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Midori
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Thanks, Bernice for your post on Charlie Montoya. I am always humbled by the long list of minors who worked under such difficult circumstances. But it's great when family members post remembrances of them here -- It makes it seem as if they are in some way still with us. Thanks again. Midori
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It is such a luxury to live along the Colorado Front Range, surrounded by beautiful high mountains, forests, rivers, and a wide diversity of flora and fauna. We had a great time at a recent family hike up Mt. Brainard,... Continue reading
Posted Aug 27, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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Feeling very excited to see the first of my revised novels about to go live in a Kindle Edition. It has been a long journey for me (with more than enough road blocks and frustrations along the way) but joyful... Continue reading
Posted Aug 1, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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I was about 12 when I discovered the basket of woolen embroidery threads and decided to create this charming unicorn. I remember thinking how wonderful it was to create such a creature -- and then, as life has it, I was drawn away to other activities and it sat for... Continue reading
Posted Jul 22, 2022 at Handwork and The Craft
Wow! My father was a gunner on a war ship -- and he was blown off his ship during a kamikaze attack. He drifted in the ocean with a handful of other wounded survivors for two days, just off the coast of Okinawa. He was, compared to most of the other sailors, quite small and short. His duffle bag weighed more than he did! But still, he was determined -- and he did serve in virtually every major battle in the war. His return to France and the battle at Normandy remained in his most important -- he wanted to free his family in Paris from the Occupation.
Toggle Commented May 24, 2022 on Emile as a Young Soldier at In the Labyrinth
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I love this photograph, and the lovely calm of the young woman. and yes, the beautiful beaded embroidery. My great great grandmother immigrated as a small child with her family from Sweden to Northern Wisconsin. They lived and farmed for... Continue reading
Posted May 18, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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My Jewish father was 16 when he fled Nazi Occupied France, and arrived in the US. At 17 he enlisted in the Navy and proceeded to serve in almost every major Naval battle field, including Normandy, where he fought to... Continue reading
Posted May 18, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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Weaving in a time of war and chaos...following Tolkien's ideas of sub-creation in difficult times: "“Why should a man be scorned if, finding himself in prison, he tries to get out and go home? Or if, when he cannot do... Continue reading
Posted May 18, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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It is wonderful to know that younger researchers in the area of African studies are still looking into my father Emile's work -- his photographs and his collection of recordings of musicians from many areas of West Africa, including Senegal... Continue reading
Posted Feb 28, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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When you find wonderful memories digging in your archives. How young we look. The internet has brought me a wonderful and unexpected gift in this awesome photograph from David Dyer-Bennet taken at the Fourth Street Fantasy Convention in 1987. This... Continue reading
Posted Feb 7, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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The relationship between cowboys and their horses is in someway an ancient tradition. Each man seeks to know his horse, to count on the horse for the cowboy's livelihood and at times, in the long cattle rides, for survival. But... Continue reading
Posted Feb 1, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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Years ago, when I was writing Flight of Michael McBride, I researched the unique language used by cowboys to describe their horses, their activities, and even the different phases of their lives. As a writer, how could I not be... Continue reading
Posted Feb 1, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
...with scars and a will to keep ongoing. I have had one bumpy ride this last year, and this year requires, I believe, the same stubborn fortitude that kept me going last year when I could barely stand. A triple... Continue reading
Posted Jan 7, 2022 at In the Labyrinth
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In Medieval books there is almost as much information in the margins as in the text. The art is another coded version of the text, one that if you know the language, visually expands the discussion. But how to read... Continue reading
Posted May 14, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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This is a wonderful thread -- first begun in 2018, with terrific authors like Marly Youmans, Mo Crow, and one of my favorite artists, Katherine Ace. It is a very open discussion on the intersection of our personal stories, and... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
I recently had a wonderful opportunity to meet with Monique Kountangni, who was interested in translating into French my essay "The Girl Without Arms," from Terri Windling's anthology, Surviving Childhood, Tor Books 1995. Monique is an accomplished translator and she... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
Katherine, I wonder sometimes if there isn't often a connection between a less than stellar childhood and a deep dive into the arts. I left home at 16, not because my parents were cruel or mean -- but because they had left me earlier. When I was five and my brother eight, we were eating cereal alone together, and my brother in all his eight year old wisdom turned to me and said, "now that you can pour your own cereal don't expect anything from our parents. We're on our own now." We used to say, it wasn't that they didn't love us, rather they loved themselves more. And while it was a most alienating childhood, and adolescence, I started writing even then, not to remake the world into something I lacked and desired, but because it was a world that belonged entirely to me and my own imagination. In order to graduate high school early (I had purchased a one way ticket to go to England) I had to write an essay on where I saw myself in the future. I wrote about 5 pages debating whether I wanted to be an actor or a writer. And then started laughing at the end of it, realizing that an actor would never waste so much time talking about acting, but a writer never stops writing about writing. Your white canvas, and my white sheet of paper. I am always stunned by where the work takes me, where the ideas arise, and the images, but it is one of the few things in my life that I trust will be there, arising out of seemingly nothing, and then quickly becoming all consuming. Even now, as I am revising my previously published works (always written in haste with a baby on my hip) I am constantly surprised by things I have written--as you say, divinely inspired and equally defiant.
Aargh, my internet is down and I can't reply as I would wish on my phone. I am hoping it will be resolved today.
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In the wake of the borders crossings now occurring, along with the tremendous dangers, particularly for young girls and women, I wanted to return to a novel that brilliantly describes and almost mythologizes such an under-taking. Here is the original... Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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“Traveling is a brutality. It forces you to trust strangers and to lose sight of all that familiar comfort of home and friends.You are constantly off balance. Nothing is yours except the essential things: air, sleep, dreams, sea, the sky... Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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I have been going back and forth, trying to decide which of my out of print novels to reissue after Hannah's Garden. The stand-alone novels seem easier, cleaner, less complicated, and were at least well edited. But how wondrous and... Continue reading
Posted Feb 9, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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I am finally catching up with my Christmas list and have finished the last pair of socks from a trio of socks for my daughter. I love the yarn as it is both earthy and watery, reminiscent of a Monet painting. And I am delighted by the approval of my... Continue reading
Posted Feb 8, 2021 at Handwork and The Craft
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This is an older post, but one that I love to revisit as a way to memorialize my father Emile's life and the journey he took to arrive in the United States, a Jewish teenager fleeing Nazi occupied France. In... Continue reading
Posted Jan 18, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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When you finish knitting a sock at your favorite bar and decide to celebrate.... Go Trident Bar and Grill, Tucson, AZ Continue reading
Posted Oct 28, 2020 at Handwork and The Craft