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Midori
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In Medieval books there is almost as much information in the margins as in the text. The art is another coded version of the text, one that if you know the language, visually expands the discussion. But how to read... Continue reading
Posted May 14, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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This is a wonderful thread -- first begun in 2018, with terrific authors like Marly Youmans, Mo Crow, and one of my favorite artists, Katherine Ace. It is a very open discussion on the intersection of our personal stories, and... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
I recently had a wonderful opportunity to meet with Monique Kountangni, who was interested in translating into French my essay "The Girl Without Arms," from Terri Windling's anthology, Surviving Childhood, Tor Books 1995. Monique is an accomplished translator and she... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
Katherine, I wonder sometimes if there isn't often a connection between a less than stellar childhood and a deep dive into the arts. I left home at 16, not because my parents were cruel or mean -- but because they had left me earlier. When I was five and my brother eight, we were eating cereal alone together, and my brother in all his eight year old wisdom turned to me and said, "now that you can pour your own cereal don't expect anything from our parents. We're on our own now." We used to say, it wasn't that they didn't love us, rather they loved themselves more. And while it was a most alienating childhood, and adolescence, I started writing even then, not to remake the world into something I lacked and desired, but because it was a world that belonged entirely to me and my own imagination. In order to graduate high school early (I had purchased a one way ticket to go to England) I had to write an essay on where I saw myself in the future. I wrote about 5 pages debating whether I wanted to be an actor or a writer. And then started laughing at the end of it, realizing that an actor would never waste so much time talking about acting, but a writer never stops writing about writing. Your white canvas, and my white sheet of paper. I am always stunned by where the work takes me, where the ideas arise, and the images, but it is one of the few things in my life that I trust will be there, arising out of seemingly nothing, and then quickly becoming all consuming. Even now, as I am revising my previously published works (always written in haste with a baby on my hip) I am constantly surprised by things I have written--as you say, divinely inspired and equally defiant.
Aargh, my internet is down and I can't reply as I would wish on my phone. I am hoping it will be resolved today.
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In the wake of the borders crossings now occurring, along with the tremendous dangers, particularly for young girls and women, I wanted to return to a novel that brilliantly describes and almost mythologizes such an under-taking. Here is the original... Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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“Traveling is a brutality. It forces you to trust strangers and to lose sight of all that familiar comfort of home and friends.You are constantly off balance. Nothing is yours except the essential things: air, sleep, dreams, sea, the sky... Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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I have been going back and forth, trying to decide which of my out of print novels to reissue after Hannah's Garden. The stand-alone novels seem easier, cleaner, less complicated, and were at least well edited. But how wondrous and... Continue reading
Posted Feb 9, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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I am finally catching up with my Christmas list and have finished the last pair of socks from a trio of socks for my daughter. I love the yarn as it is both earthy and watery, reminiscent of a Monet painting. And I am delighted by the approval of my... Continue reading
Posted Feb 8, 2021 at Handwork and The Craft
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This is an older post, but one that I love to revisit as a way to memorialize my father Emile's life and the journey he took to arrive in the United States, a Jewish teenager fleeing Nazi occupied France. In... Continue reading
Posted Jan 18, 2021 at In the Labyrinth
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When you finish knitting a sock at your favorite bar and decide to celebrate.... Go Trident Bar and Grill, Tucson, AZ Continue reading
Posted Oct 28, 2020 at Handwork and The Craft
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As the work on Hannah's Garden is getting finalized this month for release in November, I have also begun the work of re-issuing The Flight of Michael Michael, which will be published by Leaping Hart Press. Set in the late... Continue reading
Posted Oct 2, 2020 at In the Labyrinth
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Sometimes I find it so amazing to live here in Boulder, beneath the Flat Irons of the Rocky Mountains. Every morning there is always something extraordinary to see, and to be filled with wonderment. Sometimes it is the elk coming... Continue reading
Posted Oct 2, 2020 at In the Labyrinth
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Love this flamingo-colored yarn from Emjay Bailey. Lovely, non-pooling, riotous color. So cheerful Continue reading
Posted Sep 29, 2020 at Handwork and The Craft
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I am heading to the desert for a while and bringing new projects along....looking forward to the dry cool nights, and the stars high overhead. And then I found these fall beauties from Madeleine Tosh! Let's see how fast I can knit while trying to finish preparing a second novel... Continue reading
Posted Sep 22, 2020 at Handwork and The Craft
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I am heading to the desert for a while and bringing new projects along....looking forward to the dry cool nights, and the stars high overhead. And then I found these fall beauties from Madeleine Tosh! Let's see how fast I... Continue reading
Posted Sep 22, 2020 at In the Labyrinth
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I am happy to announce that Hannah's Garden is set to be re-released towards March 2021. It will appear in paperback and a kindle edition. And hopefully, after that LHP is looking to release an audio version. Here are some... Continue reading
Posted Sep 14, 2020 at In the Labyrinth
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A few photographs have surfaced of my grandfather, Pierre Menager's work. I am always charmed by his informal paintings...they have so life in them, and so little social distancing. A barn dance and a wedding...They make me happy these dark... Continue reading
Posted Jul 27, 2020 at In the Labyrinth
Hi Sharon, thanks for this! It was such a different time, wasn't it? I love my two small sculptures of a knitting woman and her husband. I also have a pair of sculpted pekineses Ole did for my grandmother.
Toggle Commented Jul 15, 2020 on The Primitive Art of Ole Olson at In the Labyrinth
I totally understand that kind of concern! This reminds me of yesterday's reading from 2 Kings 14-16A which offers hope for the future even when it seems impossible: Later Elisha asked, “Can something be done for her?” His servant Gehazi answered, “Yes! She has no son, and her husband is getting on in years.” Elisha said, “Call her.” When the woman had been called and stood at the door, Elisha promised, “This time next year you will be fondling a baby son.” I will add you and your family to my prayers this year. As for where the best place to live? Ah...I have to say Boulder is pretty darn beautiful. And yes, I crave the seasons, the changes, the colors, the rain...all of which doesn't happen in Tucson. But...I will be there for a few of the winter months (never thought I would be a snow bird!!) when it is gorgeous and cool in Tucson, and the sunsets spectacular. Plus, I miss good Mexican food! And my favorite bar and coffee shop!
Hahaha -- that's hilarious! It is such a remarkable union of food and culture and what food is intended to say about not only the individual, but the culture from which those signature dishes and comfort foods arise. What flavors do you love? How does what you grow and eat reflect the place, the world in which you live? How does what you eat also describe your relationship with those familial ancestors, the way you care for yourself, the way, as Proust so famously did, remember the family and the past. And now, I think I need to make some madeleines...seriously, I've made myself hungry for French soul food. (And funnily enough, my husband made a little pasta with olive-oil and butter to calm his stomach just yesterday! When in digestive doubt, return to the basics!
Toggle Commented Jun 26, 2020 on Plank'd and Research at In the Labyrinth
I remember being of two minds... relieved that we were freed up to go and do whatever we wanted...and then when grandchildren came, it was a call to return to the tribe-mind! Being and active part of that...we lived in Tucson for 12 years, until one day we just upped and moved to Boulder to be involved in the life of our children again, and their children. We still have our own adventures -- the hiking here in the mountains is thrilling and meeting up with a karate school for training at 9,000ft is literally breath-taking and fun. There's talk of building a homestead farm, of getting sheep, and garden beds full of vegetables, helping with homeschooling...it's crazy, but most pleasurable to contemplate, especially in this particularly painful and destructive time we are living in. Circling the wagons -- I suppose. But, I taught my five year granddaughter how to weave on a simple cardboard loom I made for her and now she wants me to teach her everything about textile-making. It's lovely as the grandchildren pull us forward into the future with them.
Hi Mark, to call someone in Sweden a "halibut" is an endearment I think because halibut traditionally is an important and favorite food among Swedes. It could be dried and salted and kept through the winter (long winters!) The French call a loved one a little cabbage. The Germans have quite a few as well, based on sausages and plum cakes. I think all cultures have versions of turning food items into expressions of "consuming" love. And Italians and food! yes, yes -- especially good food! How many different kinds of pasta there are! When I was researching "The Innamorati" I was living in Italy for a year. I had read for fun an Italianate novel written by two English women. Half way through the novel I realized that not one character in 100 pages had stopped to eat anything. I mentioned this to my Italian friend and she looked at me horrified, and said "not even pasta???"
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2020 on Plank'd and Research at In the Labyrinth
Fantastic! I love the conversations with your mother, as there is nothing better than passionately talking over food and recipes! My father was French and food examples abounded in his everyday conversations -- even in his translations of French-speaking African poetry and Swedish poetry. Food references were carefully calculated, so that the physical sense of the food image could translate from one country to another. An "over-ripe Camembert" with it's nuance of an off smell and too soft and squishy, became in English "a rotten tomato." The "halibut" (an affectionate term for a loved one) became something more familiar -- a lover, I think. I can't seem to find the poem in my papers! I would also recommend a small, but gorgeous book on food and art in the Renaissance: "Tastes and Temptations" by John Varriano. I've posted on him before in the blog -- but cream, raisins, and spices seem extravagant, you should read the descriptions of whole peacock, stuffed and cooked and reassembled to look as if it were about to fly off the plate!
Toggle Commented Jun 22, 2020 on Plank'd and Research at In the Labyrinth