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KeepDurhamDifferent!
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lol wut, I thought it was in Derm.
Toggle Commented Feb 16, 2011 on Dogtrot (wedding) at StovePipeHat
KeepDurhamDifferent! is now following Kevin Davis
Feb 16, 2011
Awful news (and yes I own property downtown). Just another case of the rich screwing those trying to scrape by -- this BIDness district should expect to see growth on the other side of the boundary, like on City Line Ave. in Philly. Apt dwellers act as if they're surprised they weren't consulted. C'mon, really?
KeepDurhamDifferent! is now following molls
Feb 16, 2011
I lived in both places as well -- they're not for everyone, but as Kevin says you can't stop progress. 20 years ago Atlanta looked like Charlotte does now (I lived in Myers Park, which is the Buckhead of CLT), and Charlotte looked like the Raleigh of today. Population growth is inevitable; the question is how to manage it, and quite frankly neither Dems or Repubs have good answers. Of the four cities in this region, Raleigh is the most likely to become "like Atlanta or Dallas", and undoubtedly many of us will have left by then. Durham will either become like CH / Carrboro (mostly white hipsters and yuppies), or like East Palo Alto. Which is more desirable is an exercise best left to the reader.
There's plenty wrong with Atlanta, but they have mass transit and smart growth with respect to traffic management (e.g., tolls on the GA 400 to Dunwoody and the high rent suburbs). I also like how Forsyth and the other counties have retained their autonomy, while coordinating regional growth policies where needed. NC has a much stronger state govt than GA, which is why for example Durham keeps getting shafted on the East End Connector and the Duke/Gregson speedway. The old state roads that run through the western residential zones of Buckhead, by contrast, have been tamed.
Hey Kevin, I got news for you: Florida is coming back. It has low taxes and a pro-growth philosophy that is very similar to Texas, another giant jobs magnet. Sure they got carried away with the real estate bubble; Dallas did, too. But they're both being bought up at a discount by global investors such as myself (I recently bought the corner of Pacific & Olive St. near Deep Ellum). NC has the highest taxes in the South, and while there's no chance we'll become Detroit, Michigan...we could have been Atlanta, Georgia. I know plenty of Wall St / BofA refugees who've moved to SC even though they work in Charlotte, for example, and plenty of other NYers and NCers who declare their residence in Fla. to minimise their costs. The great thing is that no matter what happens to the Triangle, Durham will always remain that gritty piece of sand in the bowl of cheese grits that is Raleigh / Cary / Ch Hill / RTP. We can thank Jackie Wagstaff, Dr. Allison and the Committee, and all the cheapskate hipsters for that good fortune. Keep Durham Different.
Gary, I like SoFo for all things Southpointian. Even better would be SoFaux.
It'd be a dream come true for this libertarian, who walks to work, drives a Prius, lives downtown, and shops locally. You must have us confused with the mouth-breathing Tea Party types.
What a joke -- subsidising hotels while the streets are unpaved and criminals run rampant. I miss the Omni (predecessor to the Marriott). The Marriott Convention Center can barely hold on to Full Frame, much less turn a profit!
With all due respect to the local historic districts in OND, WHH, and OWD, they ain't Trinity Park. My model for development is Highland Park in Dallas, or Myers Park in Charlotte, where even "priceless" buildings are occasionally bulldozed so that someone's historic mansion can add an outbuilding (e.g., the gorgeous new greenhouse on Watts), or so that new and unorthodox green architecture can be realised, e.g. the "Chevron" house at Markham and Gregson. Infill development of higher density is good for the environment, and good for property values.
Can't say I'm surprised, as this is just one more nail in the coffin for the formerly cool Carrboro cum Chilton's Cradle and bobo playground. When I moved here in 1987 I saw Public Enemy at the Franklin St. cradle and thought if I ever returned to the triangle I would surely like to live in the "Berkeley of the East". Unfortunately Orange county's brand of new urbanism has priced out all of the diversity, and nowadays you can't hardly busk for change without being run over by a stroller or told you can't use the restroom at one of the chain burrito joints on the top of the hill. I'll take the dirty D town any day, as would most other starving artists. Keep Durham Different!
Can't say I'm surprised, as this is just one more nail in the coffin for the formerly cool Carrboro cum Chilton's Cradle and bobo playground. When I moved here in 1987 I saw Public Enemy at the Franklin St. cradle and thought if I ever returned to the triangle I would surely like to live in the "Berkeley of the East". Unfortunately Orange county's brand of new urbanism has priced out the diversity, and nowadays you can't hardly busk for change without being run over by a stroller or told you can't use the restroom at one of the chain burrito joints on Columbia St. I'll take the dirty D town any day, as would most other starving artists. Keep Durham Different!