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Michael Doyle
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Posters on here detest Major over Masstricht, yet admire David Davis as a government whip whipped MPs in to the lobby to vote for it. Fuzzy logic.
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I enjoy the reading the very creative re-writing of history that takes place on this site. Mrs Thatcher was the PM who entered the ERM, not Major. Mrs Thatcher signed us up to the single European act, not Major. Major won the a general election with the biggest popular vote share since the war, not Thatcher. Major made us in the 90s a country more at ease with itself, left the incoming Labour government with the best economic inheritance any new government could hope for. Posterity will be kind to John Major, he secured an opt-out of the euro. Mrs Thatcher would have negotiated a deal at Maastricht just like Majors. That was 20 years ago, about time people got over it, we have more pressing matters at this current time such as the state of out economy and the youth unemployment numbers which are a national disgrace.
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As someone who was once quite sympathetic to the Cameron modernisation project, I am now becoming increasingly disconcerted with the direction the party is taking. Did the party need to become more inclusive regarding ethnic minorities, homosexuals and young people; yes. But did it need to become a clone of Blairism? NO! these policies regarding universities other examples of social engineering are not what the Conservative party stand for. And why have we abandoned our principles on sound money and fiscal discipline?
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Is Osborne advocating state intervention ala British Leyland? I didn't see the speech, so could someone clarify. If he is I only ask: When will the state learn it cannot run any business?
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Believe it when i see it, every PM since Heath has been pro-eu, and I don't see that changing anytime soon.
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As anyone with a smidgen of economic knowledge knows, these are not 'cuts.' Osborne is merely slowing the rate of spending. The cuts need to be deeper and more substantial, National debt is projected to peak at 1.4 trillion. Some legacy we are bequeathing the next generation. Regarding tax cuts; cutting the 50p rate would be political suicide at the moment, especially with the revelations of big city donors giving millions to the party. And how do we fund cuts in taxation? Put it on the credit card? Add it to the national debt?
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As a student from a very low income family, I find this policy patronising and a real slap in the face. I don't want to be accepted at a university, because a bunch of Fabians have a guilt concise. I hope Michael Gove sticks to his guns and continue his reform programme. My mother was the first person in our family to go to university, she passed her 11+ and succeeded on merit, she was born into a family who were dirt poor. Back then the conservative party actually stood for true meritocracy. Now it stands for wooley social engineering!
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Sack Osborne as election co-ordinator, he should be focusing 110% on the economy. Besides hes an awful strategist as was shown by the 2010 GE results. Sack Warsi and put David Davis in as chairman.
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In the age bracket 21-30, you will find few if any Conservative voters. This is quite disturbing, considering it was the last Government who left them with a huge debt which could potentially impoverish themselves and their children and grandchildren. I think it is perceived as not being trendy to be a Conservative, sad that image takes precedence over what a political party stands for in policy terms. I don't think this is just a Conservative problem as the title suggests. I think the electorate is fed up with all political parties hence the decline of party membership year after year.
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2011 on 42% would never vote Conservative at thetorydiary
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The economic illiteracy of the population is astounding. Most think that when GO promises to eliminate the deficit in 5 years, the debt crisis will be over and it will be business as usual. The national debt is the real issue here, look past the treasurys fiddling of the numbers and include off balance sheet liabilities. The national debt is close to 5 trillion pounds, most of those economic illiterates are under 30 like myself. Yet don't seem to realise that they have been royally screwed over. GO has to run a 3.5% surplus from 2015 onwards just to start the process of balancing the books. The big economic idea your looking for George is simple: increase the cuts in spending and begin serious delevraging now!
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This may have already been mentioned, but the truth is that the government is powerless to get growth going with both fiscal and monetary policy tools. The debt overhang is huge and especially in the private sphere, we are the most indebted country in the developed world and given that we are a consumption based economy, growth will be anemic for years. Re:cuts, What cuts!! On current projections, public expenditure will be 37 billon higher than at the beginning of this parliament. And sitting on the back benches we have the best economic mind being wasted, John Redwood would be the best chancellor, the only MP who has taken the Bank to task for it's ridiculously loose monetary policy pre crash and there inept handling of this slump.
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I thought you were on the traditional right of the party, i would argue Boris is not on the traditional right but is more of a traditional one nation Conservative.
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What many seem to forget is that Cameron needed an 8% swing just to get a majority of 1 on the current boundaries. Given the expansion of the New Labour client state over the past 13 years, the total apathy towards the Tories in the north and Scotland and the fact that Cameron reminded voters to much of Blair all contributed to his failiure to win an overall majority. A minority government would have spooked the markets at a time when our budget deficit was too high and we were in the economic danger zone.
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If no one can understand why the Conservative party is seen as toxic by the voters than you haven't A. Been on the doorstep for a few years. B. Have very little to no contact with the under 30s in this country. C.Think its okay to have large swathes of this country with little to no Conservative representation. The North and Scotland spring to mind. D.And think that the party was right to tear itself apart during the last 5 years of the Major Government, which destroyed the electorates belief in the traditional Conservative strengths of competent Government and economic competency. I'm under 30 and there are very few people i know in my age group who believe like i do that the Conservative party's economic policy and belief in sound money benefit the people more then Labour's tax and spend nonsense. Every one i know under 30 thinks the Conservatives only favour the rich. There is an image problem and to say there isn't could have long-term problems for the party in attracting new members.
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The EU is at a crossroads. Further integration or break up? Germans are no longer interested in the 'project.' I see the whole thing coming to a messy end. The government have stated that it isn't there policy to integrate further. I think that judgement should be suspended on Cameron until he attends an IGC. In the meantime we have a stagnant economy and stagnant social mobility. These are the most pressing concerns at the moment and on both the government should be criticised for failing in these areas rather than Europe.
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This argument that Labour would win the next GE if it offers an in/out referendum is fanciful. In 2001,we fought a campaign soley on Europe and were thrashed. The issue ranks very low on voters list of priorities and believe there are two reasons for that. 1: Every PM since Heath has been pro-eu, they have seen parliaments sovereignty eroded and simply accept that the political class will never leave the EU. 2: The British people are overwhelmingly eurosceptic, the electorate, which has become increasingly disengaged from the political process simply don't care anymore. Which is sad but not surprising when you see politicians jumping on the EU gravy train. The EU will collapse because of it's inherent contradictions. We are seeing the beginning of that process now. It's only a matter of time, when Greece defaults. The process will be satisfying to watch.
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I have been reading on this website consistently, that if Labour offer an in/out referendum at the next election they will win. Didn't the Conservative party fight an election solely on the European issue in 2001 and get totally annihalated. The vast majority of the population is eurosceptic, but it is very low down the voters list of priorities. And all this bile at Cameron being pro-EU, because he has betrayed you somehow by not being sufficiently eurosceptic. HELLO!! Name me a british prime minister since Heath who was eurosceptic! None of them have been. Maggie was the one who actually began the intergration process by sigining the odious single european act. How could she have been duped as she has since claimed? The clue is in the title of the act!
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Chris, did you go to an inner city comprehensive? I guess your satisfied with the current system which is selection by money, rather than ability?
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Do English MPs have a say on matters north of the border? Labour lets not forget had to rely on Scottish votes to treble tuition fees, yet in Scotland tuition fees are free.Its madness.
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Yes,Shirley Williams and Anthony Crossland. Two privately educated Fabians, who decided they couldn't possibley see the plebs have as good an education as themselves. They have cosigned millions of childrens lives to the scrapheap. I went to an inner city comprehensive with one of the highest proportion of pupils on free school meals, the brightest children who wanted to succeed academically were subjected to physical and mental abuse. Its time we ended this shameful culture and restore selection by ability.
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Your problem is you want everyone to be equal, even if that means lowering everyone down to the lowest common denominator. Still, it's ok for the children of the shadow cabinet to be exempt from that. Hence why they all attend grammar schools, faith schools or independent schools.
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I believe Michael Gove is sincere, when he says he wants to raise standards in our state schools. However, one has to be sceptical when any new initiative is launched; free schools, academies, national curriculum, GM schools etc. The truth is the political class should never have abolished the 11+, and because they can not bring themselves to admit they made an awful error of judgement. We are saddled with these half-baked initiatives. It is no secret, that standards have declined ever since. Also, the dumbing down of the syallabus year after year, has effectively ruined the educational prospects for millions of people. So while I am glad Mr Cameron wants to see elitism in our state schools. I hope actions speak louder than words.
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I think that is quite disrespectful not to even bother answering the question. Whether you agree with Dorries or not, she is still a member of parliament who has asked the prime minister a question. An evasive answer would have sufficed, but Cameron came across as quite arrogant and given that she was voicing the concerns many members of the party have, it equated to a slap in the face to the membership too.
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It isn't surprising to see this issue is at the top of the voters concerns. And yet we have Huhne pursuing his ridiculous policies which will not only push bills higher but affect economic growth. Of course the plebs can freeze in the winter, while this arrogant fool pursues his deranged climate change policies.
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I think the two main problems with the Conservative party today is image and the ability to connect with the electorate. I'm 27 and in my age bracket, very few vote Conservative. Why? Because they have been brainwashed to believe that the Conservative party is for the rich, scrapping EMAs etc. People of my generation got so used to the gimmie gimmie gimmie years of New Labour that there is a perception that the Conservatives want to some how hurt people by withdrawing bribes of peoples own money. We don't have enough top media performers either, Michael Gove being the one exception. He has brilliantly put across the need for reform in education. But other ministers are sadly lacking in this area and are constantly being outflanked by Labour. Willets and tuition fees comes to mind, in his failiure to articulate that the new system would actually be fairer. The Conservative party is a broad church. It has a Thatcherite wing, it has a One Nation wing and dare i say it has a Liberal wing. The party doesn't belong to one particular wing. What has always been the Conservative partys greatest strength is that it is not straddled to a dogmatic creed like the Labour Party. Or driven by class hatred and spite, it is the party of aspiration, the family and an adherence to the principles of sound money and has been able to and will again in the next election define the centre ground on those principles.
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