I absolutely agree that meetings are symptoms. I compare them to a wedding, where all the family's dysfunction is on full, public display! Meetings can call out an individual leader's skill (or lack of) as well as organizational issues. For instance, a meeting of nodding heads who promptly leave the meeting and do the opposite of what was agreed upon, is probably indicative not just of that singular meeting, but the organization's culture. I go back to my mantra on this--meeting matter, they really, really do." And if they matter, you will take time to not only get good at them but to listen to them and what they are telling you about the broader project or organization.
Image
It is incumbent upon leaders, managers, and associates to learn how to optimally utilize the Matrix as a tool in their arsenal. But it is not much of a tool if you don’t teach people how to use it. Just like youth coaches can upgrade their ability to read defenses, employees need to upgrade their performance levels in matrix organizations. Continue reading
Image
If matrix roles are the traffic cops of converging organizational intersections, then meetings are the tool that helps avoid collisions and produce results that bring together divergent goals, opinions and experiences. Continue reading
@MCH. This is a great meeting process. Interested in reviewing my chapter on meetings? I think you might have some great perspective!