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LeeJarvis
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It is funny how electronic music has almost always been the opposite - hit singles and smash remixes by pseudonyms and unheard of artists that blow up and then they vanish. Remixes have not only been a great tool too help blur the lines between fickle sub-sub-genre-blinkered DJs ("I only play soulful urban house music" etc) and pverlap into slightly different markets, but it is also a wonderful creative outlet; I love remixing, and encourage artists to mash-up, bootleg, re-edit, re-visit and re-write whenever they feel the urge. It gets the creative juices flowing! ~Lee
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I mentioned this in another post, but it is relevant here also - I was an intern for about six months at an indie dance music record label in London, and made sacrifices in order to bend around the no/low income factor. I knew it would be an opportunity to gain skills, knowledge and experience of the music industry. I now work for a company that offers paid jobs, low pay part time freelance work, full time careers and interships in the music industry. I'm sure there is some irony in there somewhere. I'm guessing no one will mind if I link to the websites, seeing as the general consensus here is that any way to get a foot in the door is a positive thing. http://us.music-jobs.com/ http://uk.music-jobs.com/ (we're also establishing a base in other territories http://www.music-jobs.com/ for the full list) Lee J.
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I too worked for free at my first 'music industry' job. I was an intern for about six months at an indie dance music record label, and made sacrifices in order to bend around the no/low income factor, but I knew it would be a good move in order to gain skills, knowledge and experience of the industry. I now work for a company that offers jobs in the music industry! I'm sure there is some irony in there somewhere. I'm guessing no one will mind if I link to the websites, seeing as the general consensus here is that any way to get a foot in the door is a positive thing. http://us.music-jobs.com/ http://uk.music-jobs.com/ (we're also establishing a base in other territories http://www.music-jobs.com/ for the full list. If anyone would like more info please feel free to contact me) Lee J.
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This is spot on! Very well said, and I hope that a few artists and their 'managers' will take this as a wake up call :) Lee Jarvis.
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Who is Rosie O'Donnell? Never heard of her....
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In general, I agree that sales figures would rise - if singles were 25c and albums $1, it would be quick, cheap, and convenient for me to buy 10 albums a week, and try some 'risky' new bands that I've not heard before without being too disappointed. I believe it would decrease use of P2P sites too - for $1 it's not worth risking the infected / incomplete / poor quality files on those kinds of sites. I read about someone in the majors having the same viewpoint in a recent book - maybe it was Dickens - and it certainly opened my mind to the possibility. Not saying it will work for everyone or it will solve problems or raise major label profits, but certainly something that would open up my purchasing habits to include more digital albums (I'm a vinyl + CD junkie at heart.) Lee Jarvis.
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2010 on Should New Albums Cost $1? at hypebot
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Was this really from Rolling Stone? There is a wayward apostrophe and a lack of commas in "The kids swapping were like ten times more likely to buy CD's". Lee.
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I agree that if the reader is respected and it is made clear that the blog runs the label, then there is nothing wrong with continuing to push music to their readership. It's a bit like saying, "here's my music and other related music that I like". Also worth mentioning... 7", 12" and CASSETTES! There's definitely the niches there and I hope they can exploit them. Good luck!
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The way I see it, bars, restaurants, music venues and even your friendly neighbourhood dentist pay a fee in order to play music. Much a fuss is made about online streaming websites being ordered to pay a royalty fee, and so yes, radio stations should pay a fee also. I thought that they already do pay, no? If their listener figures are smaller, they pay less, surely? Lee J.
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When an artist starts out with earning no income from their music, they are quite happy to give it away for the exposure it may create. Obviously it is easier for a small band to offer a free mp3 and say "we may have lost a potential $1000" than it would be for Universal to do it with a Lady Gaga single and consider losing (potentially) a lot more. However, the idea of exposure still remains. Streaming can be a way for people to try out new artists without committing to a $15 album (of which, Universal made many, many terrible ones). As there is no way to measure the direct income derived from a person who streams two tracks, then goes to buy them from iTunes, and then pays $40 to see the artist in concert, it can be hard to judge. I would stick my neck out and say that it helps though. Lee Jarvis US Music Jobs
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I'd have to agree that Myspace will not reclaim their former audience. Much better tools have evolved for musicians to establish an audience, network, distribute and promote. There must be a very small percentage who can still use it efficiently as part of their online strategy. Lee J.
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Nov 20, 2009